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Need, subst. 1) occasion for something, want, exigency: “'tis more than n.” LLL IV, 3, 289 and John I, 179 (== there is the most urgent occasion for it; it is absolutely necessary). “the very stream of his life must upon a warranted n. give him a better proclamation,” Meas. III, 2, 152 (on need of a warrant; when a warrant is needed). “what apology you think may make it probable n.” All's II, 4, 52. “my appointments have in them a n. greater than shows itself,” II, 5, 72. “most opportune to our n. I have a vessel,” Wint. IV, 4, 511. “I would your spirit were . . . stronger for your n.” Wint. IV, 4, 511 “the Lady Constance speaks not from her faith, but from her n.” John III, 1, 211. “whom he hath used rather for sport than n.” V, 2, 175. “never so few, and never yet more n.” H4B I, 1, 215. “if n. were,” R3 III, 7, 166. “what's the n.?” H8 II, 4, 2. “there is no n.” Rom. III, 1, 10. “this same thought did but forerun my n.” V, 1, 53. “immediate are my --s,” Tim. II, 1, 25. “the present n. speaks to atone you,” Ant. II, 2, 101. “O reason not the n.” Lr. II, 4, 267. Almost == business: “effected many nicer --s,” All's IV, 3, 105. for a n. == in case of necessity: “with five hundred, for a n.” H6C I, 2, 67. “nay, for a n., thus far come near my person,” R3 III, 5, 85. “you could, for a n., study a speech,” Hml. II, 2, 566 (Qq for n.). “to have n.:” Shr. I, 1, 215. All's II, 7, 169. H6A I, 1, 157. H6B IV, 2, 8. Tit. IV, 2, 15. Rom. IV, 3, 13. to have n. of a person or a thing: Gent. IV, 4, 69. Wiv. III, 3, 193. Ado III, 3, 121. Wint. IV, 2, 13. IV, 3, 57. H4A III, 2, 3. R3 I, 3, 76. R3 I, 3, 76 Troil. IV, 4, 23. Rom. IV, 3, 3. Tim. I, 2, 100. Mcb. II, 2, 32. Ant. III, 11, 10. “n. of any engine,” Tp. II, 1, 161. “our great n. of him,” Caes. I, 3, 161. “there is no n. of:” Ado III, 3, 22. H4B IV, 1, 97. R3 III, 7, 165. “of posting is no n.” Sonn. 51, 4. “what I stand in n. of,” Gent. II, 7, 84. “God send me no n. of thee,” Rom. III, 1, 8. Followed by an inf. with to: “I have no n. to beg,” R2 IV, 309. “there was no n. to trouble himself with such thoughts,” H5 II, 3, 22. H6B IV, 2, 3. R3 II, 1, 36. Rom. I, 3, 33. Hml. II, 2, 3. Lr. I, 2, 34. I, 4, 211. Cymb. II, 3, 67. Without to: “thou hadst n. send for more money,” Tw. II, 3, 199 (== thou wouldst do well, thou hadst better). “captains had n. look to't,” H4B II, 4, 163. “we had n. pray, and heartily, for our deliverance,” H8 II, 2, 45. “he had n. mean better than his outward show can speak in his commend,” Per. II, 2, 48. cf. “so had you n.” As II, 7, 169 (== you do well). H6A I, 1, 157. H6B IV, 2, 8.
2) indigence, distress, extremity: “he will help thee in thy n.” Pilgr. 424. “your n. to sustain,” Tw. IV, 2, 135. “forced by n. and accident,” Wint. V, 1, 92. “tread down my n.” John III, 1, 215. “we did it for pure n.” H6B II, 1, 157. “in thy n. such comfort come to thee,” H6C I, 4, 165. “lest in our n. he might infect another,” V, 4, 46. “which in his greatest n. will shrink from him,” R3 V, 2, 21. “n. and oppression starveth in thine eyes,” Rom. V, 1, 70. Hml. I, 5, 180. Lr. II, 4, 273. Cymb. III, 6, 13. V, 3, 45.
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