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Purpose, subst. 1) that which a person intends to do, design, plan, project: “far from the p. of his coming hither, he makes excuses,” Lucr. 113. “this vile p. to prevent,” Lucr. 113 “one midnight fated to the p.” Tp. I, 2, 129. “the ministers for the p.” Tp. I, 2, 129 “forego the p.” III, 3, 12. “the sole drift of my p.” V, 29. Gent. II, 6, 42. Wiv. II, 2, 233. IV, 4, 77. IV, 6, 3. IV, 6, 3 V, 5, 214. Meas. I, 1, 74. I, 3, 4. IV, 5, 2. V, 314. LLL II, 109. V, 2, 122. Merch. I, 1, 133. III, 2, 230. As I, 1, 145. Tw. II, 3, 181. III, 4, 280. Wint. V, 1, 36. John II, 28. III, 1, 274. H4A I, 1, 28. II, 3, 7 “(undertake).” H4B II, 2, 195. IV, 2, 56. V, 2, 5. H6B III, 1, 256. R3 III, 1, 171. H8 I, 2, 209. III, 2, 168. Cor. III, 1, 148. Tim. V, 1, 17. Hml. III, 2, 23. Lr. II, 1, 113 (make your own p., how in my strength you please; cf. Make). Oth. I, 1, 12. I, 3, 39. Ant. I, 3, 67 “(bear).” II, 6, 126. IV, 3, 12 “('tis a brave army, and full of p.).” V, 2, 131 etc. “to have a p.” John V, 1, 76. H4B IV, 5, 210. Mcb. I, 6, 21. “to have p.” Wint. IV, 4, 152. Cor. IV, 5, 125. “to have the p.” Meas. III, 1, 163. “this their p. hither to this wood,” Mids. IV, 1, 166. “our holy p. to Jerusalem,” H4A I, 1, 102. “we recommend to you, tribunes of the people, our p. to them,” Cor. II, 2, 156. “my p. was for Tharsus,” Per. V, 1, 253. “by advised p.” R2 I, 3, 188. “for the selfsame p.” Lucr. 1047. “for the p.” Gent. III, 1, 152. Meas. II, 1, 155. LLL V, 1, 143. Merch. I, 3, 99. As IV, 2, 7. R3 V, 3, 274. Rom. II, 2, 130. Cymb. III, 4, 30. “that more for praise than p. meant to kill,” LLL IV, 1, 29 (a kind of zeugma, == more for praise than on purpose). of p. == with a design: “of p. to obscure my noble birth,” H6A V, 4, 22. “this is of p. laid by some that hate me to quench mine honour,” H8 V, 2, 14. “of p. to have him spend less,” Tim. III, 1, 26 (later Ff on p.). on p. == designedly, intentionally, expressly: “a swallowed bait on p. laid to make the taker mad,” Sonn. 129, 8. “belike his wife, acquainted with his fits, on p. shut the doors against his way,” Err IV, 3, 92. people sin upon p., because they would go thither (to hell) Ado II, 1, 267. “as hushed on p. to grace harmony,” II, 3, 41. “the lustful bed on p. trimmed up for Semiramis,” Shr. Ind. 2, 41. she sends him on “p. that I may appear stubborn to him,” Tw. III, 4, 74. H4B II, 4, 334. Lr. IV, 2, 94. Cymb. I, 6, 202. II, 3, 61 “(on angry p.).” Per. II, 2, 54 “(on set p.). to this p.” Sonn. 126, 7. Wiv. II, 2, 227. Meas. IV, 6, 4 (to vailful p.; some M. Edd. to veil full p.). Err. IV, 1, 97. R2 I, 3, 253. Cymb. IV, 1, 25 “(to a sore p.). with a p.” Troil. I, 3, 128. “with p.” Merch. I, 1, 91. John V, 7, 86. H6A I, 1, 133.
2) that which a person pursues and wishes to obtain, aim, object, and hence == bent of mind: “adding one thing to my p. nothing,” Sonn. 20, 12. “you are so strongly in my p. bred that all the world besides methinks are dead,” 112, 13. “if power change p.” Meas. I, 3, 54. “that the resolute acting of your blood could have attained the effect of your own p.” II, 1, 13. “but the next morn betimes, his p. surfeiting, he sends a warrant for my poor brother's head,” V, 102 (having satisfied his desire to excess). “am the tongue of these to sound the --s of all their hearts,” John IV, 2, 48. “it is the shameful work of Hubert's hand, the practice and the p. of the king,” IV, 3, 63. “this shall make our p. necessary and not envious,” Caes. II, 1, 178. “be a soldier to thy p.” Per. IV, 1, 8. “ask him his --s, why he appears upon this call o' the trumpet,” Lr. V, 3, 118.
3) that which a person demands; request, proposal: “in the morning early shall my uncle bring him our --s,” H4A IV, 3, 111. “your p. is both good and reasonable,” H6A V, 1, 36. “we'll execute your p. and put on a form of strangeness as we pass along,” Troil. III, 3, 50. “may I never to this good p. dream of impediment,” Ant. II, 2, 147. “therefore have we our written --s before us sent,” II, 6, 4. “our p. to them,” Cor. II, 2, 156.
4) that which a person or thing means to say or express, sense, meaning, purport: “I endowed thy --s with words,” Tp. I, 2, 357. “how you the p. cherish,” II, 1, 224. “my words express my p.” Meas. II, 4, 148. Meas. II, 4, 148 “if they do speak our language, 'tis our will that some plain man recount their --s,” LLL V, 2, 176. “the intent and p. of the law hath full relation to the penalty,” Merch. IV, 1, 247. “solicits her in the unlawful p.” All's III, 5, 73. “a passion hateful to my --s,” John III, 3, 47. “you start away and lend no ear unto my --s,” H4A I, 3, 217. “this challenge relates in p. only to Achilles,” Troil. I, 3, 323. “men may construe things after their fashion, clean from the p. of the things themselves.” Caes. I, 3, 35. “you bear a graver p., I hope,” Cymb. I, 4, 151. Lr. I, 4, 260. With to: “have you importuned her to such a p.?” Wiv. II, 2, 221 (== in such a sense; with respect to this). “the speech we had to such a p.” Meas. I, 2, 79. “I will think nothing to any p. that the world can say against it,” Ado V, 4, 107 (of any meaning, i. e. of any importance). “now I speak to some p.” As V, 2, 58. “thou never spokest to better p.” Wint. I, 2, 89. “he bade me take a trumpet and to this p. speak,” Troil. I, 3, 264. “they have pardons as free as words to little p.” Cor. III, 2, 89. “speakest with every tongue to every p.” Tim. IV, 3, 390.
5) something spoken of or to be done, matter, question, subject: “to listen our p.” Ado III, 1, 12 (Qq propose). “the extreme parts of time extremely forms all causes to the p. of his speed,” LLL V, 2, 751 (i. e. the haste and shortness of time, which is then the chief subject of consideration). “any such proverb so little kin to the p.” H5 III, 7, 72. “haste her to the p.” Troil. IV, 3, 5. “what have you dreamed of late of this war's p.?” Cymb. IV, 2, 345 (i. e. concerning this war). to the p. == a) come to the matter in question: Gent. IV, 1, 53. Meas. II, 1, 120. All's V, 3, 241. H4B V, 5, 122. Lr. II, 4, 184. Cymb. V, 5, 178. b) conformably to the subject or object in view, well, rightly: “he was wont to speak plain and to the p.” Ado II, 3, 20. Tw. I, 3, 21. Wint. I, 2, 100. Wint. I, 2, 100 Cor. II, 1, 95. Rom. II, 4, 46. Caes. III, 1, 146. Hml. II, 2, 287. V, 1, 44. to p., in the same sense: “nothing is done to p.” Cor. III, 1, 149.
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