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Let, vb. (impf. and partic. let), 1) to suffer, to allow: “how he mocks me! wilt thou l. him, my lord?” Tp. III, 2, 34. “thou --st thy fortune sleep,” II, 1, 216. “l. me see thy cloak,” Gent. III, 1, 132. Err. II, 2, 220. V, 59. All's III, 4, 20. Rom. II, 1, 25. Oth. II, 1, 72. Cymb. V, 4, 20 etc. to l. go, see Go. l. me be == cease your jesting, let me alone, Ado V, 1, 207. to l. fall == to drop, Gent. I, 2, 73. Wint. IV, 4, 117 etc. l. me have == tell me, Gent. II, 7, 57. “l. 's have the tongs and the bones,” Mids. IV, 1, 32 (== sing). “l. me have war,” Cor. IV, 5, 236 (== give me war, war is the word); cf. “l. me know,” Oth. IV, 1, 73 (== I am for knowing, I prefer knowing). Inf. omitted: “l. me to my fortune,” Merch. III, 2, 39 (== let me go to etc.). “to l. him there a month,” Wint. I, 2, 41 (== to l. him remain there). “l. him on,” H8 I, 2, 176. “I'ld whistle her off and l. her down the wind,” Oth. III, 3, 262. to l. loose == a) to give up, to abandon: “I do now let l. my opinion,” Tp. II, 2, 36. b) to quit one's hold: Mids. III, 2, 260. LLL III, 128. c) to turn loose upon the world: “their ragged curtains poorly are l. loose,” H5 IV, 2, 41. “that tyrant . . . thy womb l. loose,” R3 IV, 4, 54 (cf. Loose). to l. alone, see Alone. to l. forth: graves l. 'em (their sleepers) “forth,” Tp. V, 49. Mids. V, 388. would not l. it (my soul) “forth,” R3 I, 4, 38. to l. in == to allow to enter: Meas. IV, 2, 94. Err. III, 1, 30. Err. III, 1, 30 Wint. I, 2, 205. John II, 232. H6A I, 3, 7, H6A I, 3, 7 H8 V, 4, 75. Hml. IV, 5, 54. “to l. out,” Tp. I, 2, 293. Wint. I, 2, 205. H6B IV, 3, 18.
Used imperatively, as a mere form of exhortation, or of concession: “l. 's assist them,” Tp. I, 1, 57. “l. 's all sink with the king,” Tp. I, 1, 57 II, 1, 306. II, 1, 306 II, 1, 306 Gent. I, 1, 56. Merch. V, 297. H6B I, 3, 1. Troil. IV, 4, 146. Troil. IV, 4, 146 Lr. IV, 6, 263 etc. “l. me remember thee,” Tp. I, 2, 243 (== be reminded by me). l. me not live == I will not live, may I not live, Gent. III, 2, 21. “l. her go hang,” Tp. II, 2, 56. “all corners else o'the earth l. liberty make use of,” I, 2, 492. “l. Sebastian wake,” II, 1, 260. “l. them be hunted soundly,” IV, 263. “let no man take care for himself,” V, 256. “l. it lie on my head,” Wiv. II, 1, 191. “l. but your honour know,” Meas. II, 1, 8. “l. him be no kinsman to my liege,” R2 I, 1, 59 (supposing he were no kinsman). “a right good husband, l. him be a noble,” H8 IV, 2, 146 (supposing even he were, though he were, a nobleman). “l. her know it,” Ant. III, 13, 16 etc. l. be == no matter: Wint. V, 3, 61. Hml. V, 2, 235 (Ff om.). Ant. IV, 4, 6. “l. it be so,” Lr. I, 1, 110. I, 4, 327. cf. H8 I, 1, 171. Ant. III, 5, 24 (cf. Be), Inf. omitted: “l. us about it,” H6C IV, 6, 102 (cf. About), l. us into the city == come with me into the city, Gent, III, 2, 91. “l. us to the Tiger,” Err. III, 1, 95. “l. us to the great supper,” Ado I, 3, 73. II, 1, 178. V, 4, 71. Tw. II, 3, 198. Wint. IV, 4, 727. John V, 1, 73. H4A V, 4, 164. H6A I, 1, 45. II, 4, 133. H6B I, 4, 15, III, 3, 33. H6C II, 3, 49. R3 III, 7, 246. V, 3, 312, Ant. II, 5, 3. “l. him from my thoughts,” H4A I, 1, 91, “l. us from it,” Cymb. IV, 4, 1. “l. us on our way,” H6C IV, 2, 28. “l. us away,” Wiv. V, 2, 16. As I, 3, 135, H6A I, 2, 149. H6B IV, 6, 18. H6C I, 1, 255. II, 1, 209. R3 III, 2, 96. “l. us hence,” Ado V, 3, 30. H6C IV, 1, 148. IV, 6, 87. “l. us in,” Merch. V, 49. H6B I, 1, 73. IV, 9, 48. R3 II, 1, 138. “l. us on,” H4B I, 3, 85. H6A III, 3, 90. “l. us thither,” Ado I, 3, 67. “l. him to field,” Troil. I, 1, 5. “l. it to the sea,” Cymb. IV, 2, 152.
2) to leave off, to forbear: “Collatine unwisely did not l. to praise,” Lucr. 10.
3) to cause, to make; followed by an inf. with to: “if your name be Horatio, as I am l. to know it is,” Hml. IV, 6, 11. without to: “l. this letter be read,” LLL IV, 3, 193. “thou still --'st slip,” H4A I, 3, 278. “four rogues in buckram l. drive at me,” II, 4, 217. 247 (cf. Drive). “not --ing it decline,” Troil. IV, 5, 189. “--ing "I dare not" wait upon "I would,"” Mcb. I, 7, 44. Without an inf.: “to l. forth my blood,” Lucr. 1029 (== to shed). “let him to the Tower,” H6B V, 1, 134 (i. e. be carried). “hath much blood l. forth,” All's III, 1, 3. “l. forth thy life,” R3 I, 2, 12. “l. the soul forth,” R3 I, 2, 12 “lest I l. forth your half-pint of blood,” Cor. V, 2, 60. “incision would l. her out in saucers,” LLL IV, 3, 98. “cursed the blood that l. this blood from hence,” R3 I, 2, 16. “l. it blood,” LLL II, 186. “without --ing blood,” R2 I, 1, 153. “his adversaries are l. blood,” R3 III, 1, 183. Troil. II, 3, 222. Caes. III, 1, 152. Cymb. IV, 2, 168.
4) to lease, to lend“: to l. this land by lease,” R2 II, 1, 110. With out: “l. out their coin upon large interest,” Tim. III, 5, 107.
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