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Part, subst. 1) a piece or quantity taken from the whole: her p. (of the mast) Err. I, 1, 108. “in what p. of her body stands Ireland?” III, 2, 118. “the third p. of a minute,” Mids. II, 2, 2. “if every ducat were in six --s, and every p. a ducat,” Merch. IV, 1, 86. Ado III, 1, 31. IV, 1, 136. LLL II, 136. Merch. I, 3, 152. IV, 1, 329. As III, 2, 157. IV, 1, 45. IV, 1, 45 R2 I, 1, 128. H5 I, 1, 51. H6A IV, 5, 39 etc. etc. “a p.:” Lucr. 1328. Sonn. 37, 12. Pilgr. 428. Rom. I, 2, 17. Ant. III, 2, 24. p., without the article: Lucr. Dedic. Ant. III, 2, 24 Tp. V, 302. LLL IV, 3, 15. Wint. II, 3, 3. IV, 2, 51. R2 IV, 194. H6A IV, 5, 38. H8 III, 1, 24. Lr. III, 3, 13. Oth. II, 3, 187. Ant. III, 6, 35. three --s == three quarters: “three --s of that receipt,” R2 I, 1, 126. “where being three --s melted away, the fourth would return,” Cor. II, 3, 35. “three --s of him is ours already,” Caes. I, 3, 154. “a thought which, quartered, hath but one p. wisdom and ever three --s coward,” Hml. IV, 4, 43. the half p. == half: “he is the h. part of a blessed man,” John II, 437. “most p.:” H6A II, 1, 67. Oth. II, 1, 24. “for the most p.:” As III, 2, 435. Wint. IV, 2, 5. Hml. III, 2, 13. the better p. either == that which is most valuable in sth.: “thou art all the better p. of me,” Sonn. 39, 2. 74, 8. “Atalanta's better p.” As III, 2, 155. “mine own self's better p.” Err. III, 2, 61. “the better p. of valour is discretion,” H4A V, 4, 121. or == the greatest number or quantity: “thy dear self's better p.” Err. II, 2, 125. “the better p. of my affections would be abroad,” Merch. I, 1, 16. “were I not the better p. made mercy,” As III, 1, 2. “the better p. of us,” H4A IV, 3, 27. “the better p. burnt out,” H4B I, 2, 178. “the best p. of an hour,” H4A I, 3, 100. great p. == a great deal, much; little p. == little: “Imogen, the great p. of my comfort,” Cymb. IV, 3, 5. “that I should purchase the day before for a little p. and undo a great deal of honour,” Tim. III, 2, 53. “no p.:” All's II, 1, 135. H6B IV, 1, 47. “some p.:” As I, 1, 82. Caes. I, 2, 28. in p. == partly: Compl. 144. H4B IV, 1, 99. Tit. I, 236. Tim. V, 2, 13. Hml. I, 1, 165. II, 1, 15. Lr. I, 2, 43. Cymb. II, 5, 28. “in some p.” Shr. III, 2, 109. p., alone, == partly: (mine eye) “doth p. his function and is partly blind,” Sonn. 113, 3. “and p. being prompted by your present trouble,” Tw. III, 4, 377. “this wretch hath p. confessed his villany,” Oth. V, 2, 296. “p. shame, p. spirit renewed,” Cymb. V, 3, 35.
2) any thing pertaining to and constituent in a whole: “when every p. a p. of woe doth bear,” Lucr. 1327. “all is semblative a woman's p.” Tw. I, 4, 34 (constituting a woman). “my lessons make no music in three --s,” Shr. III, 1, 60 (i. e. no trio). cf. if thou'lt bear “a p., thou shalt hear; 'tis in three --s,” Wint. IV, 4, 299. “it is music in --s,” Troil. III, 1, 20. Particularly used of the component organs and powers of man: when thou reviewest this (i. e. my poems), “thou dost review the very p. was consecrate to thee,” Sonn. 74, 6 (i. e. my mind). “although in me each p. will be forgotten,” 81, 4 (body and soul). “I do betray my nobler p. to my gross body's treason,” 151, 6. “dispossessing all my other --s of necessary fitness,” Meas. II, 4, 22. “I profane my lips on thy foot, my eyes on thy picture, and my heart on thy every p.” LLL IV, 1, 87. “what is infirm from your sound --s shall fly,” All's II, 1, 170. “these weeds to each p. of you do give a life,” Wint. IV, 4, 1. “my reasonable p. produces reason,” John III, 4, 54. “the outward --s,” V, 7, 15. “every p. about you blasted with antiquity,” H4B I, 2, 207. “the immortal p. needs a physician,” II, 2, 112; cf. Rom. V, 1, 19 and Oth. II, 3, 264. “course from the inwards to the --s extreme,” H4B IV, 3, 116. “he gave his blessed p. to heaven,” H8 IV, 2, 30. “the mutinous --s,” Cor. I, 1, 115. “this, being smelt, with that p. cheers each p.” Rom. II, 3, 25. “every p. about me quivers,” II, 4, 171. “each p. stiff and cold,” IV, 1, 102. “it hath cowed my better p. of man,” Mcb. V, 8, 18. “in the secret --s of fortune,” Hml. II, 2, 239. “none our --s so poor,” Ant. I, 3, 36. “make a battery through his deafened --s,” Per. V, 1, 47. cf. besides: Ven. 436. Ven. 436 Ven. 436 Sonn. 31, 3. 46, 13. 62, 2. LLL IV, 2, 28. LLL IV, 2, 28 Merch. III, 2, 82. As I, 2, 261. John III, 1, 291. Troil. I, 3, 200. II, 3, 184.
3) a portion assigned, a share: “who all their --s of me to thee did give,” Sonn. 31, 11. “the clear eye's moiety and the dear heart's p.” 46, 12. “and in his thoughts of love doth share a p.” 47, 8. “in all external grace you have some p.” 53, 13. “of his quick objects hath the mind no p.” 113, 7. “till each to razed oblivion yield his p. of thee,” 122, 7. “my p. of this sport,” Tw. II, 5, 195. “Sir Robert might have eat up his p. in me,” John I, 234. “the p. I had in Woodstock's blood,” R2 I, 2, 1. “our p. therein we banish with yourselves,” I, 3, 181. H4A I, 2, 58. III, 1, 75. III, 3, 87. R3 I, 3, 308. V, 3, 268. Cor. V, 3, 168. Rom. IV, 5, 67. Ant. III, 6, 26. Hence == lot, fate: “my p. of death, no one so true did share it,” Tw. II, 4, 58. To take in good p. == to receive or judge with kindness: take them (my cates) “in good p.” Err. III, 1, 28. “in the duke's lehalf I'll give my voice, which I presume, he'll take in gentle p.” R3 III, 4, 21.
4) that which is bestowed upon one, gift, endowment, quality; mostly in the plural: “thy outward --s,” Ven. 435. “shows not half your --s,” Sonn. 17, 4. “those --s of thee that the world's eye doth view,” 69, 1. when in his fair --s she (love) “did abide,” Compl. 83. “my --s had power to charm a sacred nun,” Compl. 83 “that I thy --s admire,” Pilgr. 66 and LLL IV, 2, 118. Wiv. I, 3, 67. II, 2, 110. Ado V, 2, 60. Ado V, 2, 60 LLL II, 44. Mids. III, 2, 153. Merch. I, 2, 46. II, 2, 191. As I, 1, 150. II, 2, 13. Shr. V, 2, 168. All's I, 2, 21. Tw. II, 4, 86. John I, 89. III, 4, 96. H4A III, 1, 188. H5 V, 2, 213. H8 II, 3, 27. II, 4, 139. Troil. III, 3, 117. Rom. III, 3, 2. III, 5, 183. Tim. II, 2, 23. III, 1, 40. Hml. IV, 7, 74. Lr. I, 4, 285. Oth. III, 3, 264. Seldomer in the sing.: “they will not admit any good p. to intermingle with them,” Ado V, 2, 64. “for fame's sake, for praise, an outward p.” LLL IV, 1, 32. “I'ld bid you mark her eye and tell me for what dull p. in't you chose her,” Wint. V, 1, 64. “your sum of --s did not together pluck such envy from him as did that one. What p. is that?” Hml. IV, 7, 77. “the continent of what p. a gentleman would see,” V, 2, 115.
5) share of action, particular business, task: “every p. a p. of woe doth bear,” Lucr. 1327. “confounds in singleness the --s that thou shouldst bear,” Sonn. 8, 8. “whether beauty, birth, or wealth, or wit, . . . entitled in their parts, do crowned sit,” Sonn. 37, 7 (M. Edd. in thy parts; cf. Entitled).* “one that can my p. in him advertise,” Meas. I, 1, 42. “the general, subject to a well-wished king, quit their own p. and in obsequious fondness crowd to his presence,” II, 4, 28. “and never could maintain his p.” Ado I, 1, 238. “that is your grace's p.” Ado I, 1, 238 “you may do the p. of an honest man in it,” II, 1, 172. “the extreme --s of time extremely forms all causes to the purpose of his speed,” LLL V, 2, 750. “which you use in abject and in slavish --s,” Merch. IV, 1, 92. “is this your speeding? nay, then, good night our p.” Shr. II, 303. “ours be your patience then, and yours our --s,” All's V, 3, 339. “by all the --s of man which honour does acknowledge,” Wint. I, 2, 400. “I have done the p. of a careful friend,” H4B II, 4, 348. “Lord Hastings had pronounced your p., I mean your voice,” R3 III, 4, 28. “it is our p. and promise to the Athenians to speak with Timon,” Tim. V, 1, 123. “it is the p. of men to fear and tremble,” Caes. I, 3, 54. “your highness' p. is to receive our duties,” Mcb. I, 4, 23. “that p. thou must act for me,” Cymb. III, 4, 26. “the gods have done their p. in you,” Per. IV, 2, 74. cf. besides: Lucr. 278. Lucr. 278 Lucr. 278 H8 I, 2, 195. Cor. IV, 3, 55.
Particularly == the character appropriated in a play, and what is like it: Sonn. 23, 2. Wiv. V, 4, 2. Meas. IV, 6, 3. Ado I, 1, 323. III, 1, 18. LLL V, 2, 150. LLL V, 2, 150 Mids. I, 2, 20. Mids. I, 2, 20 III, 1, 76. IV, 2, 38. V, 206. Shr. I, 1, 199. Tw. I, 5, 191. Cor. III, 2, 105 etc. “to play a p.:” Tp. I, 2, 107. Gent. IV, 4, 165. Gent. IV, 4, 165 Ado II, 1, 220. III, 2, 79. Wint. I, 2, 188 etc.
6) particular task done, characteristic action, merit or demerit: “this device . . . upon some stubborn and uncourteous --s we had conceived against him,” Tw. V, 369. “this p. of his conjoins with my disease,” H4B IV, 5, 64. “if not for any --s in him -- though his right arm might purchase his own time and be in debt to none -- yet, more to move you, take my deserts to his,” Tim. III, 5, 77. “it was a brute p. of him to kill so capital a calf,” Hml. III, 2, 110. “my --s, my title, and my perfect soul shall manifest me rightly,” Oth. I, 2, 31. “his honours and his valiant --s,” I, 3, 254.
7) side: “from all --s they are coming,” H8 V, 4, 72. Particularly in the sense of interest, party: “with either --'s agreement,” Shr. IV, 4, 50. “to stand on either p.” All's I, 2, 15. “holy seems the quarrel upon your grace's p.” III, 1, 5. “brings in the champion Honour on my p.” IV, 2, 50. “let confusion of one p. confirm the other's peace,” John II, 359. “upon which better p. our prayers come in,” III, 1, 293. “of the p. of England,” V, 6, 2. “on his p. I'll empty all these veins,” H4A I, 3, 133 (Ff in his behalf). “those that are misled upon your cousin's p.” V, 1, 105. “the numbers dead on both our --s,” H5 IV, 7, 123. “banding themselves in contrary --s,” H6A III, 1, 81. “the frozen bosoms of our p.” H6B V, 2, 35. uncurable discomfit reigns in the hearts of all our present --s, 87 (p.?). “my father came on the p. of York,” H6C II, 5, 66. “our Trojan p.” Troil. IV, 5, 156. “the p. that is at mercy,” Cor. I, 10, 7. “fought on p. and p.” Rom. I, 1, 121. “who parted either p.” Rom. I, 1, 121 though in “general p. we were opposed,” Tim. V, 2, 7. “I'll fight against the p. I come with,” Cymb. V, 1, 25 etc. to take p. == to embrace one's side or party: which (heart) “once corrupted takes the worser p.” Lucr. 294. “with my nobler reason 'gainst my fury do I take p.” Tp. V, 27. “take my p.” Meas. V, 435. Mids. III, 2, 322. Mids. III, 2, 322 As I, 2, 140. I, 3, 22. H4B V, 2, 96. H6A I, 1, 94. H6B I, 1, 240. IV, 2, 197. Rom. III, 3, 26. Lr. I, 4, 111 etc.
Hence the phrase for my p., for your p. == as for me, as far as concerns me etc.: Tp. III, 2, 15. Wiv. I, 1, 178. Ado V, 4, 110. Merch. III, 1, 29. III, 2, 229. V, 144. As I, 1, 7. All's III, 2, 46. H4B III, 2, 270. H6B I, 3, 104. R3 II, 4, 70. Caes. III, 1, 172 etc. “for mine own p.:” Wiv. III, 4, 65. Meas. II, 1, 219. Ado III, 5, 23. LLL V, 2, 502. LLL V, 2, 502 LLL V, 2, 502 Merch. II, 2, 109 etc. “for mine own poor p.” Hml. I, 5, 131.
On one's p. == a) on one's side, in or by one: (honour) “much deserved on his p.” Ado I, 1, 12. “that is too much presumption on thy p.” H6B V, 1, 38. “this interchange of love upon my p. shall be unviolable,” R3 II, 1, 27. “all his virtues, not virtuously on his own p. beheld,” Troil. II, 3, 127 (Ff of his own p.). “if on both --s this be not cherished,” Ant. III, 2, 32. b) in one's behalf: “to guard the lawful reasons on thy p.” Sonn. 49, 12. “upon thy p. I can set down a story,” 88, 6. “plead on her p. some cause to you unknown,” Err. III, 1, 91. “to speak on the p. of virginity,” All's I, 1, 148. “we do here pronounce upon the p. of the people,” Cor. III, 1, 210. Similarly in one's p.: “what in your own p. can you say to this?” Oth. I, 3, 74.
8) Plur. --s == quarters, regions, districts: “skilless in these --s,” Tw. III, 3, 9. “have in these --s from morn till even fought,” H5 III, 1, 20. “to be our regent in these --s of France,” H6A IV, 1, 163. H6B I, 1, 67. R3 IV, 2, 47. Cor. IV, 5, 148. Caes. III, 1, 264. Per. V, 1, 171. cf. Tw. III, 4, 294. H5 II, 4, 22.
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