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One (probably sometimes pronounced “on:” Gent. II, 1, 1 and LLL IV, 2, 86; rhyming to “bone, alone, Scone, thrown:” Ven. 293. Sonn. 39, 6. Mcb. V, 8, 74. Cymb. V, 4, 61. cf. Walker's Critical Examination II, 90), 1) the first whole number consisting of a single unit: one: “tell,” Tp. II, 1, 15. “five for one,” III, 3, 48. “twenty to one,” Gent. I, 1, 72. “'twixt twelve and o.” Wiv. IV, 6, 19. V, 5, 78. Err. I, 2, 46. Ado IV, 1, 85. Tw. I, 3, 113. Hml. V, 2, 74 etc.
As an adjective: “ten kisses short as one, one long as twenty,” Ven. 22. “one sweet kiss,” Ven. 22 “not one wrinkle,” Ven. 22 Ven. 22 Ven. 22 Ven. 22 Ven. 22 Ven. 22 Ven. 22 Ven. 22 Ven. 22 1187 etc. “a thousand more mischances than this one,” Gent. V, 3, 3. “this one night,” Tp. V, 302. “if I could shake off but one seven years,” Cor. IV, 1, 55. “making the green one red,” Mcb. II, 2, 63; cf. “seemed all one mutual cry,” Mids. IV, 1, 122; “let one spirit of the first-born Cain reign,” H4B I, 2, 157; “make of your prayers one sweet sacrifice,” H8 II, 1, 77; “all with one consent,” Troil. III, 3, 176; “there is but one mind in all these men,” Caes. II, 3, 6. Cor. III, 1, 288. IV, 6, 137. Hml. I, 2, 4.
2) a single person or thing: “not one of them that yet looks on me,” Tp. V, 82. “I will make shift for one,” H6B IV, 8, 33. “by ones, by twos and by threes,” Cor. II, 3, 47. “there's never a one of you but trusts a knave,” Tim. V, 1, 96 (cf. A). “there's not a one of them but in his house I keep a servant fee'd,” Mcb. III, 4, 131. “the censure of the which one,” Hml. III, 2, 30 etc. “why write I still all one, ever the same,” Sonn. 76, 5. “gleaning all the land's wealth into one,” H8 III, 2, 284. “as I have made ye one, lords, one remain,” V, 3, 181 (i. e. in concord, unanimous). “to be much at o.” H5 V, 2, 204 (== of the same value). all one == the same: “stand-under and understand is all one,” Gent. II, 5, 34. “that's all one,” Gent. III, 1, 263. Wiv. I, 1, 30. LLL V, 2, 530. Mids. I, 2, 51. As III, 5, 133. Shr. III, 2, 83. Tw. V, 201. H4A IV, 2, 52. “all is one,” Ado V, 1, 49. Oth. IV, 3, 23. “it's all one,” Tw. I, 5, 137. “all is one with her,” Wiv. II, 2, 79. “all's one to him,” All's IV, 3, 158. Wint. V, 2, 131. H6B I, 3, 105. all's one for that (== no matter for that, never mind): H4A II, 4, 172. R3 V, 3, 8. “'twere all o. that I should love a bright particular star,” All's I, 1, 96. “were't not all one an empty eagle were set to guard the chicken,” H6B III, 1, 248. “he doth resemble you. As much as an apple doth an oyster, and all one,” Shr. IV, 2, 101 (== and no matter what? any thing?).
3) a particular person (== a person, a man, somebody): “one on shore,” Ven. 817. “one that hath dropped a jewel,” Ven. 817 Ven. 817 “the one doth flatter thee,” Ven. 817 Tp. I, 2, 99. III, 1, 49. V, 265. Gent. I, 3, 61. II, 1, 22. II, 1, 22 II, 1, 22 IV, 3, 5. IV, 4, 22. Wiv. IV, 2, 152 (there was one conveyed out of my house). Meas. I, 1, 42. Tw. I, 5, 134 “(there's one at the gate).” II, 5, 30. Wint. IV, 4, 398 (one being dead, I shall have more than you can dream of). Caes. II, 1, 112 (one by one) etc. (For one another look sub Another). be one of them (== join their company), Gent. IV, 1, 39. to make one (== to be of a party): Wiv. II, 3, 48. LLL V, 1, 160. Tw. I, 5, 213. H4A I, 2, 113. H4A I, 2, 113 Caes. V, 5, 72. Per. II, 1, 118. Joined with adjectives: “one sore sick,” Ven. 702. “one full of despair,” Ven. 702 “as one with treasure laden,” Ven. 702 “to one so dear,” Gent. II, 7, 12. III, 1, 12. Err. V, 217 “(one wiser).” Merch. II, 1, 37 “(one un-worthier).” Shr. Ind. 1, 31. Wint. III, 2, 99. H6A III, 1, 44 etc. With substantives: “was reckoned one the wisest prince that there had reigned,” H8 II, 4, 48 (== one that was the wisest prince). “one mine ancient friend,” Tim. V, 2, 6. “a Frenchman, one an eminent monsieur,” Cymb. I, 6, 64. cf. “he is one the truest mannered,” Cymb. I, 6, 64 “or ever spake one the least word that might be to the prejudice of her present state,” H8 II, 4, 153.
Adjectively (applied to things as well as to persons): “under one arm the lusty courser's rein,” Ven. 31. “with one fair hand,” Ven. 31 Ven. 31 “she locks her lily fingers one in one,” Ven. 31 pay them (kisses) “one by one,” Ven. 31 “one midnight,” Tp. I, 2, 128. “taught thee each hour one thing or other,” Tp. I, 2, 128 “one of his pockets,” II, 1, 64. “one of their kind,” V, 23. “you shall one day find it,” Wiv. III, 3, 88. “I will marry one day,” Err. II, 1, 42. “the one . . . the other,” II, 2, 98. one (staff) “tipped with horn,” Ado V, 4, 125. “one of these days,” As I, 2, 91. “one night,” Tw. I, 3, 16. “one fire drives out one fire, one nail one nail,” Cor. IV, 7, 54 etc. == any? “it is not Caesar's natural vice to hate one great competitor,” Ant. I, 4, 3 (most M. Edd. our). cf. “'tis a great charge to come under one body's hand,” Wiv. I, 4, 105 (Simple's speech). Before names == a certain: “one Julia,” Gent. IV, 4, 124. “one Mistress Quickly,” Wiv. I, 2, 3. II, 2, 46. II, 2, 46 III, 5, 85. IV, 5, 33. V, 5, 175. Meas. II, 4, 18. III, 2, 210. IV, 3, 10. IV, 3, 10 Err. IV, 4, 135. V, 237. Ado V, 1, 317. LLL III, 122. IV, 1, 53. Mids. V, 157. Mids. V, 157 Merch. II, 2, 48. Merch. II, 2, 48 Shr. IV, 2, 96. All's II, 1, 43. IV, 3, 199. IV, 3, 199 Tw. V, 183. John V, 4, 40. H4A II, 4, 391. H8 II, 2, 122. Tit. IV, 2, 152. Rom. II, 4, 213. Hml. III, 2, 254. Oth. II, 1, 66. Ant. III, 7, 79. Supplying the place of a preceding substantive: nor thought I had one (a father) Tp. V, 191. “a witch and one so strong,” Tp. V, 191 I would have one (a dog) Gent. IV, 4, 13. “if there be a kind woman in Windsor, she is one,” Wiv. II, 2, 126 etc. Joined to adjectives by way of supplying a substantive: “so did this horse excel a common one,” Ven. 293. our dear love lose “name of single one,” Sonn. 39, 6. my good one (angel) 144, 14. the fairest one (daughter) “of three,” Pilgr. 211. “as if it had lungs and rotten ones,” Tp. II, 1, 47. Tp. II, 1, 47 II, 2, 21. V, 273. V, 273 Err. II, 2, 92. Err. II, 2, 92 Err. II, 2, 92 Mids. V, 322. Merch. V, 20. Shr. I, 2, 171. Wint. IV, 4, 78. H8 I, 3, 63. Lr. II, 1, 8. IV, 6, 99 etc. Peculiar passage: “a hundred mark is a long one for a poor lone woman to bear,” H4B II, 1, 35 (perhaps a long mark, i. e. sign or character. Some M. Edd. loan). Imparting, in this manner, to adjectives the nature of substantives: “my dear one,” Tp. I, 2, 17. “great ones,” Meas. II, 2, 59. Tw. I, 2, 33. Wint. II, 1, 128. Hml. III, 1, 196. Lr. II, 4, 75 “(the great one that goes up the hill).” V, 3, 18. Oth. I, 1, 8. III, 3, 273. “such a young one,” Shr. II, 236. All's V, 3, 303. John II, 521. H6B III, I, 215. H8 V, 3, 180. Tit. II, 3, 142. Mcb. IV, 2, 11. Cymb. IV, 2, 360. “fair one,” Meas. II, 3, 19. All's II, 1, 102. H5 V, 2, 120. H8 I, 4, 14. “a couple of quiet ones,” Shr. III, 2, 242. “good gentle one,” Tw. I, 5, 192. IV, 2, 37. “sweet one,” V, 221. “a forked one,” Wint. I, 2, 186. “come, little ones,” R2 V, 5, 15. H8 V, 5, 77. Mcb. IV, 2, 69. “the wicked ones,” H6B II, 1, 186. “their tender ones,” H6C II, 2, 28. “pretty ones,” R3 IV, 1, 101. Mcb. IV, 3, 216. “four throned ones,” H8 I, 1, 11. “the learned ones,” II, 2, 93. “a pair of strange ones,” Cor. II, 1, 89. “one good one,” II, 2, 83. Oth. II, 1, 212. “you married ones,” Cymb. V, 1, 2. “his dearest one,” V, 4, 61. “many a bold one,” V, 5, 71 etc. Similarly after pronouns: “no one,” Lucr. 792. Tw. II, 4, 58. R3 II, 1, 84. “every one,” Sonn. 53, 3. Tp. IV, 137. Wiv. V, 5, 255. Tit. V, 2, 202. “if that one be prodigal, bountiful they will him call,” Pilgr. 411. “each one,” Tp. IV, 46. Mcb. V, 8, 74. “such a one,” Wiv. III, 3, 122. Tw. I, 5, 252. “such an one,” Mcb. IV, 3, 66 etc. every one == every single, every: “every one fault seeming monstrous,” As III, 2, 372. no one == not one: “the owner of no one good quality,” All's III, 6, 12. “poor in no one fault,” Cor. II, 1, 20.
4) an indefinite person, == man, people (the speaker meaning especially himself): “one would swear he saw them quake,” Lucr. 1393. “one may enter at her window,” Gent. III, 1, 113. “one cannot climb it without danger of his life,” Gent. III, 1, 113 “as one should say,” IV, 4, 12. “if I have horns to make one mad,” Wiv. III, 5, 154. “not as one would say healthy,” Meas. I, 2, 55. “one would think,” IV, 3, 2. “as good cause as one would desire,” As III, 4, 5. “how might one do to lose it to her own liking,” All's I, 1, 163. “might have drawn one to a longer voyage,” Tw. III, 3, 7. “while one would wink,” V, 93 etc. Gen. one's: “who should be trusted, when one's own right hand is perjured to the bosom?” Gent. V, 4, 67. “some devils ask but the parings of one's nail,” Err. IV, 3, 72.
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