previous next
Line, subst. 1) a slender cord, a string: “hang them on this l.” Tp. IV, 193.* “mistress l., is not this my jerkin?” Tp. IV, 193 Used of the string that sustains the angler's hook: “hold hook and l.” H4B II, 4, 172 (cf. Hold). “you perceive me not how I give l.” Wint. I, 2, 181 (how I leave the fish free play with the bait). Hence metaphorically, == free scope, latitude: “give him l. and scope,” H4B IV, 4, 39. “with full l. of his authority,” Meas. I, 4, 56.
2) the string serving for a ruler; and metaphorically, rule, method, principle: “we steal by l. and level,” Tp. IV, 1, 239. Tp. IV, 1, 239 “his life is paralleled even with the stroke and l. of his great justice,” Meas. IV, 2, 83. “observe degree, priority and place . . . . in all l. of order,” Troil. I, 3, 88. In a bad sense, --s == caprices: “your husband is in his old --s again,” Wiv. IV, 2, 22 (M. Edd. lunes; the spurious Qq vein). “his pettish --s, his ebbs, his flows,” Troil. II, 3, 139 (M. Edd. lunes; Q his course and time).
3) a mark which has length without breadth: “more --s than is in the new map,” Tw. III, 2, 84. “many --s close in the dial's centre,” H5 I, 2, 210. “yon grey --s that fret the clouds,” Caes. II, 1, 103. “of all these bounds, even from this l. to this,” Lr. I, 1, 64. to meet in one l. == to go the same way: “powers from home and discontents at home meet in one l.” John IV, 3, 152. “when in one l. two crafts directly meet,” Hml. III, 4, 210. Used of the work of a draughtsman: “so should the --s of life that life repair,” Sonn. 16, 9 (metaph.); cf. 19, 10. Of marks in the palm of the hand: “here's a simple l. of life,” Merch. II, 2, 169 (a good omen). Of wrinkles: “draw no --s there with thy antic pen,” Sonn. 19, 10. “filled his brow with --s and wrinkles,” 63, 4. “he does smile his face into more --s,” Tw. III, 2, 84.
4) lineament: “every l. and trick of his sweet favour,” All's I, 1, 107. “which warped the l. of every other favour,” V, 3, 49. “looking on the --s of my boy's face,” Wint. I, 2, 153. “those --s of favour which then he wore,” Cymb. IV, 2, 104. Used of the outline of the whole body: “the --s of my body are as well drawn as his,” Cymb. IV, 1, 10.
5) the equator: “under the l.” Tp. IV, 237. H8 V, 4, 44.
6) row, rank, file: “to show the l. and the predicament wherein you range,” H4A I, 3, 168. “in that very l. standest thou,” III, 2, 85.
7) lineage: “of the true l. and stock of Charles the Great,” H5 I, 2, 71. H5 I, 2, 71 “fourth of that heroic l.” H6A II, 5, 78. H6B II, 2, 34. H6C I, 1, 19. I, 3, 32. Mcb. III, 1, 60. IV, 1, 117. IV, 1, 117 Hence == pedigree: “he sends you this most memorable l.” H5 II, 4, 88; cf. H5 II, 4, 88
8) the words which stand in one row between the two margins: “in one l. his name twice writ,” Gent. I, 2, 123. Hence == verse: “to attend each l.” Lucr. 818. “if you read this l.” Sonn. 71, 5. 74, 3. 86, 13. Gent. III, 2, 76. All's II, 1, 81. Hml. II, 2, 470. Plur. --s == a) anything written: “comest thou with deep premeditated --s,” H6A III, 1, 1. Tit. V, 2, 14. Tit. V, 2, 14 b) verses: Ven. Dedic. Tit. V, 2, 14 Lucr. Dedic. Tit. V, 2, 14 Sonn. 18, 12. 32, 4. 63, 13. 103, 8. 115, 1. Gent. II, 1, 94. Gent. II, 1, 94 LLL IV, 3, 55. LLL IV, 3, 55 LLL IV, 3, 55 H6A V, 5, 14. Tit. IV, 2, 27. Hml. II, 2, 462. Hml. II, 2, 462 III, 2, 4. c) a letter: “in top of rage the --s she rents,” Compl. 55. Gent. I, 1, 160. I, 2, 42. I, 3, 45. IV, 4, 133. John IV, 3, 17. R3 V, 2, 6.
hide Dictionary Entry Lookup
Use this tool to search for dictionary entries in all lexica.
Search for in
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: