previous next
Power (sometimes dissyll.; f. i. Merch. IV, 1, 241. H4B IV, 1, 177. R3 IV, 4, 480. Rom. V, 3, 93), 1) force, strength, ability, whether bodily or intellectual, physical or moral: thy (death's) “p. had lost his p.” Ven. 944. “when more is felt than one hath p. to tell,” Lucr. 1288. “he hath no p. to ask her how she fares,” Lucr. 1288 “brass, nor stone, nor earth . . . . but sad mortality o'ersways their p.” Sonn. 65, 2. “darkening thy p. to give base subjects light,” 100, 4. “use p. with p. and slay me not by art,” 139, 4 (cf. Cor. II, 3, 4). “had I been any god of p.” Tp. I, 2, 10. “his art is of such p.” Tp. I, 2, 10 “till mine enemy has more p.” Tp. I, 2, 10 and deal in her (the moon's) “command without her p.” V, 271 (without being subject to the pernicious influence of the moon). “assay the p. you have,” Meas. I, 4, 76. “devices, which shall then have no p. to stand against us,” IV, 4, 15. “to your p. I'll yield,” Err. III, 2, 40. “whose edge hath p. to cut,” LLL II, 50. “all the p. thereof it doth apply to prove,” V, 2, 77. “ere a man hath p. to say Behold,” Mids. I, 1, 147. “your p. to draw,” II, 1, 197. “all the p. this charm doth owe,” II, 2, 79. “Dian's bud o'er Cupid's flower hath such force and blessed p.” IV, 1, 79. “there is no p. in the tongue of man to alter me,” Merch. IV, 1, 241. “the sweet p. of music,” V, 79. “the p. of fancy,” As III, 5, 29. “be able for thine enemy rather in p. than use,” All's I, 1, 75. (a medicine) “chief in p.” II, 1, 115. “I will prove so to my p.” Wint. V, 2, 182 (to the best of my ability); cf. Cor. II, 1, 262. “to bear above our p.” John V, 6, 38. “beyond his p. to build it,” H4B I, 3, 59. “knit our --s to the arm of peace,” IV, 1, 177. “I have no p. to let her pass,” H6A V, 3, 60. “the eternal God, whose name and p. thou tremblest at,” H6B I, 4, 28. “I have not the p. to muzzle him,” H8 I, 1, 121. “wisdom o'ertopping woman's p.” II, 4, 88. “entered me with a splitting p.” II, 4, 88 “we have p. in ourselves to do it, but it is a p. that we have no p. to do,” Cor. II, 3, 4 (we are legally authorized to do it, but it would be immoral to make use of our authority). “what a mental p. this eye shoots forth,” Tim. I, 1, 31. “be of any p. to expel sickness,” III, 1, 65. “his whole action grows not in the p. on't,” Ant. III, 7, 70 (does not rest on that which makes its strength) etc. etc.
2) authority, dominion, sway, influence: “a prince of p.” Tp. I, 2, 55. “what my p. might else exact,” Tp. I, 2, 55 “and given his deputation all the organs of our p.” Meas. I, 1, 22. “a p. I have, but of what strength and nature I am not yet instructed,” Meas. I, 1, 22 “my absolute p. and place here in Vienna,” I, 3, 13. “if p. change purpose,” I, 3, 13 “which he spurs on his p. to qualify in others,” IV, 2, 85. “there to give up their p.” IV, 3, 137. “advance their pride against that p. that bred it,” Ado III, 1, 11. “if law, authority and p. deny not,” Merch. III, 2, 291. “upon my p. I may dismiss this court,” IV, 1, 104. “his sceptre shows the force of temporal p.” IV, 1, 104 “earthly p. doth then show likest God's,” IV, 1, 104 “there is no p. in Venice can alter a decree,” IV, 1, 104 “I must produce my p.” All's II, 3, 157. “what his hatred would effect wants not a minister in his p.” H8 I, 1, 108. “by commission and main p.” II, 2, 7. “my p. rained honour on you,” III, 2, 185. “every thing includes itself in p., p. into will,” Troil. I, 3, 119. “our office may during his p. go sleep,” Cor. II, 1, 239. seeking means to pluck away their (the people's) “p.” III, 3, 96. “in the name o' the people, and in the p. of us the tribunes, we banish him,” III, 3, 96 “ere thou hadst p.” Tim. V, 4, 15. “I could with barefaced p. sweep him from my sight,” Mcb. III, 1, 119. “giving to you no further personal p. to business with the king,” Hml. I, 2, 36. “my powers are crescent, and my auguring hope says it will come to the full,” Ant. II, 1, 10 etc. etc. With in: “by that fatherly and kindly p. that you have in her,” Ado IV, 1, 75. “you have p. in me as in a kinsman,” R3 III, 1, 109. With of: “by the sovereign p. you have of us,” Hml. II, 2, 27. “my mother, having p. of his testiness,” Cymb. IV, 1, 22. With on: “unless the next word have some malignant p. upon my life,” Gent. III, 1, 238. “death hath had no p. yet upon thy beauty,” Rom. V, 3, 93. “no man shall e'er have p. upon thee,” Mcb. V, 3, 7. “I have no p. upon you,” Ant. I, 3, 23. “the p. that I have on you is to spare you,” Cymb. V, 5, 418. With over: not age, but sorrow, over me hath p. Compl, Cymb. V, 5, 418 “the rabble, o'er whom I give thee p.” Tp. IV, 1, 38. “thou hadst but p. over his mortal body,” R3 I, 2, 47 (cf. Mids. IV, 1, 79). With unto: “his p. unto Octavia,” Ant. II, 2, 146 (cf. Hml. I, 2, 36). in or within the p. of == at the discretion or disposal of: Sonn. 126, 1. Tp. I, 2, 450. III, 3, 90. LLL II, 51. Mids. I, 1, 50. Merch. I, 3, 93. All's II, 1, 197. III, 6, 33. Wint. II, 3, 26. H6A I, 4, 37. Mcb. IV, 3, 119 etc.
3) a supernatural agent having dominion over man: “having solicited the eternal p. that his foul thoughts might compass his fair fair,” Lucr. 345. “from what p. hast thou this powerful might,” Sonn. 150, 1. “for which foul deeds the --s have incensed the seas,” Tp. III, 3, 73. “some heavenly p. guide us,” V, 105. Gent. II, 6, 4. Meas. V, 374. Err. IV, 3, 44. Mids. I, 1, 59. IV, 1, 169. Merch. IV, 1, 292. John V, 7, 75. H6C IV, 6, 68. Tit. III, 1, 209. Caes. V, 1, 107. Mcb. IV, 1, 69. IV, 3, 238. Lr. I, 1, 210. Oth. II, 1, 197. Ant. II, 1, 6 etc. etc.
4) vital organ, physical or intellectual function: “and therein heartens up his servile --s,” Lucr. 295. these rebel --s that thee (the soul) “array,” Sonn. 146, 2. “the sudden surprise of my --s,” Wiv. V, 5, 131. “courses as swift as thought in every p., and gives to every p. a double p.” LLL IV, 3, 330. LLL IV, 3, 330 “to flatter up these --s of mine with rest,” V, 2, 824. “all my --s, address your love and might to honour Helen,” Mids. II, 2, 143. “there is such confusion in my --s,” Merch. III, 2, 179. “thy conceit is nearer death than thy --s,” As II, 6, 9. “sorrow and grief have vanquished all my --s,” H6B II, 1, 183. “whose dismal tune bereft my vital --s,” III, 2, 41. “your brain and every function of your p.” H8 III, 2, 187. “too sharp in sweetness for the capacity of my ruder --s,” Troil. III, 2, 26. “my --s do their bestowing lose,” Troil. III, 2, 26 “when we will tempt the frailty of our --s,” IV, 4, 98. “as if a god were slily crept into his human --s and gave him graceful posture,” Cor. II, 1, 236. “my operant --s their functions leave to do,” Hml. III, 2, 184. “what his every action speaks in every p. that moves,” Ant. III, 12, 36 etc.
5) armed force: “the p. of Greece,” Lucr. 1368. “shall we knit our --s,” John II, 398. “never such a p. was levied,” IV, 2, 110. V, 5, 18. V, 6, 39. R2 II, 2, 124. III, 2, 63. H4A IV, 1, 132. H4B IV, 4, 5. H6A I, 4, 103. II, 2, 33. III, 3, 83. IV, 2, 8. IV, 3, 4. H6B IV, 4, 40. H6C V, 2, 31. R3 IV, 3, 48. IV, 4, 449. IV, 4, 449 V, 3, 10. Cor. I, 2, 32. Tit. IV, 4, 63. Mcb. IV, 3, 236. Ant. III, 7, 58 etc. etc. The plur. form in the sense of the sing.: “I'll send those --s o'er to your majesty,” John III, 3, 70. “those --s of France,” IV, 2, 129. “the Dauphin and his --s,” V, 1, 32. R2 V, 3, 140. H4A I, 3, 262. H6A III, 3, 30. V, 2, 5. H6B IV, 9, 10. V, 1, 44. Tim. V, 4, 52. Hml. IV, 4, 9. Cymb. III, 5, 24 etc.
Seemingly abstr. pro concr.: “most p. to do most harm, least knowing ill,” LLL II, 58 (== a man most able?). “and now are mounted where --s are your retainers,” H8 II, 4, 113 (persons of the highest authority?).
hide Dictionary Entry Lookup
Use this tool to search for dictionary entries in all lexica.
Search for in
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: