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Retire, vb. 1) trans. to draw back, to lead back: each (lock), “by him enforced, --d his ward,” Lucr. 303. “that he might have --d his power,” R2 II, 2, 46.
2) refl. a) to withdraw from a public to a more private place: “and thence r. me to my Milan, where every third thought shall be my grave,” Tp. V, 310. “you must r. yourself into some covert,” Wint. IV, 4, 663. R2 IV, 96. Cor. I, 3, 30. Tim. II, 2, 171. Oth. II, 3, 386.
b) to retreat from battle: “the French fight coldly and r. themselves,” John V, 3, 13.
3) intr. (forming its perfect with to be) a) to withdraw from action, or from a public to a more private place: Tp. IV, 161. Wint. IV, 2, 36. H4B IV, 1, 13. H5 III, 3, 56. Cor. III, 1, 11. Rom. III, 1, 1. Tim. V, 1, 62. Mcb. II, 2, 66. Lr. I, 2, 183. Ant. IV, 4, 35. --d == withdrawn from society, living in private: Tp. I, 2, 91. Wint. IV, 4, 62. Cymb. III, 5, 36. cf. Wint. IV, 2, 36 and Tim. V, 1, 62.
b) to retreat from battle or danger: Lucr. 641. Lucr. 641 Wiv. III, 4, 86. John V, 4, 53. H5 III, 6, 99. H6A I, 1, 111. I, 5, 2. I, 5, 2 IV, 2, 21. H6B IV, 4, 39. IV, 9, 9. H6C I, 4, 14. II, 1, 188. II, 5, 8. Cor. I, 4, 28. I, 6, 50. Oth. V, 2, 271. Ant. IV, 7, 1. Ant. IV, 7, 1
c) to return: “this way she runs, and now she will no further, but back --s,” Ven. 906. “one poor --ing minute in an age would purchase thee a thousand friends,” Lucr. 962. “he'll say in Troy when he --s, the Grecian dames are sunburnt,” Troil. I, 3, 281. “whose icy current and compulsive course ne'er feels --ing ebb,” Oth. III, 3, 455. == to return, even in the sense of to answer(?): “with an accent tuned in selfsame key --s to chiding fortune,” Troil. I, 3, 54 (M. Edd. retorts, or returns).
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