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Other (t' other or tother for “the other:” H4B II, 4, 92. H6B I, 3, 87. Cor. I, 1, 246. In Hml. II, 1, 56 Ff tother, Qq th' other; in Lr III, 7, 71 and Oth. IV, 1, 137 Qq tother, Ff the other. cf. The), 1) the second of two: under her o. (arm) “was the tender boy,” Ven. 32. Ven. 32 Ven. 32 “thy o. mouth,” Tp. II, 2, 98. “the one so like the o.” Err. I, 1, 52. “one of these men is Genus to the o.” V, 332. “my o. self,” R3 II, 2, 151. “to take the one the o.” Cor. IV, 4, 20. “each wreathed in the --'s arms,” Tit. II, 3, 25. “thou o. gold-bound brow,” Mcb. IV, 1, 114. “throw between them all the food thou hast, they'll grind the o.” Ant. III, 5, 16 (== each of them will grind the o. Most M. Edd. the one the o.). Cor. I, 1, 246. Lr. III, 7, 71 etc. etc. The article omitted: “each day still better --'s happiness,” R2 I, 1, 22 (or: --s'?). “both one and o. he denies me now,” Err. IV, 3, 86. “every letter he hath writ hath disvouched o.” Meas. IV, 4, 2 (== the others). “on one and o. side,” Meas. IV, 4, 2. “tilting one at --'s breast,” Oth. II, 3, 183. “every time gentler than o.” Caes. I, 2, 230. Particularly after each: “that which each to o. hath so strongly sworn,” LLL I, 1, 309. “wink each at o.” Mids. III, 2, 239. “gazed each on o.” R3 III, 7, 26. “men of heart looked wondering each at o.” Cor. V, 6, 100 (O. Edd. others). “make each to prescribe to o. as each --'s leech,” Tim. V, 4, 84. “her love to both would each to o. and all loves to both draw after her,” Ant. II, 2, 138 (cf. Each).
2) one except or besides that or those mentioned or understood: “his o. agents aim at like delight,” Ven. 400. “the o. four,” Ven. 400 “all o. eyes,” Ven. 400 “by any o. house or person,” Tp. I, 2, 42. “o. princess',” Tp. I, 2, 42 “there's o. business for thee,” Tp. I, 2, 42 Tp. I, 2, 42 “one thing or o.” Tp. I, 2, 42 “there is no o. shelter,” II, 2, 40. “th' o. two,” III, 2, 7. “taught thee one thing or o.” I, 2, 355. “o. men put forth their sons,” Gent. I, 3, 6. “by some device or o.” Err. I, 2, 95. “some gentleman or o.” Ado I, 1, 135. “some man or o. must present wall,” Mids. III, 1, 69. “with some delight or o.” Merch. II, 8, 53. “some indirect means or o.” As I, 1, 159. “three parts disbursed I duly, . . . . the o. part reserved I,” R2 I, 1, 128. “and such o. gambol faculties 'a has,” H4B II, 4, 272. “one time or o.” IV, 3, 32. “ransoming him, or pitying, threatening the o.” Cor. I, 6, 36 (== another). “so much for this: now shall you see the o.” Hml. V, 2, 1 (== the rest). “one gross crime or o.” Lr. I, 3, 4. and o. of his conquered kingdoms, Ant. . III, 6, 36. “let's have one o. gaudy night,” III, 13, 183 (== one more) etc. the o. day == lately: Wiv. I, 1, 294. Ado V, 1, 161. Tw. I, 5, 91. H4A I, 2, 95. H4B II, 4, 92. V, 1, 26. H6B I, 3, 87. H6B I, 3, 87 Troil. I, 2, 100. Tim. I, 2, 217. Hml. II, 1, 56. Oth. IV, 1, 137. this o. day, in the same sense: All's IV, 3, 226. Wint. V, 2, 140. H4A III, 3, 152. Tim. III, 6, 3. Tim. III, 6, 3 Lr. I, 2, 153. “the o. night:” H4A III, 3, 112. Before the possessive pronoun: “a thousand o. her defences,” Wiv. II, 2, 259. “with Poins and o. his continual followers,” H4B IV, 4, 53. “of o. your new pranks,” Lr. I, 4, 259. Substantively: some o. == somebody else: “knew of it by some o.” Ado II, 3, 161. “I will some o. be, some Florentine,” Shr. I, 1, 209. cf. “some say he is with the Emperor of Russia, o. some, he is in Rome,” Meas. III, 2, 94. “how happy some o'er o. some can be,” Mids. I, 1, 226. Plur. “--s:” Ven. 691. Ven. 691 Sonn. 142, 8. Err. II, 1, 111. John IV, 2, 164 (--s more) etc. Plural o. for --s: “may lend thee light, as thou dost lend to o.” Ven. 864. “some would sing, some o. in their bills would bring him mulberries,” Ven. 864 “as I all o. in all worths surmount,” Sonn. 62, 8. “every letter has disvouched o.” Meas. IV, 4, 2. “there's o. of our friends will greet us here,” IV, 5, 12. “some o. give me thanks for kindnesses,” Err. IV, 3, 5. “suggestions are to o. as to me,” LLL I, 1, 159 (Ff Q2 --s). “awaking when the o. do,” Mids. IV, 1, 71. “and o. of such vinegar aspect,” Merch. I, 1, 54. “and her withholds from me and o. more,” Shr. I, 2, 121. “this matched with o.” H4A I, 1, 49. “and then come in the o.” II, 4, 202. “and o. of your highness' privy council,” H6B II, 1, 176. “many o. of noble fame,” R3 IV, 5, 13 (Qq moe). “sphered amidst the o.” Troil. I, 3, 91. “call Claudius and some o. of my men,” Caes. IV, 3, 242. “I myself have all the o.” Mcb. I, 3, 14. “o. of your insolent retinue do hourly carp,” Lr. I, 4, 221. “o. of them may have crooked noses,” Cymb. III, 1, 37. “civility not seen from o.” IV, 2, 179.
3) different: “thy heart in o. place,” Sonn. 93, 4. “I am for o. than for dancing measures,” As V, 4, 199. “o. gold, less fine in carat, is more precious,” H4B IV, 5, 162 etc. Remarkable passages: “they can be meek that have no o. cause,” Err. II, 1, 33. “free from o. misbegotten hate,” R2 I, 1, 33 (i. e. hate of a different nature and misbegotten). “all these are portable, with o. graces weighed,” Mcb. IV, 3, 90 (i. e. with other things, that are graces). “to preserve this vessel for my lord from any o. foul unlawful touch,” Oth. IV, 2, 84 (Qq hated). Mcb. I, 7, 28.*
Adverbially, == otherwise (German anders), and no o. == not otherwise: “were she o. than she is,” Ado I, 1, 176. “nor met with fortune o. than at feasts,” John V, 2, 58. “any that calls me o. than Lord Mortimer,” H6B IV, 6, 6. “he had a black mouth that said o. of him,” H8 I, 3, 58. “before you find it o.” Cor. IV, 6, 102. “who dares receive it o.” Mcb. I, 7, 77. “if you think o.” Oth. IV, 2, 13. who can be o. (than merry) “in this royal presence?” Per. II, 3, 49. “it is no o.” Meas. IV, 3, 122. “I believe no o.” V, 60. “being no o. but as she is,” Ado I, 1, 177. “can't no o., but, I your daughter, he must be my brother?” All's I, 3, 171. “he hopes it is no o.” Troil. II, 3, 119. “'tis no o.” Mcb. III, 4, 97. “I think it be no o. but e'en so,” Hml. I, 1, 108. “if 'twere no o.” Oth. IV, 2, 168. -- Substantively, o. == any thing else, no o. == nothing else: “do the wise think them o.?” LLL III, 81. “he shall suppose no o. but that he is carried . . . .,” All's III, 6, 27. “the duke knows him for no o. but a poor officer of mine,” IV, 3, 225. “if you say I am any o. than an honest man,” H4B I, 2, 98. “we hope no o. from your majesty,” V, 2, 62. “not to be o. than one thing,” Cor. IV, 7, 42. “we learn no o. but the confident tyrant keeps still in Dunsinane,” Mcb. V, 4, 8.
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