previous next
Proper, 1) peculiar, belonging to a particular person or state: “thyself and thy belongings are not thine own so p. as to waste thyself upon thy virtues,” Meas. I, 1, 31; cf. “what better or --er can we call our own than the riches of our friends?” Tim. I, 2, 106. “it imports no reason that with such vehemency he should pursue faults p. to himself,” Meas. V, 110. “with great imagination p. to madmen,” H4B I, 3, 32. “which cannot in their huge and p. life be here presented,” H5 V Chor. H5 V Chor. “conceptions only p. to myself,” Caes. I, 2, 41. “it is as p. to our age to cast beyond ourselves in our opinions,” Hml. II, 1, 114.
2) (one's) own: “men hang and drown their p. selves,” Tp. III, 3, 60. “like rats that ravin drown their p. bane,” Meas. I, 2, 133. “the mere effusion of thy p. loins,” III, 1, 30. “in the witness of his p. ear to call him villain,” V, 310. “from his p. tongue,” V, 310 All's IV, 3, 29. Tw. V, 327. Wint. II, 3, 139. H4B V, 2, 109. Troil. II, 2, 89. Cor. I, 9, 57. Hml. V, 2, 66. Oth. I, 3, 69. Oth. I, 3, 69 Cymb. IV, 2, 97. Combined with own: “your own p. wisdom brings in the champion Honour on my part,” All's IV, 2, 49. “of the king of England's own p. cost,” H6B I, 1, 61. III, 1, 115. Caes. V, 3, 96.
3) conformable, adapted, suitable, becoming: “to cover with excuse that which appears in p. nakedness,” Ado IV, 1, 177. “that the comparison may stand more p.” Merch. III, 2, 46. “why not the swift foot of time? had not that been as p.?” As III, 2, 325. “if damned commotion so appeared, in his true, native and most p. shape,” H4B IV, 1, 37. “this noble isle doth want her p. limbs,” R3 III, 7, 125. “provide thee two p. palfreys, black as jet,” Tit. V, 2, 50. “p. deformity seems not in the fiend so horrid as in woman,” Lr. IV, 2, 60 (deformity conformable to the character). “'tis p. I obey him, but not now,” Oth. V, 2, 196.
4) honest, respectable (used of women): that is “an advertisement to a p. maid in Florence, to take heed . . . .,” All's IV, 3, 240. “what pagan may that be? A p. gentlewoman, and a kinswoman of my master's,” H4B II, 2, 169.
5) fine, nice, pretty (used of men): “as p. a man, as ever went on four legs,” Tp. II, 2, 63. “he's a p. man,” Gent. IV, 1, 10. Ado II, 3, 189. V, 1, 174. Mids. I, 2, 88. Merch. I, 2, 77. As I, 2, 129. III, 5, 51. III, 5, 51 III, 5, 51 Tw. III, 1, 144. John I, 250. H6A V, 3, 37. H6B IV, 2, 102. R3 I, 2, 255. Troil. I, 2, 209 “(a p. man of person).” Rom. II, 4, 217. Caes. I, 1, 28. Oth. I, 3, 398. IV, 3, 35. Ant. III, 3, 41. Cymb. III, 4, 64 (quite == handsome). “a p. squire,” Ado I, 3, 54. “a p. stripling,” Shr. I, 2, 144. “a p. fellow of my hands,” H4B II, 2, 72 (cf. Hand). “the issue being of it so p.” Lr. I, 1, 18.
Applied to things with irony: “a p. saying,” Ado IV, 1, 312. “a p. jest,” H6B I, 1, 132. “a p. title of a peace,” H8 I, 1, 98. “O p. stuff,” Mcb. III, 4, 60.
hide Dictionary Entry Lookup
Use this tool to search for dictionary entries in all lexica.
Search for in
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: