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Pinch, vb. 1) to squeeze with the fingers: Tp. I, 2, 328. II, 2, 4. V, 276. Wiv. IV, 4, 57. Wiv. IV, 4, 57 IV, 6, 44. V, 5, 49. V, 5, 49 V, 5, 49 103 -- V, 5, 49 Err. II, 2, 194. All's IV, 3, 140. Wint I, 2, 115. IV, 4, 622. Strange expression: “let the bloat king tempt you again to bed, p. wanton on your cheek, call you his mouse,” Hml. III, 4, 183. Should it be pinch-wanton (dally with pinches)? or pinch, wanton on your cheek?
2) to gripe and bite: “as a bear, encompassed round with dogs, who having --ed a few and made them cry,” H6C II, 1, 16 (cf. the subst. in H6A IV, 2, 49).
3) to discolour as by squeezing: “the air hath --ed the lily tincture of her face,” Gent. IV, 4, 160 (cf. “with Phoebus' amorous --es black,” Ant. I, 5, 28).
4) to pain, to afflict: “the earth is with a kind of colic --ed and vexed,” H4A III, 1, 29. Cor. II, 1, 82. “the pox --es the other,” H4B I, 2, 258. “in this our --ing cave,” Cymb. III, 3, 38 (very cold). “O majesty! when thou dost p. thy bearer,” H4B IV, 5, 29 (meaning the crown pressing the head). “here's the pang that --es,” H8 II, 3, 1. “to gall and p. this Bolingbroke,” H4A I, 3, 229. “thou art --ed for it now,” Tp. V, 74.
5) to make ridiculous, to serve a trick: “have I --ed you, Signior Gremio?” Shr. II, 373. “I remain a --ed thing,” Wint. II, 1, 51. “as they p. one another by the disposition,” Ant. II, 7, 7.
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