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Lie, vb. (impf. lay; partic. lain or “lien; lain:” Lucr. 233. Rom. III, 1, 28. IV, 5, 36. V, 3, 176. “lien:” John IV, 1, 50. In Hml. V, 1, 190 Qq lien, Ff lain; in Per. III, 2, 85 Qq lien, Ff been) 1) to be in a horizontal position, or nearly so: “panting he --s,” Ven. 62. “where they lay,” Ven. 62 Ven. 62 Ven. 62 Sonn. 154, 1. Tp. II, 1, 280. Tp. II, 1, 280 Tp. II, 1, 280 II, 2, 11. Wiv. II, 1, 81. Meas. II, 2, 166. As II, 1, 30. III, 2, 253. Tw. II, 3, 147. Rom. III, 1, 28. Mcb. III, 2, 21. Per. III, 2, 85 etc. etc. to l. down == to lay the body on the ground, to go to rest: As II, 6, 2. H4A II, 2, 33. III, 1, 229. H4B III, 1, 30. Caes. IV, 3, 250. Lr. III, 6, 36. Ant. IV, 14, 47. Cymb. IV, 2, 294. to l. by, in the same sense: H8 III, 1, 11.
2) to be in bed, and, in general, to pass the time of night: “a stranger on that pillow lay,” Lucr. 1620. “in a cowslip's bell I l.” Tp. V, 89. “where they are --ing,” Gent. III, 1, 143. “l. in the woollen,” Ado II, 1, 33. “wheresoe'er she --s,” Mids. II, 2, 90. “where Cressid lay that night,” Merch. V, 6. Merch. V, 6 As II, 3, 23. H4A I, 2, 143. H4B IV, 2, 97. R3 I, 2, 112. II, 4, 1. V, 3, 7. Oth. III, 3, 413 etc. to l. long == to rise late, Troil. IV, 1, 3. “that you do l. so late,” Mcb. II, 3, 25. to l. with == to have carnal intercourse with: Wiv. II, 2, 295. V, 5, 259. Meas. III, 2, 292. Merch. V, 259. Merch. V, 259 Merch. V, 259 As I, 2, 213 (quibbling). All's IV, 2, 72. H6C III, 2, 69. R3 I, 2, 113. I, 4, 140. V, 3, 336. Rom. IV, 5, 36 etc. to l. by, in the same sense: H8 IV, 1, 70. cf. “not wholesome to our cause, that she should l. i' the bosom of our hard-ruled king,” H8 III, 2, 100. “in thy possession --s a lass unparalleled,” Ant. V, 2, 318.
3) to be buried, to be in the grave: “full fathom five thy father --s,” Tp. I, 2, 396. III, 3, 102. V, 152. Meas. III, 1, 119. Ado V, 1, 69. V, 3, 4. Wint. III, 2, 240. IV, 4, 467. R2 III, 3, 168. Rom. V, 3, 176 etc. to l. low == to be struck down, to be dead: “some of us would l. low,” Ado V, 1, 52. “and l. full low,” R2 III, 2, 140. “either we or they must lower l.” H4A III, 3, 228. “dost thou l. so low?” Caes. III, 1, 148.
4) to be confined; a) in prison: “without ransom to l. forfeited,” H4A IV, 3, 96. “I had rather l. in prison,” H6C III, 2, 70. “I will deliver you, or else l. for you,” R3 I, 1, 115. b) by illness: “the wretch that --s in woe,” Mids. V, 384. “though you lay here in this chamber,” Shr. Ind. 2, 86. “--s he not bedrid,” Wint. IV, 4, 412. to l. in == to be in childbed: Cor. I, 3, 86.
5) to be placed in any manner implying want of motion: “her lily hand her rosy cheek --s under,” Lucr. 386. “l. there, my art,” Tp. I, 2, 25. let it (the letter) “l.” Gent. I, 2, 76. “in my chamber-window --s a book,” Ado II, 3, 3. Tw. II, 2, 16. II, 5, 24. III, 2, 49. John II, 143. III, 2, 3. H4B IV, 5, 21. H4B IV, 5, 21 H5 IV, 2, 50. Tim. III, 6, 127. Mcb. I, 4, 50. Hml. V, 1, 190 etc.
6) to be situated: “where my land --s,” Wint. IV, 3, 105. “my fortunes do all l. there,” IV, 4, 602. “the remnant northward, --ing off from Trent,” H4A III, 1, 79. “here Southam --s,” H6C V, 1, 12. “in Troy there --s the scene,” H6C V, 1, 12. “the demesnes that here adjacent l.” Rom. II, 1, 20. “here --s the east,” Caes. II, 1, 101. Similarly: “the bath for my help --s where Cupid got new fire,” Sonn. 153, 13. “your conscience, where --s that?” Tp. II, 1, 276. “where --s thy grief?” LLL IV, 3, 171. LLL IV, 3, 171 “what upward --s the street should see,” LLL IV, 3, 171 John IV, 1, 48. “there --s your way,” Shr. III, 2, 212. Tw. I, 5, 215. III, 1, 145. Troil. IV, 1, 79. “large lengths of seas between my father and my mother lay,” John I, 106. “this way --s the game,” H6C IV, 5, 14. “if thy flight lay toward the sea,” Lr. III, 4, 10. “under her breast --s a mole,” Cymb. II, 4, 135.
7) to reside, to lodge, to dwell: “where --s Sir Proteus?” Gent. IV, 2, 137. “does he l. at the Garter?” Wiv. II, 1, 187. “when the court lay at Windsor,” II, 2, 63. “she must l. here on mere necessity,” LLL I, 1, 149. “there doth my father l.” Shr. IV, 4, 56. “she will l. at my house,” All's III, 5, 34. “the king --s by a beggar,” Tw. III, 1, 8. “when I lay at Clement's inn,” H4B III, 2, 299. “her poor castle where she --s,” H6A II, 2, 41. “there young Henry with his nobles l.” III, 2, 129. “I lay here in Corioli at a poor man's house,” Cor. I, 9, 82. “where great Aufidius --s,” IV, 4, 8. “where Cassio --s,” Oth. III, 4, 2. “his remembrance lay in Egypt with his joy,” Ant. I, 5, 57 etc.
8) to be posted in time of war, to be encamped, to be stationed: “the warlike band where her beloved Collatinus --s,” Lucr. 256. “how far off --s your power?” R2 III, 2, 63. R2 III, 2, 63 “the English l. within fifteen hundred paces,” H5 III, 7, 135. R3 V, 3, 37. Cor. I, 4, 8. Ant. II, 2, 162 etc. Similarly: “had Collatinus lain in ambush to betray my life,” Lucr. 233. “how --s their battle?” Cor. I, 6, 51.
9) to be contained, to be deposited: “look in mine eye-balls, there thy beauty --s,” Ven. 119. “who fears sinking where such treasure --s,” Lucr. 280. the guiltless casket where it (the jewel) “lay,” Lucr. 280 if in the child the father's image --s, 1753; cf. H4B V, 2, 74. how long lay you there (in the basket)? Wiv. III, 5, 95. “your goods that lay at host in the Centaur,” Err. V, 410. “whilst thou layest in thy unhallowed dam,” Merch. IV, 1, 136. “love-thoughts l. rich when canopied with bowers,” Tw. I, 1, 41. “where l. my maiden weeds,” V, 262. “my honesty that --s enclosed in this trunk,” Wint. I, 2, 435. “there --s such secrets in this fardel,” IV, 4, 783. “in my loyal bosom --s his power,” R2 II, 3, 98. “in the reproof of this --s the jest,” H4A I, 2, 213. “some lay in dead men's skulls,” R3 I, 4, 29 etc.
10) to rest, not to stir: “the wind is loud and will not l.” Per. III, 1, 49. “when our quick winds l. still,” Ant. I, 2, 114; cf. John IV, 1, 50.
11) to remain unsold: “'twas a commodity lay fretting by you,” Shr. II, 330. “'tis a commodity will lose the gloss with --ing,” All's I, 1, 167. “l. they upon thy hand,” Ant. II, 5, 105.
12) to be in a posture of defence: “here I lay, and thus I bore my point,” H4A II, 4, 216. “one knows not at what ward you l.; -- at all these wards I l.” Troil. I, 2, 283. Troil. I, 2, 283
13) to be in a place or state, to be found: “making a famine where abundance --s,” Sonn. 1, 7. “being asked where all thy beauty --s,” 2, 5. “at this hour l. at my mercy all mine enemies,” Tp. IV, 264. it (labour) “--s starkly in the traveller's bones,” Meas. IV, 2, 70. “their business still --s out o' door,” Err. II, 1, 11. “where light in darkness --s,” LLL I, 1, 78. “in my heart l. there what hidden woman's fear there will,” As I, 3, 121. “fairer prove your honour than in my thought it --s,” All's V, 3, 184. “where --s your text?” Tw. I, 5, 240. “in delay there --s no plenty,” II, 3, 51. “the play so --s that I must play a part,” Wint. IV, 4, 669. “with me thy fortune --s,” John III, 1, 337. “if judgment l. in them,” R2 II, 2, 133. “every thing --s level to our wish,” H4B IV, 4, 7. “there --s a cooling card,” H6A V, 3, 84. “there the action --s in his true nature,” Hml. III, 3, 61. “here --s the point,” V, 1, 10. “thou --st in it,” V, 1, 10 “that way madness --s,” Lr. III, 4, 21. “my acquaintance --s little amongst them,” Per. IV, 6, 206 etc. Joined with adjectives: “my mercy which --s dead,” John IV, 1, 26. “would thou mighst l. drowning the washing of ten tides,” Tp. I, 1, 60. “the shore that now --s foul and muddy,” V, 82. “griefs of mine l. heavy in my breast,” Rom. I, 1, 192. “in this life l. hid moe thousand deaths,” Meas. III, 1, 40. “when service should in my old limbs l. lame,” As II, 3, 41. “all ways do l. open,” Wiv. II, 2, 175. “I l. open to the law,” H6A I, 3, 159. H8 III, 2, 334. “l. all unlocked to your occasions,” Merch. I, 1, 139.
Followed by in, == to be in the power of, to depend on: “if thine honour lay in me,” Lucr. 834. “it --s in thee to make him much outlive a gilded tomb,” Sonn. 101, 10. “it --s much in your holding up,” Meas. III, 1, 273. “good luck --s in odd numbers,” Wiv. V, 1, 2. Ado II, 2, 21. LLL V, 2, 871. Mids. II, 1, 118. Merch. IV, 1, 355. As I, 1, 21. All's V, 2, 49. V, 3, 146. John II, 440. R2 I, 2, 4. II, 2, 130. Cor. III, 3, 94. Rom. I, 5, 4. Tim. IV, 3, 322. Ant. I, 2, 80 etc. Similarly within: “both our remedies within thy help and holy physic --s,” Rom. II, 3, 52. “that, opened, --s within our remedy,” Hml. II, 2, 18.
Followed by on, == a) to weigh, to press: “a heavy summons --s like lead upon me,” Mcb. II, 1, 6. With heavy: “this fever --s heavy on me,” John V, 3, 4. R2 IV, 66. H4A IV, 3, 80. Tim. III, 5, 10. b) to come on, to fall to the share of: “let it l. on my head,” Wiv. II, 1, 191. Wiv. II, 1, 191 “which fault --s on the hazards of all husbands,” John I, 119. “the penance --s on you,” H8 I, 4, 32. “his faults l. gently on him!” IV, 2, 31. c) to be a matter of obligation or duty: “now it --s you on to speak to the people,” Cor. III, 2, 52. d) to depend on: “my life on thy revolt doth l.” Sonn. 92, 10. “as if his life lay on it,” All's III, 7, 43. “would the quarrel lay upon our heads,” H4A V, 2, 48. “the glory of our Troy doth this day l. on his fair worth,” Troil. IV, 4, 149. “our fortune --s upon this jump,” Ant. III, 8, 5.
To lie heavy to == heavy on: “it would unclog my heart of what --s heavy to't.” Cor. IV, 2, 48. cf. Hml. I, 2, 124.
Followed by under, == to be subject to, to suffer from: if this sweet lady l. not guiltless here under some “biting error,” Ado IV, 1, 171. “let him, like an engine not portable, l. under this report,” Troil. II, 3, 144.
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