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Prey, subst. 1) spoil, booty: “rich --s make true men thieves,” Ven. 724. “the p. of every vulgar thief,” Sonn. 48, 8. “reft the fishers of their p.” Err. I, 1, 116. “the French might have a good p. of us,” H5 IV, 4, 81. “the rascal people, thirsting after p.” H6B IV, 4, 51. Particularly that which carnivorous animals seize and feed on: Ven. 58. Ven. 58 Ven. 58 Ven. 58 Lucr. 421. Lucr. 421 Lucr. 421 Sonn. 74, 10. LLL IV, 1, 91. Merch. II, 1, 30. Tw. III, 1, 139. H6A I, 2, 28. H6B V, 2, 11. H6C I, 3, 14. R3 IV, 4, 386. Tit. III, 1, 55. Caes. V, 1, 87. Ant. III, 13, 167.
2) one, or something, given up to another; a victim: “for his p. to pray he doth begin,” Lucr. 342. “the tenderness of her nature became as a p. to her grief,” All's IV, 3, 61. “give her as a p. to law and shame,” H6B II, 1, 198. H6C I, 1, 185. II, 3, 39. R3 IV, 4, 106. Tit. IV, 2, 96.
3) the act of preying, of catching and devouring other creatures: “an o'ergrown lion that goes not out to p.” Meas. I, 3, 23. “methought a serpent eat my heart away, and you sat smiling at his cruel p.” Mids. II, 2, 150. “the eagle England being in p.” H5 I, 2, 169. “night's black agents to their --s do rouse,” Mcb. III, 2, 53. “dog in madness, lion in p.” Lr. III, 4, 97. “subtle as the fox for p.” Cymb. III, 3, 40. “to make p.” R3 I, 3, 71 (the later Qq may p.). III, 5, 84 (Ff make a p., Qq make his p.). Troil. I, 3, 123. “birds of p.” Meas. II, 1, 2. “creatures of p.” Wint. III, 3, 13. “beasts and birds of p.” Tit. V, 3, 198.
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