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Provide, 1) to procure beforehand, to prepare in careful foresight: “a small spare mast, such as seafaring men p. for storms,” Err. I, 1, 81. “to p. a salve for any sore that may betide,” H6C IV, 6, 87. “according to our law immediately --d in that case,” Mids. I, 1, 45; cf. “p. more piercing statutes daily,” Cor. I, 1, 86. “to hold what distance his wisdom can p.” Mcb. III, 6, 45. Used of a heavenly dispensation (cf. Providence): “'tis an accident that heaven --s,” Meas. IV, 3, 81. “he was --d to do us good,” Wint. IV, 4, 860. “the gods themselves have --d that I shall have much help from you,” Tim. I, 2, 92.
--d, or --d that, followed by the subjunctive, == on condition: Gent. IV, 1, 71. Merch. III, 2, 209. As II, 7, 45. Shr. I, 2, 217. Wint. I, 2, 335. R2 III, 3, 40. Hml. V, 2, 210. Cymb. I, 4, 166. Per. V, 1, 77. “two things --d more, that . . . he become a Christian,” Merch. IV, 1, 386.
2) to take care; absol.: “we must to horse again; go, go p.” All's V, 1, 38. “my cook and I'll p.” Tim. III, 4, 119. “we'll p.” Per. II, 1, 168. With an infinitive: you must p. to bottom it (her love) “on me,” Gent. III, 2, 53. “let us p. to see her coronation be performed,” H6B I, 1, 73. With for == to take care of, to do what is necessary for: “Fortune that did not better for my life p. than public means,” Sonn. 111, 3. “I have -- d for you,” Meas. II, 3, 17. “take this mercy to p. for better times to come,” V, 489. “his wonted followers shall all be very well --d for,” H4B V, 5, 105. “we will presently p. for them,” H6A V, 2, 15 (i. e. arm). “p. for thine own future safety,” H8 III, 2, 421. “he that's coming must be --d for,” Mcb. I, 5, 68.
Transitively; with an accus. of the person, == to furnish, to supply with what is necessary: “p. yourself,” As I, 3, 89. “I will p. thee,” H6C IV, 1, 60. “we will ourselves p.” Hml. III, 3, 7. Partic. --d: “I cannot be so soon --d,” Gent. I, 3, 72. it (danger) “will seek me in another place and find me worse --d,” H4B II, 3, 50. “with a sharp --d wit,” R3 III, 1, 132. “you shall know many dare accuse you boldly, more than, I fear, you are --d for,” H8 V, 3, 57. H6B I, 4, 3. R3 III, 4, 46. Tim. I, 2, 185. Lr. II, 4, 235. With of: “I am --d of a torch-bearer,” Merch. II, 4, 24. “you are as well --d of both,” H5 III, 7, 9.
With an accus. of the thing, == to procure, to prepare: “p. your block and your axe to-morrow,” Meas. IV, 2, 55. “hath he --d this music?” Ado I, 2, 2. Shr. II, 318. All's III, 4, 40. John V, 2, 98. R2 II, 2, 106. H6B III, 1, 276. Troil. III, 2, 220. Rom. III, 5, 180. Tim. I, 2, 198. V, 1, 35. Mcb. III, 5, 18. Oth. I, 3, 378. Ant. III, 4, 36 “(p. your going).” V, 2, 195. Dat. and accus.: “I'll p. you a chain,” Wiv. V, 1, 6. H4A I, 2, 214. H4B III, 2, 102. H6B III, 1, 319. Cymb. III, 2, 77.
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