previous next
Pity, subst. 1) compassion: Ven. 95. Ven. 95 Ven. 95 Lucr. 468. Lucr. 468 Lucr. 468 Sonn. 111, 14. 112, 1. 142, 11. Tp. I, 2, 150. Tp. I, 2, 150 Gent. II, 3, 12. Meas. II, 2, 99. III, 2, 223. Err. I, 1, 10. Merch. IV, 1, 5. As II, 7, 123. H6B III, 1, 125. H6B III, 1, 125 V, 2, 56. H6C II, 6, 26. Caes. III, 1, 171 etc. Plur. “--es:” Wint. II, 1, 110. the one has my p. (== I pity him) Meas. IV, 2, 64. “this is full of p.” H8 II, 1, 137 (== moves compassion). an eye of p. == a compassionate eye, Merch. IV, 1, 27. Wint. III, 2, 124. a thing of p. == to be pitied, Cymb. V, 4, 47. for p. == out of compassion: Ven. 577. Ado V, 4, 93. Wint. III, 3, 78. Cor. I, 3, 96. Tit. III, 1, 2. in p., in the same sense: R2 V, 1, 9. “in p. of:” Ven. 1091. As I, 2, 170. H6A II, 5, 87. H6C II, 2, 161. Tim. V, 1, 179. Lr. IV, 5, 12. “out of p.” H8 III, 2, 382. “to give p.” All's I, 3, 219. “to have p.” Compl. 178. Tp. I, 2, 474. Mids. III, 2, 241. All's II, 3, 254. H8 IV, 2, 139. “to take p.” Pilgr. 392. Meas. I, 2, 112. Err. IV, 3, 26. Ado II, 3, 271. H5 III, 3, 28. With “of:” Ven. 1091. Compl. 178. Ado II, 3, 271. As I, 2, 170. All's II, 3, 254. H5 III, 3, 28. H6A II, 5, 87. H6C II, 2, 161. Tit. III, 1, 2. Lr. IV, 5, 12. Per. I, 2, 29. With “on:” Pilgr. 392. Meas. I, 2, 112. Err. IV, 3, 26 (in these three passages to take p. on). “have some p. upon my women,” H8 IV, 2, 139. With to: “I myself find in myself no p. to myself,” R3 V, 3, 203. “out of our easiness and childish p. to one man's honour,” H8 V, 3, 25. “p. to the general wrong of Rome,” Caes. III, 1, 170.
For p., an exclamation not only of distress, but of regretful surprise (cf. the German dass sich Gott erbarm'!): “alack, for p.! I, not remembering how I cried out then, will cry it o'er again,” Tp. I, 2, 132. “ay me, for p.!” Mids. II, 2, 147. where -- O for p.! -- we shall much disgrace the name of Agincourt, H5IV Chor. Mids. II, 2, 147 “O p., sir, where is the patience now,” Lr. III, 6, 61.
2) a ground or subject of compassion: “and there sung the dolefullest ditty, that to hear it was great p.” Pilgr. 384. “it were p. you should get your living by reckoning,” LLL V, 2, 497. “though it be p. so see such a sight, it well becomes the ground,” As III, 2, 255. “which though it be great p., yet it is necessary,” Wint. IV, 4, 804. “were it not p. that this goodly boy should lose his birthright?” H6C II, 2, 34. III, 2, 31. “it is a p. would move a monster,” H8 II, 3, 10. “their story is no less in p. than his glory,” Ant. V, 2, 365. it is p. == it is to be regretted: “that were p.” Merch. II, 2, 209. followed by an indicative: “'tis p. he is not honest,” All's III, 5, 85. Wint. II, 1, 68. “'tis p. that thou livest to walk,” Err. V, 27. “'tis p. she lacks instructions,” Wint. IV, 4, 592. by the impf. subj.: “'tis p. -- What's p.? That wishing well had not a body in't,” All's I, 1, 193. “what p. is it that he had not so dressed his land,” R2 III, 4, 55. by should: “'tis p. love should be so contrary,” Gent. IV, 4, 88. “'twere p. two such friends should be long foes,” V, 4, 118. John II, 507. H4A I, 3, 59 “(great p.).” R3 I, 1, 132. Tit. II, 3, 71. Oth. II, 3, 143 “(great p.).” Cymb. I, 4, 43 etc. by but, == that not: “p. but he were a king,” Pilgr. 414; cf. Verges' confused speech in Ado III, 3, 2. by an inf.: “'twere p. to sunder them,” H6C IV, 1, 22. Ant. I, 2, 142. by of: “it is p. of her life,” Meas. II, 1, 77. II, 3, 42. Mids. III, 1, 44. V, 229 (on == of). Tw. II, 5, 14. Oth. II, 3, 130. Ant. I, 4, 71. “and yet the p. of it,” Oth. IV, 1, 206. “the more p.” As I, 2, 92. “the more the p.” Mids. III, 1, 148. H4A II, 4, 514.
hide Dictionary Entry Lookup
Use this tool to search for dictionary entries in all lexica.
Search for in
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: