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Run, vb. (impf. usually ran; sometimes “run:” Pilgr. 156; Shr. Ind. 2, 67; Mcb. II, 3, 117; in H4A II, 4, 287 Ff ran, Qq run. Partic. run; the perf. sometimes formed with to be, where to have would have been expected, as in H8 I, 2, 110 and Caes. V, 3, 25; cf. Be), 1) intr. a) to move by leaps or quick steps: Ven. 304. Ven. 304 Ven. 304 Ven. 304 Ven. 304 Sonn. 51, 14. 143, 1. Gent. III, 1, 188. Gent. III, 1, 188 Meas. III, 1, 13. Err. III, 2, 72. IV, 2, 30. Ado III, 1, 1. Mids. V, 271. Merch. II, 2, 9. As III, 2, 9. Shr. I, 1, 145. V, 2, 53. H4A II, 4, 287. III, 3, 43. H5 II, 4, 71. H6A I, 4, 19. Rom. II, 1, 5. III, 1, 142 etc. etc. “to r. away:” Pilgr. 156. Wiv. IV, 5, 67. Merch. II, 2, 6. V, 9. All's III, 2, 25. 42 etc. “he ran in here,” Wiv. I, 4, 38. Err. V, 257. “to r. on,” R2 V, 5, 59 etc. == to flee: Lucr. 742. Tp. III, 2, 21. John III, 4, 5. Troil. II, 1, 6. to r. away, in the same sense: All's III, 2, 42. H4A II, 4, 349. to r. from == to make haste to get away from: Err. III, 2, 98. Err. III, 2, 98 IV, 4, 152. Mids. II, 1, 227. Merch. II, 2, 2. == to flee from: “as from a bear a man would r. for life,” Err. III, 2, 159. “r. from the presence of the sun,” Mids. V, 390. “sheep r. from the wolf,” H6A I, 5, 30. Cor. I, 4, 35. II, 3, 59. Lr. IV, 6, 161. to r. before == to flee before: “thou --est before me,” Mids. III, 2, 423. Used as a term of huntsmen: “he ran upon the boar,” Ven. 1112. “when night-dogs r., all sorts of deer are chased,” Wiv. V, 5, 252. “a hound that --s counter,” Err. IV, 2, 39.
Metaphorical use: “lovers ever r. before the clock,” Merch. II, 6, 4 (are before their hour). “a woman's thought --s before her actions,” As IV, 1, 141. those (thoughts) “to God that r. before our business,” H5 I, 2, 303. “my desires r. not before mine honour,” Wint. IV, 4, 34. “I r. before my horse to market,” R3 I, 1, 160. “use and liberty, which have for long r. by the hideous law, as mice by lions,” Meas. I, 4, 63. “a woman would r. through fire and water for such a kind heart,” Wiv. III, 4, 107. “and r. through fire I will for thy sweet sake,” Mids. II, 2, 103. “time and the hour --s through the roughest day,” Mcb. I, 3, 147; cf. Cymb. V, 5, 128. “this tongue that --s so roundly in thy head,” R2 II, 1, 122; cf. LLL V, 2, 664. a --ing banquet == a hasty refreshment: “some of these should find a --ing banquet, ere they rested,” H8 I, 4, 12. “besides the --ing banquet of two beadles,” V, 4, 69 (cf. Banquet).
b) to flow, to move as a fluid: “in Simois' reedy banks the red blood ran,” Lucr. 1437. “a river --ing from a fount,” Compl. 283. “his tears r. down his beard,” Tp. V, 16. “the salt rheum that ran between France and it,” Err. III, 2, 131. “the course of true love never did r. smooth,” Mids. I, 1, 134. “all the wealth I had ran in my veins,” Merch. III, 2, 258. “the --ing brooks,” As II, 1, 16. Shr. Ind. 2, 52. “as fast as you pour affection in, it --s out,” As IV, 1, 215. “what relish is in this? how --s the stream?” Tw. IV, 1, 64. “shall the current of our right r. on?” John II, 335 (F1 rome). which (blood) “else --s tickling up and down the veins,” III, 3, 44. “calmly r. on to our ocean,” V, 4, 56. who (Severn) “ran fearfully among the trembling reeds,” H4A I, 3, 105. “the silver Trent shall r. in a new channel,” III, 1, 102. III, 1, 102 III, 1, 102 H4B IV, 1, 70. “the blood . . . --s in your veins,” H5 I, 2, 119. “smooth --s the water where the brook is deep,” H6B III, 1, 53. till it (the liquor) “r. o'er,” H8 I, 1, 144. “her eyes ran o'er,” Troil. I, 2, 157. Troil. I, 2, 157 “those boils did r.” II, 1, 5. “my mother's blood --s on the dexter cheek,” IV, 5, 128. “all the tears may r. into that sink,” Tit. III, 2, 19. “through all thy veins shall r. cold and drowsy humour,” Rom. IV, 1, 95. it (grief) “--s over at his eyes,” Caes. V, 5, 14. “from the which my current --s,” Oth. IV, 2, 59. “the fresh streams ran by her,” IV, 3, 45. “that tub both filled and --ing,” Cymb. I, 6, 49. “it would have r. all out,” II, 1, 10. Figuratively: “whose names r. smoothly in the even road of a blank verse,” Ado V, 2, 33.
Applied to the sand in an hour-glass: “I should not see the sandy hour-glass r.” Merch. I, 1, 25. “the --ing of one glass,” Wint. I, 2, 306. “the glass that now begins to r.” H6A IV, 2, 35. “our sands are almost r.” Per. V, 2, 1. Hence: “to see the minutes how they r.” H6C II, 5, 25.
c) Used of any kind of quick motion; == to ride: “to r. upon the sharp wind of the north,” Tp. I, 2, 254; cf. H4A II, 4, 377. H4B I, 1, 47. == to turn, to roll: “well run, dice!” LLL V, 2, 233. “thus the bowl should r.” Shr. IV, 5, 24. “the world, made to r. even,” John II, 576. “my fortune --s against the bias,” R2 III, 4, 5. “when a great wheel --s down a hill,” Lr. II, 4, 73. Figuratively: “much upon this riddle --s the wisdom of the world,” Meas. III, 2, 242 (== turns). == to rush, to fall: whilst I r. on it (the sword) Caes. V, 5, 28. Caes. V, 5, 28 Caes. V, 5, 28
d) Equivalent to to pass, to go: “lest the deceiving harmony should r. into the quiet closure of my breast,” Ven. 781. “ebbing men most often do so near the bottom r.” Tp. II, 1, 227. “makes him r. through all the sins,” Gent. V, 4, 112. “--s not this speech like iron through your blood?” Ado V, 1, 252; cf. “in this place ran Cassius' dagger through,” Caes. III, 2, 178 and V, 3, 42. I must rather give it (my tongue) “the rein, for it --s against Hector,” LLL V, 2, 664; cf. R2 II, 1, 122. “the prettiest lass that ever ran on the greensward,” Wint. IV, 4, 157. “even so must I r. on, and even so stop,” John V, 7, 67. “where he did r. reeking o'er the lives of men,” Cor. II, 2, 123. “where the flight so --s against all reason,” Mcb. IV, 2, 14. “our wills and fates do so contrary r.” Hml. III, 2, 221. “so --s the world away,” Hml. III, 2, 221 “let the time r. on to good or bad,” Cymb. V, 5, 128. to r. through == to go through, to pursue in thought: “I ran it through,” Oth. I, 3, 132. to r. over == to think over, to call to mind: “which you now were --ing o'er,” H8 III, 2, 139.
e) With into or to, == to come or get into a state: “r. into no further danger,” Tp. III, 2, 76. “such disgrace as he shall r. into,” As I, 1, 141. “the slightest folly that ever love did make thee r. into,” II, 4, 35. “lovers r. into strange capers,” II, 4, 35 “to r. into my lord's displeasure,” All's II, 5, 37. “have I r. into this danger,” IV, 3, 334. “the commonwealth hath daily r. to wreck,” H6B I, 3, 127. “would r. to these and these extremities,” Caes. II, 1, 31. In for into: “is r. in your displeasure,” H8 I, 2, 110.
to r. mad == to become mad: Lucr. 997. Ado I, 1, 88. Ado I, 1, 88 Tw. II, 5, 212. Wint. III, 2, 184. H4A III, 1, 145. H4A III, 1, 145 H8 II, 2, 130. Troil. V, 1, 54. Tit. IV, 1, 21. Rom. II, 4, 5. IV, 3, 48. IV, 5, 76. Oth. III, 3, 317.
f) to be reported, to be spread, to go: “volumes of report r. with these false and most contrarious quests upon thy doings,” Meas. IV, 1, 62. “there ran a rumour,” Mcb. IV, 3, 182.
g) to have a tenor or purport: “thus --s the bill,” H5 I, 1, 19. “so r. the conditions,” H8 I, 3, 24.
2) trans. a) to drive: “we r. ourselves aground,” Tp. I, 1, 4. “you r. this humour out of breath,” Er. IV, 1, 57. “beggars mounted r. their horse to death,” H6C I, 4, 127. “r. on the dashing rocks thy weary bark,” Rom. V, 3, 117.
b) to let flow, to emit: “the pissing-conduit r. nothing but claret wine,” H6B IV, 6, 4. “which . . . did r. pure blood,” Caes. II, 2, 78. III, 2, 193.
c) to strike, to pierce, to stab: “I'll r. him up to the hilts,” H5 II, 1, 68 (Bardolph's speech). “r. through the ear with a love-song,” Rom. II, 4, 14 (the surreptitious Q1 and most M. Edd. shot).
d) to bring to a state, to make, to get: “this tongue that --s so roundly in thy head, should r. thy head from thy irreverent shoulders,” R2 II, 1, 123.
e) to take, to pursue (a course), to perform: “this course which you are --ing here,” H8 II, 4, 217. “when he has r. his course and sleeps in blessings,” III, 2, 398. “when he doth r. his course,” Caes. I, 2, 4. you shall r. “a certain course,” Lr. I, 2, 88. “full merrily hath this brave manage, this career, been r.” LLL V, 2, 482. “r. a tilt at death,” H6A III, 2, 51. “thou ran'st a tilt in honour of my love,” H6B I, 3, 54. “r. the wild-goose chase,” Rom. II, 4, 75. “lads more like to r. the country base,” Cymb. V, 3, 19. “how brief the life of man --s his erring pilgrimage,” As III, 2, 138. “my life is r. his compass,” Caes. V, 3, 25. In the language of Nym, to r. humours == what he else calls “to pass humours:” Wiv. I, 1, 171. I, 3, 85. H5 II, 1, 127. Ven. 871.*
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