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Nurse, subst. 1) a woman that suckles or tends an infant: Ven. 974. Lucr. 813. Lucr. 813 Sonn. 22, 12. Gent. I, 2, 58. Meas. I, 3, 30. Ado III, 3, 70. Ado III, 3, 70 As II, 7, 144. Wint. II, 3, 187. R2 I, 3, 170. R2 I, 3, 170 II, 1, 51. V, 3, 113. R3 II, 4, 32. IV, 1, 102. Cor. II, 1, 222. V, 3, 110. V, 6, 97. Tit. II, 3, 28. IV, 2, 83. IV, 2, 83 IV, 2, 83 Rom. I, 3, 1. II, 4, 155. 182 etc. Ant. V, 2, 313. Per. III Prol. 43. IV Prol. 42. IV, 1, 53. V, 1, 161.
2) one who brings up, or takes a motherly care of another: “I will attend my husband, be his n.” Err. V, 98 (i. e. in his illness). “a loving n., a mother to his youth,” Tit. I, 332. “Euriphile, thou wast their n.” Cymb. III, 3, 104. V, 5, 340. “you have a n. of me,” Per. IV, 1, 25. “--s are not the fates,” IV, 3, 14. put to n. == entrusted to another's care, H6B IV, 2, 150. Misapplied by Evans: “his n., or his dry n.” Wiv. I, 2, 4.
3) Metaphorically, that which brings up, nourishes, or causes to grow: “what banquet wert thou to the taste, being n. and feeder of the other four,” Ven. 446. “night, desire's foul n.” Ven. 446 “night . . . n. of blame,” Lucr. 767. “time is the n. and breeder of all good,” Gent. III, 1, 243. “pardon is still the n. of second woe,” Meas. II, 1, 298. “melancholy is the n. of frenzy,” Shr. Ind. 2, 135. “sleep, nature's soft n.” H4B III, 1, 6. “peace, dear n. of arts,” H5 V, 2, 35. “I am your sorrow's n.” R3 II, 2, 87. “Rome, the n. of judgement,” H8 II, 2, 94. “the dung, the beggar's n. and Caesar's,” Ant. V, 2, 8.
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