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Pray, 1) to ask earnestly, to entreat; absol.: “I p. now, keep below,” Tp. I, 1, 12. “pardon the fault, I p.” Gent. I, 2, 40. “give us leave, I p., a while,” III, 1, 1. “how I --ed and kneeled,” Meas. V, 93. “tell me this, I p.” Err. I, 2, 53 etc. etc. With for: “the guilty rebel for remission --s,” Lucr. 714. “a conqueror that will p. in aid for kindness, where he for grace is knelled to,” Ant. V, 2, 27 (to p. in aid, a law-term, == to call in for help one who has interest in the cause). With a clause: “and --s that you will hie you home,” Err. I, 2, 90 etc. I often omitted before it: “p., set it down,” Tp. III, 1, 18. “p., tell me that,” Gent. III, 1, 123. Elliptically: “to what, I p.?” Meas. I, 2, 48 (i. e. I p. you to tell me). “I p., sir, why am I beaten?” Err. II, 2, 39. “what are you, I p., but . . .” H6A III, 1, 43. “what, I p., is Margaret more than that?” V, 5, 36 etc. Transitively: “I p. you, hence,” Ven. 382. “I p. thee, mark me,” Tp. I, 2, 67. Tp. I, 2, 67 Tp. I, 2, 67 III, 3, 109. Gent. I, 3, 89. III, 1, 239. Meas. IV, 1, 16. Shr. IV, 4, 21 etc. I omitted: “no, p. thee,” Tp. I, 2, 371. III, 1, 15. IV, 194. V, 167. Meas. II, 2, 2 etc. Elliptically: “I p. you, sir, of what disposition was the duke?” Meas. III, 2, 244. “I p. you, is Signor Mountanto returned?” Ado I, 1, 30. “I p. you, how many hath he killed?” Ado I, 1, 30 “but, I p. you, who is his companion?” Ado I, 1, 30 “p. you, where lies Sir Proteus?” Gent. IV, 2, 137. “p. you, how goes the world,” Tim. II, 2, 35. “she is now the wife of Marcus Antonius. P. ye, sir? 'Tis true,” Ant. II, 6, 120 (i. e. tell me if you are in earnest) etc. A clause following: “the poor fool --s her that he may depart,” Ven. 578. An inf. following; a) with to: “I will p., Pompey, to increase your bondage,” Meas. III, 2, 78. “and so I p. you all to think yourselves,” Shr. II, 114. Tw. III, 4, 103. H5 I, 2, 9. IV, 4, 47. IV, 8, 68. V Chor. IV, 8, 68 H8 III, 1, 18 etc. b) without to: “your father --s you leave your books,” Shr. III, 1, 82. “in that I p. you use her well,” H6B II, 4, 81. “p. 'em take their pleasures,” H8 I, 4, 74. “to p. Achilles see us at our tent,” Troil. V, 9, 8. With an accus. and to: “and p. her to a fault for which I chid her,” Gent. I, 2, 52. “I p. you home to dinner with me,” Meas. II, 1, 292. With an accus. denoting the thing asked: “I know not how to p. your patience,” Ado V, 1, 280. H4B V, 5, 125. H4B V, 5, 125. “p. your mother's blessing,” Wint. V, 3, 120. All's I, 3, 260. “he humbly --s your speedy payment,” Tim. II, 2, 28. “--ed me oft forbearance,” Cymb. II, 5, 10.
2) to make petitions to heaven; absol.: “for his prey to p. he doth begin,” Lucr. 342. “on a love-book p. for my success,” Gent. I, 1, 19. “you must p.” Wiv. IV, 2, 162. “to p. against thy foes,” H6A I, 1, 43. Meas. I, 2, 16. IV, 3, 55. Err. I, 2, 51. IV, 2, 28. LLL I, 1, 304. Merch. I, 3, 39. V, 31. H4A II, 1, 87. H6A I, 1, 33 etc. With a clause (almost == to wish): “so will I p. that thou mayst have thy will,” Sonn. 143, 13. I p. she may (persuade) Meas. I, 2, 192. “he heartily --s some occasion may detain us longer,” Ado I, 1, 151. “I am not fair, and therefore I p. the gods make me honest,” As III, 3, 34; cf. R2 V, 3, 146. “let wives with child p. that their burthens may not fall this day,” John III, 1, 90. “I cannot p. that thou mayst win,” John III, 1, 90 John III, 1, 90 “and --s the Moor be safe,” Oth. II, 1, 33. Oth. II, 1, 33 “to p. they have their will,” Cymb. II, 5, 34. I omitted: “p. heartily he be at palace,” Wint. IV, 4, 731. “blest p. you be,” Cymb. V, 5, 370. With to: “the powers to whom I p.” Lucr. 349. “I think and p. to several subjects,” Meas. II, 4, 1. H4A II, 1, 88. John III, 1, 310. Tit. IV, 2, 48. Caes. I, 1, 59 etc. With an accus.: “I p. the gods she may,” Shr. IV, 4, 67. “God, I p. him,” R3 I, 3, 212. “I p. God, amen!” H8 II, 3, 56 etc. I omitted: “p. heaven he prove so,” Gent. II, 7, 79. “p. heaven she win him,” Meas. II, 2, 125. “p. heaven his wisdom be not tainted,” IV, 4, 4. As I, 2, 109. Oth. II, 1, 34. “p. God our cheer may answer my good will,” Err. III, 1, 19. R2 I, 4, 64 etc. The word prayer as object: “I'll p. a thousand prayers for thy death,” Meas. III, 1, 146.
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