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Please, 1) to gratify, to be to the taste of a person; absol.: my project was to p. Tp. Epil. Ado II, 1, 355 “that sport best --s,” LLL V, 2, 517. Mids. III, 1, 10. As Epil. Mids. III, 1, 10 Wint. IV, 4, 338. Oth. IV, 1, 222 etc. Transitively: “a nurse's song ne'er --d her babe so well,” Ven. 974. “if my slight Muse do p. these curious days,” Sonn. 38, 13. 147, 4. Tp. I, 2, 85. Gent. II, 1, 137. Gent. II, 1, 137 Gent. II, 1, 137 Wiv. III, 3, 189. Meas. II, 4, 32. IV, 1, 13. Err. II, 1, 56. Mids. III, 2, 120. As I, 2, 240. III, 5, 112. V, 2, 127. Shr. IV, 4, 39. Tw. III, 4, 23. Tw. III, 4, 23 V, 417. H4B V, 5, 114. Ant. IV, 10, 2 etc. Passively: if your honour seem but --d, Ven. Dedic. Ant. IV, 10, 2 “if --d themselves, others they think delight in such-like circumstance,” Ven. 843.
2) to gratify, to give pleasure, to content, to amuse: to p. him (the day) “thou art bright,” Sonn. 28, 9. “how many tales to p. me hath she coined,” Pilgr. 93. “you may . . . . much p. the absent duke, if peradventure he shall ever return to have hearing of this business,” Meas. III, 1, 209. “go home with it and p. your wife withal,” Err. III, 2, 178. “and I will p. you what you will demand,” IV, 4, 52. “he both --s men and angers them,” Ado II, 1, 146. “how to p. the eye indeed by fixing it upon a fairer eye,” LLL I, 1, 80. “my voice is ragged: I know I cannot p. you,” As II, 5, 16. “more at your request than to p. myself,” As II, 5, 16 “he cut it to p. himself,” V, 4, 78. “till I have --d my discontented peers,” John IV, 2, 126 (== appeased, reconciled). dost p. thyself in it (a villain's office)? Tim. IV, 3, 238. “do not p. sharp fate to grace it with your sorrows,” Ant. IV, 14, 135. “p. your thoughts in feeding them with those my former fortunes,” IV, 15, 52. “perhaps they will but p. themselves upon her,” Per. IV, 1, 101 (== satisfy their desire). --d == gratified, contented, happy: “grief best is --d with grief's society,” Lucr. 1111. “who in despite of view is --d to dote,” Sonn. 141, 4. “she would be best --d to be so angered with another letter,” Gent. I, 2, 102. “he will scarce be --d withal,” II, 7, 67. these (heaven and earth) “are --d,” V, 4, 80. “I am best --d with that,” LLL V, 2, 229. Merch. III, 2, 136. “the buzzing --d multitude,” Merch. III, 2, 136 “so you stand --d withal,” Merch. III, 2, 136 “I thank you for your wish and am well --d to wish it back on you,” III, 4, 43. As II, 5, 43. Shr. II, 305. IV, 4, 107. Wint. IV, 4, 495. John II, 531. IV, 1, 86. R2 II, 1, 187. IV, 217. V, 5, 40. H6B I, 1, 218. IV, 10, 25. Troil. IV, 1, 64 etc. == in good humour, not angry: “be not angry; I am --d again,” H6B I, 2, 55. “Herod of Jewry dare not look upon you but when you are well --d,” Ant. III, 3, 4.
3) Used as a word of ceremony, == to like, to vouchsafe, to allow; a) in the passive: “wilt thou be --d to hearken to the suit?” Tp. III, 2, 44. “if you be --d, retire into my cell,” IV, 161. “an the heavens were so --d that thou wert my bastard,” LLL V, 1, 79. “if I be --d to give ten thousand ducats to have it baned,” Merch. IV, 1, 45. “if the heavens had been --d, would we had so ended,” Tw. II, 1, 21. “be --d that I shake off these names,” V, 76. “be --d then to pay that duty,” John II, 246. “if heaven be --d that you must use me ill,” IV, 1, 55. “which if He be --d I shall perform,” H4A III, 2, 154. “the king is --d you shall to the Tower,” H8 I, 1, 213. “you may be --d to catch at mine intent by what did here befall me,” Ant. II, 2, 41. “be --d to tell us,” II, 6, 29. “be --d awhile,” Cymb. V, 5, 356 (== vouchsafe to listen to what I have to say) etc. The participle adjectively: “--d Fortune does of Marcus Crassus' death make me revenger,” Ant. III, 1, 2 (== it is the pleasure of Fortune to make me etc.).
b) in the active voice (the third person of the present please or pleases, indiscriminately); 1) used personally: “it rested in your grace to unloose this tied-up justice when you --d,” Meas. I, 3, 32. “let me say no, my liege, an if you p.” LLL I, 1, 50. “if you p. to shoot another arrow,” Merch. I, 1, 147. “if you had --d to have defended it,” V, 204. “as I p.” Shr. IV, 3, 80. “if he p., my hand is ready,” V, 2, 178. “where we p. to have it grow,” All's II, 3, 164. “if she --d,” III, 5, 71. “when he p. again to be himself,” H4A I, 2, 224. “when he p. to make commotion,” H6B III, 1, 29. “command in Anjou what your honour --s,” H6A V, 3, 147. Gent. IV, 4, 46. Meas. III, 1, 51. Ado II, 1, 95. Ado II, 1, 95 Merch. II, 6, 23. Shr. III, 1, 20. III, 2, 211. III, 2, 211 IV, 4, 32. As I, 1, 70. II, 7, 49. V, 2, 65. All's II, 3, 64. All's II, 3, 64 Wint. IV, 4, 532. John IV, 2, 3. H4B V, 2, 77. H6A III, 2, 110. V, 1, 24. V, 4, 173. R3 I, 2, 176. III, 2, 99 (Ff your lordship p. to ask; Qq it please your l.). H8 I, 1, 170. II, 2, 50. Tit. IV, 2, 168. Hml. III, 2, 76. Ant. III, 11, 64. V, 1, 9. V, 2, 18 etc. Partic. --ing == willing: “relish your nimble notes to --ing ears,” Lucr. 1126. (such as will hear them). Peculiar passage: “heaven hath --d it so, to punish me with this,” Hml. III, 4, 173.
2) impersonally (to before a following infinitive inserted or omitted indiscriminately): “will't p. you taste of what is here?” Tp. III, 3, 42. “will't p. you go?” Gent. I, 2, 140. “to-morrow, may it p. you, Don Alphonso with other gentlemen . . . are journeying,” I, 3, 39. I, 3, 39 “will't p. your worship to come in?” Wiv. I, 1, 275. “the better that it --s your worship to ask,” I, 4, 144. Meas. III, 2, 209. IV, 1, 59. “I had rather it would p. you I might be whipt,” V, 511. “p. it your grace lead on,” Ado I, 1, 160. “her hair shall be of what colour it p. God,” II, 3, 37. “father, as it p. you,” II, 1, 56. II, 1, 56 “it --s your worship to say so,” III, 5, 21. “p. it your majesty command me any service?” LLL V, 2, 311. “it --th his greatness to impart,” V, 1, 112. “it --s him to call you so,” As IV, 1, 66. “howe'er it --s you to take it so,” All's V, 3, 88. “it --d your highness to overbear it,” John IV, 2, 36. “it --d your majesty to turn your looks from us,” H4A V, 1, 30. “one it --s me to call my friend,” H4B II, 2, 44. “as long as it --s his grace,” H5 IV, 7, 114. Mids. V, 359. Shr. Ind. 2, 2. III, 2, 20. IV, 4, 1. All's III, 6, 117. Tw. II, 3, 107. V, 119. Wint. IV, 4, 457. H4B IV, 1, 2. H6A I, 2, 74. H6B II, 4, 80. R3 I, 2, 211. III, 1, 136. III, 2, 99. H8 II, 4, 114. Ant. II, 5, 41. “what p. yourself,” Err. III, 2, 175. “in what part of your body --th me,” Merch. I, 3, 152. to like as much of this play as p. you, As Epil. Merch. I, 3, 152 “may direct his course as p. himself,” R3 II, 2, 129 etc. Conditionally; with an: “not so, an 't p. your worship,” Wiv. II, 2, 37. “yes, an 't p. you, sir,” Meas. II, 1, 205. Merch. II, 2, 61. H6A V, 4, 10. H6B II, 4, 76. With if: “where, if it p. you, you may intercept him,” Gent. III, 1, 43. Meas. II, 1, 47. Meas. II, 1, 47 V, 449. Ado III, 2, 87. Merch. I, 3, 33. As I, 2, 120 etc. Oftenest with so: “so it p. thee hold that nothing me a something sweet to thee,” Sonn. 136, 11. “on a trice, so p. you, were we divided from them,” Tp. V, 238. “so p. you, this friar hath been with him,” Meas. III, 2, 224. LLL II, 164. Mids. V, 106. Merch. IV, 1, 2. Merch. IV, 1, 2 As I, 1, 97. I, 2, 166. Shr. Ind. 1, 82. I, 2, 276. Tw. V, 324. H5 V, 2, 352. H6B I, 1, 39. II, 3, 51. II, 4, 17. III, 1, 315. V, 1, 76. H6C II, 6, 98. Tim. V, 1, 162. Caes. III, 1, 140. Lr. IV, 7, 17. Cymb. IV, 2, 394 etc. The conjunction omitted: “p. you, farther,” Tp. I, 2, 65. “p. you, sir, do not omit the heavy offer of it,” II, 1, 193. V, 318. Gent. I, 2, 7. I, 3, 73. II, 1, 120. II, 1, 120 IV, 4, 126. V, 4, 168. Meas. II, 4, 64. Err. I, 2, 27. Wint. II, 1, 131. V, 1, 180. H6C III, 2, 78. Cymb. III, 4, 18. “p. but your honour hear me,” Meas. II, 2, 28. “p. your lordship, here is the wine,” Tim. III, 1, 32. “p. it you, as much in private,” LLL V, 2, 240. H4B IV, 4, 101. “p. it your grace, there is a messenger,” Gent. III, 1, 52. “p. it this matron to eat with us,” All's III, 5, 100. H6B I, 3, 184. IV, 9, 23. Cor. V, 6, 140. “--d you to do't at peril of your soul,” Meas. II, 4, 67. Sometimes the form of the indicative employed: “--th you walk with me down to his house, I will discharge my bond,” Err. IV, 1, 12. “--th your lordship to meet his grace,” H4B IV, 1, 225. “--th your grace to answer them directly,” IV, 2, 52. “--th your grace to appoint . . . ., we will . . . .,” H5 V, 2, 78. “--th your majesty to give me leave, I'll muster up my friends,” R3 IV, 4, 488 (Qq please it). “--th your highness, ay,” Cymb. I, 5, 5. P. you or so p. you, sometimes a courteous answer in the affirmative: “will you hear the letter? So p. you,” As IV, 3, 37. “who's there? my woman Helen? P. you, madam,” Cymb. II, 2, 1. “darest thou resolve to kill a friend of mine? P. you, but I had rather kill two enemies,” R3 IV, 2, 71 (Qq ay, my lord). cf. Ado III, 2, 87 and H5 V, 2, 352. Similarly: “is it yourself? If you shall p. so, pilgrim,” All's III, 5, 47.
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