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Old, adj. (compar. “older:” Sonn. 110, 11. Rom. II, 4, 127. Caes. IV, 3, 31. Mcb. IV, 3, 191. In R3 III, 2, 62 Ff --er, Qq elder. Superl. “oldest:” H4B IV, 5, 127. Cor. IV, 6, 68. Lr. V, 3, 325. cf. Elder and Eldest). 1) advanced in years, aged: Ven. 837. Ven. 837 Compl. 128. Sonn. 68, 12. 97, 4. Tp. II, 1, 30. III, 3, 2. III, 3, 2 IV, 159. V, 15. Gent. II, 4, 69. Wiv. II, 1, 118. II, 2, 134. II, 2, 134 Meas. I, 1, 46. III, 1, 36. Err. I, 1, 97. IV, 2, 19. V, 317. Tw. I, 3, 126. R2 V, 2, 13. Troil. II, 2, 104 (Q elders). Cor. III, 1, 228 etc. etc. “this fair child of mine shall sum my count and make my o. excuse,” Sonn. 2, 11 (== the excuse of my oldness). “I'll rack thee with o. cramps,” Tp. I, 2, 369 (such as old people are wont to suffer; cf. Aged). “he'll shape his o. course in a country new,” Lr. I, 1, 190 (the course of his old age).
2) of any specified age: “how o. are you?” As V, 1, 20. Lr. I, 4, 39. “three years o.” Tp. I, 2, 41. Wiv. I, 1, 55. Meas. III, 2, 214. LLL IV, 2, 36. As IV, 1, 95. V, 2, 66. Shr. V, 1, 86 etc. “at nine months o.” H6B IV, 9, 4. H6C III, 1, 76. R3 II, 3, 17. “at two hours o.” II, 4, 28. “at twelve year o.” Rom. I, 3, 2. Cymb. I, 1, 58. III, 3, 101. Peculiar phrases: “one that is a prisoner nine years o.” Meas. IV, 2, 135 (== a prisoner since nine years). “my absence was not six months o.” Err. I, 1, 45. “in Ephesus I am but two hours o.” II, 2, 150. “ere we were two days o. at sea,” Hml. IV, 6, 15. “changing still one vice, but of a minute o., for one not half so o. as that,” Cymb. II, 5, 31.
3) being of long continuance: “o. woes, not infant sorrows, bear them mild,” Lucr. 1096. “to try an --er friend,” Sonn. 110, 11. “the o. saying,” Gent. V, 2, 11. LLL IV, 1, 121 (cf. o. ends sub End). “the o. Windsor way,” Wiv. III, 1, 6. “'tis o. but true,” IV, 2, 109. “an o. tale,” IV, 4, 28. Ado I, 1, 218. “this news is o. enough,” Meas. III, 2, 243. Meas. III, 2, 243 IV, 3, 4. V, 2. Ado III, 2, 41. IV, 1, 208. V, 2, 78. LLL III, 21. IV, 3, 78. Mids. I, 1, 4. Shr. III, 1, 80. Shr. III, 1, 80 III, 2, 30. III, 2, 30 Tw. II, 4, 3. John III, 4, 145. H4A V, 4, 102. R3 IV, 1, 73. Caes. IV, 3, 31. Oth. I, 1, 37. Cymb. III, 5, 54 etc. Hence == accustomed, practised, customary: “your o. vice still,” Gent. III, 1, 283. “an o. lovemonger,” LLL II, 254. “o. mocker,” V, 2, 552. “my o. ward,” H4A II, 4, 215. “is he so young a man and so o. a lifter?” Troil. I, 2, 128. “the seas and winds, o. wranglers,” II, 2, 75. “doth she not think me an o. murderer?” Rom. III, 3, 94. “o. Cassius still,” Caes. V, 1, 63. “the o. course of death,” Lr. III, 7, 101. == worn and decayed by time: “the text is o.” Ven. 806. “an o. coat,” Wiv. I, 1, 18. I, 3, 18. “o. ginger,” Meas. IV, 3, 6. “her o. gloves,” As IV, 3, 26. “the rest were ragged, o. and beggarly,” Shr. IV, 1, 140. “your fooling grows o.” Tw. I, 5, 119 etc. Of o. == since long: “I know you of o.” Ado I, 1, 146. H6A I, 2, 39.
4) having existed in former ages, ancient: “o. Adam,” Err. IV, 3, 13. R2 III, 4, 73. “of an o. father's mind,” LLL IV, 2, 33. “good o. Mantuan,” LLL IV, 2, 33 “an o. Roman coin,” V, 2, 617. “o. Ninny's tomb,” Mids. V, 268. “like the o. Robin Hood,” As I, 1, 122. “the o. age,” Tw. II, 4, 49. “o. Troy,” R2 V, 1, 11. “since the o. days of goodman Adam,” H4A II, 4, 105. “wolves, thy o. inhabitants,” H4B IV, 5, 138. “the o. Assyrian slings,” H5 IV, 7, 65. “the nine sibyls of o. Rome,” H6A I, 2, 56. “o. Brutus' statue,” Caes. I, 3, 146. “this borrowed passion stands for true o. woe,” Per. IV, 4, 24. Of o. == ancient, anciently: “sad stories chanced in the times of o.” Tit. III, 2, 83. “the hearts of o. gave hands,” Oth. III, 4, 46.
5) former: “is in his o. lines again,” Wiv. IV, 2, 22. “his o. betrothed,” Meas. III, 2, 293. “the o. ornament of his cheek,” Ado III, 2, 46. “I have a trick of the o. rage,” LLL V, 2, 417. “thy o. master,” Merch. II, 2, 162 II, 4, 17. “the o. duke,” As I, 1, 104. “o. care done,” R2 IV, 196. “o. desire doth in his death-bed lie,” Rom. II Chor. Rom. II Chor. “thy o. groans ring yet in my ancient ears,” II, 3, 74. Of o. == former, formerly: “nor with such free and friendly conference as he hath used of o.” Caes. IV, 2, 18. “for that our love of o.” V, 5, 27. “for those of o. and the late dignities,” Mcb. I, 6, 18.
6) Used as a familiar term expressive of some cordiality: “go thy ways, o. lad,” Shr. V, 2, 181. Tw. III, 2, 9. H4A I, 2, 47. Tit. IV, 2, 121. “go thy ways, o. Jack,” H4A II, 4, 141. “God-a-mercy, o. heart,” H5 IV, 1, 34. “well said, o. mole,” Hml. I, 5, 162. “art thou mad, o. fellow?” Lr. II, 2, 91. cf. “the rotten carcass of o. Death,” John II, 456. “o. Time the clock-setter,” III, 1, 324. “o. father antic the law,” H4A I, 2, 69. “o. grub,” Rom. I, 4, 68. “from o. Verona,” Shr. I, 2, 49. “to o'ertop o. Pelion,” Hml. V, 1, 276. “where's my serpent of o. Nile?” Ant. I, 5, 25.
7) copius, plentiful, overmuch; in familiar language: “here will be an o. abusing of God's patience,” Wiv. I, 4, 5. “yonder's o. coil at home,” Ado V, 2, 98. “we shall have o. swearing,” Merch. IV, 2, 15. “news, o. news,” Shr. III, 2, 30. “here will be o. Utis,” H4B II, 4, 21. “he should have o. turning the key,” Mcb. II, 3, 2.
Used as an adverb: “a song that o. was sung,” Mcb. II, 3, 2 (Gower's speech).
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