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Mean, vb. (impf. and partic. meant), 1) absol. to be minded, to be disposed; joined with an adverb (Germ. es meinen): “my cousin --t well,” Wiv. I, 1, 265. “Petruchio --s but well,” Shr. III, 2, 22. “if you m. well, now go with me and with this holy man into the chantry,” Tw. IV, 3, 22. “I cannot speak so well, nor m. better,” Wint. IV, 4, 392. I do (perceive your mind) “and m. accordingly,” H6A II, 2, 60. “if thou --est well, I greet thee well,” H6B V, 1, 14. “as if I --t naughtily,” Troil. IV, 2, 38. “we m. well in going to this mask,” Rom. I, 4, 48. “they that m. virtuously, and yet do so,” Oth. IV, 1, 7. Passively: “is it not --t damnable in us, to be trumpeters of our unlawful intents?” All's IV, 3, 31.
2) trans. a) to have in mind, to think of in speaking, to be saying (though not expressing directly); followed by an accus. or by a clause: “--t thereby thou shouldst print more,” Sonn. 11, 13 (cf. by in Gent. V, 4, 167. Err. III, 1, 10. Mids. III, 2, 236 etc.). “the miracle, I m. our preservation,” Tp. II, 1, 7. “I m., in a sort,” Tp. II, 1, 7 “you mistake; I m. the pound,” Gent. I, 1, 113. II, 1, 49. II, 1, 49 II, 1, 49 II, 3, 46. II, 5, 51. III, 1, 101. III, 1, 101 V, 4, 167. Wiv. III, 4, 63. Meas. II, 4, 118. Err. II, 1, 58. III, 1, 10. III, 1, 10 IV, 2, 8. IV, 3, 15. Ado I, 1, 35. Mids. II, 2, 47. III, 2, 236. Merch. II, 9, 25 (that 'many' may be --t by the fool multitude, == of the fool multitude; cf. By). Shr. V, 2, 19. Shr. V, 2, 19 Shr. V, 2, 19 All's I, 3, 174. Wint. IV, 4, 197. Rom. I, 4, 44. Cymb. IV, 1, 9 etc. etc. With how and so: “how doest thou m. a fat marriage?” Err. III, 2, 95. “how m. you, sir?” LLL I, 2, 20. “how m. you that?” Shr. I, 1, 59. V, 2, 21. “how do you m.?” All's III, 5, 71. “m. you so?” Err. III, 1, 81. “I --t not so,” LLL IV, 1, 13. What do you m. or what m. you? used reproachfully, == do not so, or do not say so (Germ. was denkst du dir dabei?): “what dost thou m. to stifle beauty?” Ven. 933 (== in stifling beauty). “what do you m. to dote thus on such luggage?” Tp. IV, 230. “what m. you, sir? for God's sake, hold your hands,” Err. I, 2, 93. “what m. you, madam? I never swore such an oath,” LLL V, 2, 450. “what m. you? you will lose your reputation,” LLL V, 2, 450 “what doest thou m.? is it a world to hide virtues in?” Tw. I, 3, 140. but what m. I to speak so true, H4B Ind. Tw. I, 3, 140 “what do you m.?” Lr. III, 7, 77. “what m. you, madam? I have made no fault,” Ant. II, 5, 74. “what m. you, sir, to give them this discomfort?” IV, 2, 33. Hence: “what --s the world to say it is not so?” Sonn. 148, 6 (== the world is mistaken). “what --s death in this rude assault? Villain, thy own hand yields thy death's instrument,” R2 V, 5, 106 (== death is mistaken and shall be disappointed. Jocularly: “what a plague --s my niece, to take the death of her brother thus?” Tw. I, 3, 1. “what a plague m. ye to colt me thus?” H4A II, 2, 39.
In speaking of things, == to signify, to indicate, to purport: “what --s this passion at his name?” Gent. I, 2, 16. “what --s this jest?” Err. II, 2, 21. “what --s this?” As III, 5, 41. H6A I, 3, 29. we wot not what it (the word submission) “--s,” IV, 7, 55 etc.
b) to have a mind, to intend, to purpose; with an accus.: “know not what we m.” Ven. 126. “I m. it not,” Wiv. III, 4, 88. “no man --s evil but the devil,” V, 2, 15. “nor I m. it not,” Meas. II, 1, 124. Merch. III, 5, 82. “if they m. a fray,” Mids. III, 2, 447. “do you m. good faith?” Merch. III, 2, 212. “what I did not well I --t well,” Wint. V, 3, 3. “he may m. more,” H6A I, 2, 122. “Talbot --s no goodness,” III, 2, 72. “things are often spoke and seldom --t,” H6B III, 1, 268. “he --t all harm,” H6C V, 7, 34. “where he did m. no chase,” R3 III, 2, 30. “where all faith was --t,” H8 III, 1, 53. “one that --s his proper harm,” Cor. I, 9, 57. “thankful even for hate, that is --t love,” Rom. III, 5, 149. “--s most deceit,” Per. I, 4, 75 etc. With accus. and dat.: “my hand --t nothing to my sword,” Ado V, 1, 57 (or can this be == my hand to my sword, i. e. put to my sword, meant nothing?). “the poor deer's blood, that my heart --s no ill,” LLL IV, 1, 35. “when fortune --s to men most good,” John III, 4, 119. “I never --t him any ill,” H6B II, 3, 91. “--ing treason to our royal person,” III, 1, 70. “you m. no good to him,” R3 III, 7, 87. Tit. V, 3, 10. Cymb. I, 5, 66. With an inf.: “their queen --s to immure herself,” Ven. 1194. “if thou m. to chide,” Lucr. 484. Gent. II, 1, 125. II, 4, 80. II, 6, 33. IV, 4, 27. Wiv. I, 3, 47. IV, 6, 46. Meas. II, 1, 242. IV, 2, 206. Err. III, 1, 108. IV, 3, 79. Ado II, 1, 370. III, 2, 91. Mids. I, 1, 250. II, 2, 55. Merch. III, 2, 194. John I, 215. H6A II, 2, 58. H6B II, 1, 143. Cor. V, 1, 72. Rom. II, 1, 42. Caes. IV, 2, 28 etc. etc. With a clause: “you have taken it wiselier than I --t you should,” Tp. II, 1, 21. “her father --s she shall be all in white,” Wiv. IV, 6, 35. “as never I m. thou shalt,” Wint. IV, 4, 440.
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