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Plain, adj. 1) even, level, smooth: “the p. bald pate of father Time,” Err. II, 2, 71; i. e. not hairy; cf. “we are but p. fellows. A lie; you are rough and hairy,” Wint. IV, 4, 743. “follow me then to --er ground,” Mids. III, 2, 404. “p. as way to parish church,” As II, 7, 52. “on the p. masonry,” All's II, 1, 31. “this sandy plot is p.” Tit. IV, 1, 69. cf. Merch. III, 1, 13.
2) open, clear, easily understood, evident: “all this dumb play had his acts made p. with tears,” Ven. 359. “that my love may appear p. and free,” Gent. V, 4, 82. “a rule as p.” Err. II, 2, 70. LLL III, 82. IV, 3, 121. Mids. V, 129. As II, 7, 52. All's V, 3, 318. H6A III, 1, 200. H6B II, 2, 53. Troil. IV, 4, 31. Tit. II, 3, 301. Oth. II, 1, 321.
3) simple: “in true p. words,” Sonn. 82, 12. “the lesson is but p.” Ven. 407. “a p. kerchief,” Wiv. III, 3, 62. “'tis a p. case,” Err. IV, 3, 22. “I meant p. holy-thistle,” Ado III, 4, 80. “the p. form of marriage,” IV, 1, 2. “plantain, a p. plantain,” LLL III, 74. “that some p. man recount their purposes,” V, 2, 176. “p. statute-caps,” V, 2, 176 “honest p. words best pierce the ear of grief,” V, 2, 176 “the p. highway of talk,” Merch. III, 1, 13. “as you would say in p. terms,” II, 2, 68. “understand a p. man in his p. meaning,” III, 5, 63. “with all brief and p. conveniency,” IV, 1, 82. “thus in p. terms,” Shr. II, 271. “the p. single vow that is vowed true,” All's IV, 2, 22. it (the song) “is old and p.” Tw. II, 4, 44. “honest p. men,” Wint. IV, 4, 824. “we are but p. fellows,” Wint. IV, 4, 824 “p. old form,” John IV, 2, 22. “how a p. tale shall put you down,” H4A II, 4, 281. of so easy and so p. a stop, H4B Ind. H4A II, 4, 281 “in p. shock and even play of battle,” H5 IV, 8, 114. “such a p. king,” V, 2, 128. “I speak to thee p. soldier,” V, 2, 128 “take a fellow of p. and uncoined constancy,” V, 2, 128 “p. proceeding” H6B II, 2, 53. “cannot a p. man live and think no harm,” R3 I, 3, 51. “in p. terms tell her my loving tale,” R3 IV, 4, 359 (Ff plainly to her). “p. and not honest is too harsh a style,” R3 IV, 4, 359 “that's the p. truth,” H8 V, 3, 71. “be p., good son, and homely in thy drift,” Rom. II, 3, 55. “and, but in the --er and simpler kind of people, the deed of saying is quite out of use,” Tim. V, 1, 27. “a p. blunt man,” Caes. III, 2, 222. “in p. terms,” Hml. I, 3, 132. “deliver a p. message bluntly,” Lr. I, 4, 35.
4) artless, without disguise, frank, honest: “such signs of truth in his p. face she spied,” Lucr. 1532. “p. and holy innocence,” Tp. III, 1, 82. “in p. dealing, I shall have you whipt,” Meas. II, 1, 263. “do I not in --est truth tell you, I do not love you?” Mids. II, 1, 200. “I was always p. with you,” Merch. III, 5, 4. V, 166. Wint. I, 2, 265. IV, 4, 174. “p. well-meaning soul,” R2 II, 1, 128. “p. and right must my possession be,” H4B IV, 5, 223. “to be p.” H6B I, 2, 96. H6C III, 3, 19. “simple p. Clarence,” R3 I, 1, 118. “the --est harmless creature,” III, 5, 25. “shall I be p.? I wish the bastards dead,” IV, 2, 18. “the moral of my wit is `p. and true',” Troil. IV, 4, 110. “laid falsely in the p. way of his merit,” Cor. III, 1, 61. “there are no tricks in p. and simple faith,” Caes. IV, 2, 22. “'tis my occupation to be p.” Lr. II, 2, 98. Lr. II, 2, 98 Lr. II, 2, 98 Lr. II, 2, 98 “chill be p. with you,” IV, 6, 248.
5) mere, bare, nothing else but: “one of them is a p. fish,” Tp. V, 266. “Judas Maccabaeus clipt is p. Judas,” LLL V, 2, 603. “he speaks p. cannon fire,” John II, 462. “it is p. pocketing up of wrongs,” H5 III, 2, 54. “the p. devil and dissembling looks,” R3 I, 2, 237. “a p. knave,” Lr. II, 2, 118.
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