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Part, vb. 1) trans. a) to divide into pieces or into shares: “let's p. the word,” LLL V, 2, 249. “like to a double cherry, seeming --ed, but yet an union in partition,” Mids. III, 2, 209. “I see these things with --ed eye, when every thing seems double,” IV, 1, 194. “the old proverb is very well --ed between my master Shylock and you,” Merch. II, 2, 158. “we'll p. the time between's,” Wint. I, 2, 18. “to tug and scamble and to p. by the teeth the unowed interest of state,” John IV, 3, 146. “raught at mountains, yet --ed but the shadow with his hand,” H6C I, 4, 69 (i. e. cut it in two by extending his hand). “p. in just proportion our small strength,” R3 V, 3, 26. “I had thought they had --ed so much honesty among 'em,” H8 V, 2, 28. “--s bread with him,” Tim. I, 2, 48. “p. the numbers,” Caes. III, 2, 4. “to p. the glories of this happy day,” V, 5, 81. “this coronet p. betwixt you,” Lr. I, 1, 141. “have my heart --ed betwixt two friends,” Ant. III, 6, 77.
b) to separate: “the ocean which --s the shore,” Sonn. 56, 10. “to p. a fray,” Ado V, 1, 114. “how canst thou p. sadness and melancholy?” LLL I, 2, 7. “thou --est a fair fray,” V, 2, 484. “when we have chid the hasty-footed time for --ing us,” Mids. III, 2, 201. “for --ing my fair Pyramus and me,” V, 191. “the wall that --ed their fathers,” V, 191 “the narrow seas that p. the French and English,” Merch. II, 8, 28. “severed lips, --ed with sugar breath,” III, 2, 119. “thus misery doth p. the flux of company,” As II, 1, 51. V, 2, 45. V, 4, 137. Shr. I, 2, 23. All's III, 6, 113. Wint. IV, 4, 354. John II, 389. V, 5, 18. R2 V, 1, 76. H4B I, 2, 257. H4B I, 2, 257. H6B IV, 7, 140. R3 II, 2, 150. Troil. III, 2, 55. Rom. I, 1, 76. Rom. I, 1, 76 Lr. V, 3, 22. Oth. II, 1, 93. Per. III, 2, 101.
c) to leave: “your souls must p. your bodies,” R2 III, 1, 3. “when we --ed Pentapolis,” Per. V, 3, 38. Sonn. 113, 3.*
2) intr. a) to divide, to go asunder: “the bushes, as fearful of him, p., through whom he rushes,” Ven. 630. who (the pillow) “therefore angry, seems to p. in sunder,” Lucr. 388. “if what --s can so remain,” Phoen. 48. “make thy knotted and combined locks to p. and each particular hair to stand on end,” Hml. I, 5, 18.
b) to be separated, to quit each other, to take farewell: “let us p.” Ven. 421. “summon us to p.” Ven. 421 “the honey fee of --ing,” Ven. 421 Gent. II, 2, 21. II, 3, 13. Err. V, 321. LLL V, 2, 57. LLL V, 2, 57 LLL V, 2, 57 Merch. II, 8, 36. Merch. II, 8, 36 As I, 3, 100. V, 4, 91. Shr. III, 2, 181. All's II, 1, 36. Wint. IV, 4, 155. John V, 4, 47. R2 I, 4, 5. II, 1, 222. V, 1, 70. H4B II, 1, 207. H6B III, 2, 355. H6B III, 2, 355 H6C IV, 3, 30. V, 5, 7. Rom. I, 1, 71. Caes. V, 1, 119. Caes. V, 1, 119 Ant. III, 2, 1 etc. Followed by “from:” Gent. IV, 4, 102. Wiv. II, 2, 274. Mids. III, 2, 80. Merch. III, 2, 174. Merch. III, 2, 174 As IV, 3, 99. R2 II, 2, 13. H4A V, 4, 71. Troil. IV, 4, 63. Lr. I, 4, 44. By “with:” Gent. II, 5, 11. III, 1, 253. Err. V, 221. Mids. II, 1, 137. As III, 2, 235. Shr. II, 64. Wint. V, 1, 160. R2 I, 4, 10. II, 2, 2. III, 2, 8. H4A I, 2, 187. III, 1, 194. H6C II, 6, 4. R3 I, 4, 251. Rom. III, 3, 174. Cymb. V, 5, 386 etc. Sometimes == to give away: “to p. so slightly with your wife's first gift,” Merch. V, 167. Merch. V, 167 “I will not p. with a village of it,” H5 V, 2, 183. “you will p. but with light gifts,” R3 III, 1, 118. “you cannot take from me any thing that I will more willingly p. withal,” Hml. II, 2, 220. With to: “therefore I p. with him, and p. with him to one that I would have him help to waste his borrowed purse,” Merch. II, 5, 49. “a greater sum than ever the clergy yet did to his predecessors p. withal,” H5 I, 1, 81.
c) to depart, to go away: “from whence at pleasure thou mayst come and p.” Sonn. 48, 12. “at my --ing sweetly did she smile,” Pilgr. 187. “but now he --ed hence,” Gent. I, 1, 71. “the company --s,” IV, 2, 81. “we shall p. with neither,” Err. III, 1, 67. “thus losers p.” Merch. II, 7, 77. “procured his leave for present --ing,” All's II, 5, 61. “an thou let p. so,” Tw. I, 3, 65. “we will not p. from hence,” V, 394. “pay then when you p.” Wint. I, 2, 10. “let them have pay and p.” H4B IV, 2, 70. “if the trial of the law o'ertake ye, you'll p. away disgraced,” H8 III, 1, 97. “so she --ed,” IV, 1, 92. “after we p. from Agamemnon's tent,” Troil. IV, 5, 285. “when I --ed hence,” Cor. V, 6, 73. “I would not p. a bachelor from the priest,” Tit. I, 488. “we must all p. into this sea of air,” Tim. IV, 2, 21. “France in choler --ed,” Lr. I, 2, 23. “what thing was that which --ed from you?” IV, 6, 68. “was not that Cassio --ed from my wife?” Oth. III, 3, 37. “Octavia weeps to p. from Rome,” Ant. III, 2, 4. “and --ed with prayers for the provider,” Cymb. III, 6, 52. Euphemism for to die: “a' --ed between twelve and one,” H5 II, 3, 12. “now in peace my soul shall p. to heaven,” R3 II, 1, 5. “thy --ing soul,” H6A II, 5, 115. “he --ed well,” Mcb. V, 8, 52.
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