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Pride, 1) splendid show, beauty displayed, ornament: “began to clothe his wit in state and p.” Lucr. 1809. “in themselves their p. lies buried,” Sonn. 25, 7. “new unfolding his imprisoned p.” 52, 12. “why is my verse so barren of new p.?” 76, 1. “he of tall building and of goodly p.” 80, 12. the purple p. that on thy (the violet's) “soft cheek dwells,” 99, 3. “having such a scope to show her p.” 103, 2. “three winters cold have from the forests shook three summers' p.” 104, 4. “her hair, nor loose nor tied in formal plat, proclaimed in her a careless hand of p.” Compl. 30 (== a hand careless of ornament). “livery falseness in a p. of truth,” Compl. 30 “the madams did almost sweat to bear the p. upon them,” H8 I, 1, 25. “let two more summers wither in their p.” Rom. I, 2, 10. “'tis much p. for fair without the fair within to hide,” I, 3, 89 (it is a great ornament of external beauty, to enclose internal excellence).
2) state of being at the highest pitch: “while lust is in his p.” Lucr. 705. “in the very heat and p. of their contention,” H4A I, 1, 60. “a falcon towering in her p. of place,” Mcb. II, 4, 12. Hence == prime, glory: “thou loathed in their shame, they in thy p.” Lucr. 662. “in p. of all his growth a vengeful canker eat him up to death,” Sonn. 99, 12. “having thee, of all men's p. I boast,” 91, 12. “O short-lived p.! not fair?” LLL IV, 1, 15. “let's die in p.” H6A IV, 6, 57. “there died my Icarus, my blossom, in his p.” IV, 7, 16. “I cannot flatter thee in p.” H6B I, 3, 169 (cf. Oth. III, 3, 404). “thus Eleanor's p. dies in her youngest days,” H6B II, 3, 46. “mowed down in tops of all their p.” H6C V, 7, 4. “Richard falls in height of all his p.” R3 V, 3, 176. “my high-blown p. at length broke under me,” H8 III, 2, 361. “whose easy-borrowed p. dwells in the fickle grace of her he follows,” Lr. II, 4, 188. “p., pomp and circumstance of glorious war,” Oth. III, 3, 354.
== exuberance of animal spirits, mettle, fire: “the colt that's backed and burdened being young loseth his p. and never waxeth strong,” Ven. 420. their (the horses') “p. and mettle is asleep,” H4A IV, 3, 22. “as their captain, so their p. doth grow,” Lucr. 298. Lucr. 298 “the tide . . . . boundeth in his p.” Lucr. 298 “wert thou the unicorn, p. and wrath would confound thee,” Tim. IV, 3, 339. Hence == lust, eager sexual desire: “his hand, smoking with p.” Lucr. 438. “wooing his purity with her foul p.” Sonn. 144, 8. “proud of this p. he is contented thy poor drudge to be, to stand in thy affairs, fall by thy side,” 151, 10 (the words stand and fall cannot be understood too literally). “his heart, like an agate, with your print impressed, proud with his form, in his eye p. expressed,” LLL II, 237. “as salt as wolves in p.” Oth. III, 3, 404.
== wantonness, extravagance: leaves it (his gold) “to be mastered by his young, who in their p. do presently abuse it,” Lucr. 864. “now much beshrew my manners and my p., if Hermia meant to say Lysander lied,” Mids. II, 2, 54. “ambitions, covetings, change of --s, disdain,” Cymb. II, 5, 25 (== one excess changed for another). Hence == impertinence, impudence: “advance their p. against that power that bred it,” Ado III, 1, 10. “to abide thy kingly doom and sentence of his p.” R2 V, 6, 23. “such is thy audacious wickedness, thy lewd, pestiferous and dissentious pranks, as very infants prattle of thy p.” H6A III, 1, 16. “chastised with arms our enemies' p.” Tit. I, 33. “with strained p. to come between our sentence and our power,” Lr. I, 1, 172.
== force strained to the utmost, full power: “could entertain with half their forces the full p. of France,” H5 I, 2, 112. “hardly we escaped the p. of France,” H6A III, 2, 40. “and from the p. of Gallia rescued thee,” IV, 6, 15.
3) self-esteem, mostly in a bad sense, haughtiness, arrogance: Ven. 278. Err. IV, 3, 81. LLL II, 36. As I, 2, 264. II, 7, 70. III, 5, 114. All's I, 2, 37. R2 I, 3, 129. III, 2, 81. IV, 206. V, 5, 22. V, 5, 22 H4A I, 1, 92. III, 1, 185. H4B IV, 5, 171. H5 V Chor. H5 V Chor. H6B I, 1, 172. H6B I, 1, 172 H6B I, 1, 172 I, 3, 179. II, 2, 71. IV, 1, 60. H6C II, 2, 159. H8 I, 1, 68. II, 2, 82. II, 4, 110. Troil. I, 3, 316. Troil. I, 3, 316 Troil. I, 3, 316 II, 3, 95. II, 3, 95 II, 3, 95 II, 3, 95 II, 3, 95 II, 3, 95 III, 3, 45. III, 3, 45 III, 3, 45 IV, 5, 79. IV, 5, 79 Cor. II, 1, 22. Cor. II, 1, 22 Cor. II, 1, 22 II, 3, 227. III, 2, 126. IV, 6, 31. IV, 7, 37. V, 3, 170. Tit. IV, 3, 62. Tim. IV, 3, 240. Hml. I, 1, 83. Oth. I, 1, 12. II, 3, 98. Cymb. II, 4, 72. Per. I, 4, 30. to take p. == to be proud, to glory in sth.: “my gravity, wherein I take p.” Meas. II, 4, 10. “men of all sorts take a p. to gird at me,” H4B I, 2, 7. “took some p. to do myself this wrong,” Cor. V, 6, 37. == the thing of which men are proud: As III, 2, 81. H4A I, 1, 83.
4) cold selfishness, unkindness: “in thy p. so fair a hope is slain,” Ven. 762. “this p. of hers,” Gent. III, 1, 72. “stand I condemned for p. and scorn so much?” Ado III, 1, 108. Ado III, 1, 108 “maugre all thy p., nor wit nor reason can my passion hide,” Tw. III, 1, 163. “let p., which she calls plainness, marry her,” Lr. I, 1, 131. “fall and blast her p.” II, 4, 170. cf. also As III, 5, 114.
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