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Prince, subst. 1) a ruler of a state, a sovereign: Lucr. 615. Sonn. 25, 5. Tp. I, 2, 55. V, 108. Gent. III, 1, 10. Meas. I, 3, 45. V, 22. V, 22 V, 22 V, 22 V, 22 V, 22 V, 22 Err. I, 1, 145. V, 162 etc. etc. “the black p., alias the p. of darkness,” All's IV, 5, 44. “P. Lucifer,” John IV, 3, 122. “the p. of fiends,” H5 III, 3, 16. “p. of plackets,” LLL III, 186. “p. of cats,” Rom. II, 4, 19. “the p. of palfreys,” H5 III, 7, 29. “the p. of chivalry,” Troil. I, 2, 249.
2) a male member of a royal family: Tp. I, 1, 57. III, 1, 60. Wiv. III, 2, 74. Ado IV, 1, 154. Ado IV, 1, 154 Wint. I, 2, 164. Wint. I, 2, 164 II, 1, 17. III, 2, 41. III, 2, 41 IV, 2, 29 (the P. Florizel) etc. etc. “P. of Wales:” R2 II, 1, 172. H4A II, 4, 10. R3 I, 3, 199. the Black P. (eldest son of Edward III): R2 II, 3, 101. H5 I, 2, 105. H6B II, 2, 11. --s == lords: Ado V, 1, 277. John V, 7, 97. John V, 7, 97 H5 IV, 1, 25. H8 II, 2, 48.
Plur. --s including both sexes: “these two --s, if you marry them,” John II, 445. “young --s, close your hands,” John II, 445 Therefore we ought perhaps to read in Tp. I, 2, 173: made thee more profit than other --s can; O. Edd. princesse; most M. Edd. princesses against the metre. (Prince sometimes fem. with the contemporaries of Sh.; f. i. in Greene's Pandosto, ed. Collier, p. 15: alas, Bellaria, better thou hadst been born a beggar than a prince. p. 20: seeing she was a prince she ought to be tried by her peers).
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