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Set, vb. (impf. and partic. set) I) trans. 1) to make to sit or stand (not lie): “sets you before my sight,” Sonn. 15, 10. “sets down her babe,” 143, 3. “I had rather be set quick i' the earth,” Wiv. III, 4, 90. “set me i' the stocks,” IV, 5, 123; All's IV, 3, 127; Lr. II, 4, 13; 65; Lr. II, 4, 13 “to set her before your eyes,” As V, 2, 73. “whoever shoots at him, I set him there,” All's III, 2, 115. have you not set mine honour at the stake (like a bear) Tw. III, 1, 129. “set on the head of a wasps' nest,” Wint. IV, 4, 813. “set against a brick-wall,” Wint. IV, 4, 813 “set before my face the Lord Aumerle,” R2 IV, 6. “set me lower,” H8 IV, 2, 76. “set me against Aufidius,” Cor. I, 6, 59. “to be set high in place,” II, 3, 255. “and set them upright at their dear friends' doors,” Tit. V, 1, 136. “set him breast-deep in earth,” V, 3, 179. “you will set cock a-hoop,” Rom. I, 5, 83 (cf. Cock-a-hoop). “set him before me,” Caes. I, 2, 20. “within my sword's length set him,” Mcb. IV, 3, 234. “I am set naked on your kingdom,” Hml. IV, 7, 44. “where may we set our horses?” Lr. II, 2, 4. “that their great stars throned and set high,” III, 1, 23. “set me where you stand,” IV, 6, 24. “thou hast set me on the rack,” Oth. III, 3, 335. “I'll set thee in a shower of gold,” Ant. II, 5, 45. “Antony shall set thee on triumphant chariots,” III, 1, 10. the piece of virtue (Octavia) “which is set betwixt us,” III, 2, 28. “set thee by Jove's side,” IV, 15, 36. To be set == to sit: “being set, I'll smother thee with kisses,” Ven. 18. “upon whose weeping margent she was set,” Compl. 39. “I would you were set,” Gent. II, 1, 91. “here I am set,” H4A II, 4, 482. “I was set at work among my maids,” H8 III, 1, 74. “set at upper end o' the table,” Cor. IV, 5, 204. Refl., == a) to sit down: “set thee down, sorrow,” LLL IV, 3, 4 (in I, 1, 317 sit thee down). “the king by this is set him down to sleep,” H6C IV, 3, 2 (viz in a chair. The watch's speech). b) to posture one's self: “in most strange postures we have seen him set himself,” H8 III, 2, 119.
Used of things, == to place in a standing, or any proper and natural posture: “set thy seal manual on my lips,” Ven. 516; Hml. III, 4, 61; cf. “in women's waxen hearts to set their forms,” Tw. II, 2, 31 (== to imprint). “against my heart he sets his sword,” Lucr. 1640. he sets his foot upon the light, 673; Shr. II, 404; Tw. II, 5, 205; R2 I, 1, 66; H4A III, 2, 95; H6C II, 2, 16; Tim. V, 4, 46; Caes. I, 3, 119; II, 1, 331 (set on your foot == go forward); Lr. III, 7, 68; Cymb. III, 3, 92. “to set footing:” R2 II, 2, 48. H6A III, 3, 64. H6B III, 2, 87. H8 III, 1, 183. Troil. II, 2, 155. “set her two courses off to sea again,” Tp. I, 1, 52. “set it down and rest you,” III, 1, 18; Wiv. III, 3, 6; IV, 2, 112; 120; As II, 7, 167; H4B II, 4, 11; R3 I, 2, 1; 33; 36; V, 3, 75; Per. III, 2, 51. “then may I set the world on wheels,” Gent. III, 1, 317. “love set on thy horns,” Wiv. V, 5, 4; Ado I, 1, 266; V, 1, 183. “shall I set in my staff?” Err. III, 1, 51. “such barren plants are set before us,” LLL IV, 2, 29. “on Hyems' crown a chaplet is set,” Mids. II, 1, 111. “set a glass of wine on the contrary casket,” Merch. I, 2, 104. “patches set upon a little breach,” John IV, 2, 32; cf. “set a new nap upon it,” H6B IV, 2, 7. “you that set the crown upon the head of this man,” H4A I, 3, 160; H6A IV, 1, 1; V, 3, 119; H6B I, 2, 40; I, 3, 66; H6C I, 1, 115; I, 4, 95; II, 2, 82; IV, 4, 27; Per. III Prol. 27. “the prince set a dish of apple-johns before him,” H4B II, 4, 5. “set me the crown upon my pillow here,” IV, 5, 5. “he wanted pikes to set before his archers,” H6A I, 1, 116. “set your knee against my foot,” III, 1, 169. “to set a head on headless Rome,” Tit. I, 186. “set me the stoups of wine upon that table,” Hml. V, 2, 278. “set it by,” Hml. V, 2, 278 “when such a spacious mirror's set before him,” Ant. V, 1, 34. With up: “as one would set up a top,” Cor. IV, 5, 161. “till I set you up a glass,” Hml. III, 4, 19 (i. e. a mirror). With on: “she's e'en setting on water to scald such chickens,” Tim. II, 2, 71 (placing water over a fire to heat it).*
2) to plant: “I'll not put the dibble in earth to set one slip of them,” Wint. IV, 4, 100. “in this place I'll set a bank of rue,” R2 III, 4, 105. “set hyssop and weed up thyme,” Oth. I, 3, 325. “she that --s seeds and roots of shame and iniquity,” Per. IV, 6, 92. cf. LLL IV, 2, 29.
3) to erect, to raise: “there is no sure foundation set on blood,” John IV, 2, 104. “we'll set thy statue in some holy place,” H6A III, 3, 14. “hath he set bounds betwixt their love and me?” R3 IV, 1, 21. “set up the bloody flag against all patience,” Cor. II, 1, 84; cf. setting it up (a scarecrow) “to fear the birds of prey,” Meas. II, 1, 2. to set up, especially used of persons or states raised to power: “to pluck a kingdom down and set another up,” H4B I, 3, 50. “can set the duke up in despite of me,” H6C I, 1, 158. “who set thee up and plucked thee down,” V, 1, 26. “set up Lancaster,” V, 1, 26 “may they not be my oracles as well and set me up in hope?” Mcb. III, 1, 10. Figuratively: “your cares set up do not pluck my cares down,” R2 IV, 195. “set up your fame for ever,” Per. III, 2, 97.
4) to place with a certain purpose, to fix, to arrange, to regulate: set spurs == clapped spurs to their horses, Wiv. IV, 5, 70. “thou art come to set mine eye,” John V, 7, 51 (to close it). to set the teeth == to press them close together: H5 III, 1, 15. Cor. I, 3, 70. Ant. III, 13, 181. set your countenance == look grave, Shr. IV, 4, 18. “to s. in order:” Wiv. V, 5, 81. H6A II, 2, 32. H6C I, 2, 70. Used of troops drawn up, and what is like them: on his bow-back he hath a battle set of bristly “pikes,” Ven. 619. “set we our squadrons on yond side o' the hill,” Ant. III, 9, 1. “the French are bravely in their battles set,” H5 IV, 3, 69. “that never set a squadron in the field,” Oth. I, 1, 22. “we will before the walls of Rome to-morrow set down our host,” Cor. V, 3, 2. “where we'll set forth in best appointment all our regiments,” John II, 295. “bid him set on his powers,” Caes. IV, 3, 308. “set our battles on,” V, 3, 108. Used of lime-twigs placed to catch birds: “lime-twigs set to catch my winged soul,” H6B III, 3, 16. “poor birds they are not set for,” Mcb. IV, 2, 36. Of gems placed on a ground of less worth: “feasts . . . in the long year set like stones of worth,” Sonn. 52, 6. “never so rich a gem was set in worse than gold,” Merch. II, 7, 55. “wherein so curiously he had set this counterfeit,” All's IV, 3, 39. “as foil wherein thou art to set the precious jewel of thy home-return,” R2 I, 3, 266. “this precious stone set in the silver sea,” II, 1, 46. “I will set you neither in gold nor silver,” H4B I, 2, 19 (Qq inset). “set this diamond safe in golden palaces,” H6A V, 3, 169. “a base foul stone, made precious by the foil of England's chair, where he is falsely set,” R3 V, 3, 251. (hence probably the signification of to set off sub 17). set with == studded with: Ado III, 4, 20. In music, == to compose, to tune, to fit to music: “set all hearts to what tune pleased his ear,” Tp. I, 2, 84. “give me a note: your ladyship can set,” Gent. I, 2, 81. In mechanics, == to regulate, to contrive: “their arms are set like clocks, still to strike on,” H6A I, 2, 42. In writing, == to copy fair: “we took him setting of boys' copies,” H6B IV, 2, 95. “which in a set hand fairly is engrossed,” R3 III, 6, 2. Partic. set, used of words, == well-placed, terse, elegant: “in good set terms,” As II, 7, 17. “the set phrase of peace,” Oth. I, 3, 82 (Ff soft).
5) to appoint, to station, to post: “thou set'st the wolf where he the lamb may get,” Lucr. 878. “crow so at these set kind of fools,” Tw. I, 5, 95 (appointed, customarily kept). “the heaven sets spies upon us,” Wint. V, 1, 203. “like heralds 'twixt two dreadful battles set,” John IV, 2, 78. “set to dress this garden,” R2 III, 4, 73. “an empty eagle were set to guard the chicken,” H6B III, 1, 248. “they are set here for examples,” H8 I, 3, 62. “stay not till the watch be set,” Rom. III, 3, 148. “set some watch over your son,” Hml. V, 1, 319. “my father hath set guard to take my brother,” Lr. II, 1, 18. “let's set the watch,” Oth. II, 3, 125. “set on thy wife to observe,” III, 3, 240.
6) to fix, to determine, to appoint: “now shall we know if Gadshill have set a match,” H4A I, 2, 119 (== made an appointment). “these whose ransom we have set,” H6B IV, 1, 139. “I'll set a bourn how far to be beloved,” Ant. I, 1, 16. “on set purpose,” Per. II, 2, 54. With down: “'tis set down so in heaven, but not in earth,” Meas. II, 4, 50. “you are set down for Pyramus,” Mids. I, 2, 22. “sets down the manner how,” Tw. III, 4, 79. “as I mine own course have set down,” Wint. I, 2, 340. “on Wednesday next we solemnly set down our coronation,” R2 IV, 319. “many limits of the charge set down,” H4A I, 1, 35. “ruminated, plotted and set down,” I, 3, 274. “we have not yet set down this day of triumph,” R3 III, 4, 44. “to set down her reckoning,” Troil. III, 3, 254. “keep your duties, as I have set them down,” Cor. I, 7, 2. “set down thine own ways,” IV, 5, 144. “I have in quick determination thus set it down,” Hml. III, 1, 177.
7) to stake at play: “who sets me else? by heaven, I'll throw at all,” R2 IV, 57.* “to set all at one cast,” H4A IV, 1, 46. “I have set my life upon a cast,” R3 V, 4, 9. “expectation --s all on hazard,” R3 V, 4, 9. “to set upon one battle all our liberties,” Caes. V, 1, 75. “I would set my life on any chance,” Mcb. III, 1, 113. “set less than thou throwest,” Lr. I, 4, 136. With up, in the phrase to set up one's rest == to take a firm resolution: Err. IV, 3, 27. Merch. II, 2, 110. All's II, 1, 138. Rom. IV, 5, 6.
8) to put in a condition, to make or cause to be; with a double accus.: the villanies of man will set him (the devil) “clear,” Tim. III, 3, 31. “I'll set thee free,” Tp. I, 2, 442. V, 252. Epil. V, 252 Shr. I, 1, 142. I, 2, 268. All's III, 4, 17. H6A III, 3, 72. H6C IV, 5, 13. IV, 6, 16. Tit. I, 274. Per. IV, 6, 107. “set ope thy everlasting gates,” H6B IV, 9, 13. “set it right,” Hml. I, 5, 189. With prepositions“: hast set thy mercy and thy honour at difference in thee,” Cor. V, 3, 200. “set mine eyes at flow,” Tim. II, 2, 172. “setting thee at liberty,” LLL III, 124. John III, 3, 9. “sets us all at odds,” Lr. I, 3, 5. “I have set my friends at peace,” R3 II, 1, 6 (Ff made). “set your heart at rest,” Mids. II, 1, 121. “set thee from durance,” LLL III, 129. sack sets it (learning) “in act and use,” H4B IV, 3, 126. “shall set them in present action,” Cor. IV, 3, 52. “setting endeavour in continual motion,” H5 I, 2, 185. “set my brother and the king in deadly hate,” R3 I, 1, 34. “set them into confounding odds,” Tim. IV, 3, 392. “let my unsounded self now set thy wit to school,” Lucr. 1820. “set the murderous Machiavel to school,” H6C III, 2, 193. “we'll set thee to school to an ant,” Lr. II, 4, 68. Oftenest with on: “a bell once set on ringing,” Lucr. 1494. “to set his sense on the attentive bent,” Troil. I, 3, 252. “to set on edge,” Wint. IV, 3, 7. H4A III, 1, 133. to set on fire (== to kindle, to inflame): Ven. 388. Wiv. V, 5, 39. John II, 351. H6B I, 4, 20. IV, 6, 16. Rom. III, 3, 133. Tim. III, 3, 34. “set me on the proof,” Tim. II, 2, 166. “to set the table on a roar,” Hml. V, 1, 210. On corrupted to a: “sets every joint a shaking,” Lucr. 452. “thou'lt set me a weeping,” H4B II, 4, 301. “set a work:” Lucr. 1496. H4B IV, 3, 124. Troil. V, 10, 38. Hml. II, 2, 510. Lr. III, 5, 8. omitted: “this man shall set me packing,” Hml. III, 4, 211.
Hence set on == intent on: “a patch set on learning,” LLL IV, 2, 32. “each heart being set on bloody courses,” H4B I, 1, 158. “my heart's on mischief set,” H6B V, 2, 84. And to set on == to make intent on, to determine to any thing with settled purpose: “set not thy sweet heart on proud array,” Lr. III, 4, 84. “to set my rest on her kind nursery,” Lr. I, 1, 125. cf. below: Rom. II, 3, 57. with up: “here will I set up my everlasting rest,” Rom. V, 3, 110.
9) to incite, to instigate: “for every trifle are they set upon me,” Tp. II, 2, 8. “one fruitful meal would set me to it,” Meas. IV, 3, 161. “have you not set Lysander to follow me,” Mids. III, 2, 222. “I set him every day to woo me,” As III, 2, 428. “envy and base opinion set against them,” H8 III, 1, 36. “sets Thersites to match us in comparisons with dirt,” Troil. I, 3, 192. “to set dogs on sheep,” Cor. II, 1, 273. “set the dogs o' the street to bay me,” Cymb. V, 5, 222. With up: “thou didst set up my disobedience 'gainst the king,” Cymb. III, 4, 90. Oftener with on: “some one hath set you on,” Meas. V, 112. Meas. V, 112 Meas. V, 112 Meas. V, 112 Meas. V, 112 “did my brother set thee on to this?” Ado V, 1, 254. Mids. III, 2, 231. Tw. V, 189. Wint. II, 3, 131. Wint. II, 3, 131 R2 I, 3, 131. H4B II, 1, 165. H5 II, 2, 42. H6A IV, 4, 8. H6A IV, 4, 8 R3 I, 2, 183. I, 4, 261. Cor. III, 1, 37. Mcb. II, 3, 36. Hml. III, 2, 45. Oth. II, 3, 390. V, 2, 329. Cymb. I, 5, 73.
10) to cause, to produce, to contrive; in a bad sense: “set dissension 'twixt the son and sire,” Ven. 1160. “twixt the green sea and the azured vault set roaring war,” Tp. V, 44. “myself and Toby set this device against Malvolio,” Tw. V, 368. “set armed discord 'twixt these perjured kings,” John III, 1, 111. “and set abroad new business for you all,” Tit. I, 192. “set deadly enmity between two friends,” V, 1, 131. With on: who set it on (the rout) Oth. II, 3, 210. “your reports have set the murder on,” V, 2, 187. to set abroach (cf. Abroach): H4B IV, 2, 14. R3 I, 3, 325. Rom. I, 1, 111.
11) to place in estimation, to value: “I have letters sent me that set him high in fame,” All's V, 3, 31 (but cf. Cor. II, 3, 255 and Lr. III, 1, 23 sub 1). “to set me light,” Sonn. 88, 1. R2 I, 3, 293. “thou mayst not coldly set our sovereign process,” Hml. IV, 3, 64. With at: “set the world at nought,” Gent. I, 1, 68. H4B V, 2, 85. Cor. III, 1, 270. “there shall no figure at such rate be set,” Rom. V, 3, 301. Hml. I, 3, 122. “I do not set my life at a pin's fee,” I, 4, 65. The construction inverted: “since of your lives you set so slight a valuation,” Cymb. IV, 4, 48. “set little by such toys,” Gent. I, 2, 82 (== make little account of). “you set nothing by a bloody coxcomb,” Tw. V, 194.
12) to direct, to cast, to fix (the eye): “with sad set eyes,” Lucr. 1662 (M. Edd. sad-set). “the setting of thine eye and cheek proclaim a matter from thee,” Tp. II, 1, 229. to set eye on == to see, to perceive: “King Cophetua set eye upon the beggar Zenelophon,” LLL IV, 1, 66. “no single soul can we set eye on,” Cymb. IV, 2, 131.
13) to oppose: “who would set his wit to so foolish a bird?” Mids. III, 1, 137. “and like a civil war set'st oath to oath, thy tongue against thy tongue,” John III, 1, 264. “sets the word itself against the word,” R2 V, 3, 122. V, 5, 13. “will you set your wit to a fool's?” Troil. II, 1, 94. “set limb to limb, and thou art far the lesser,” H6B IV, 10, 50. “I'll set those to you that can speak,” Hml. III, 4, 17. With up: “if knowledge could be set up against mortality,” All's I, 1, 35. “O madness of discourse that cause sets up with and against itself,” Troil. V, 2, 143. “they set me up, in policy, that mongrel cur Ajax against that dog Achilles,” V, 4, 13.
14) to write, to note down: that it (the day) “in golden letters should be set among the high tides in the calendar,” John III, 1, 85. “I'ld set my ten commandments in your face,” H6B I, 3, 145. “set quarrelling upon the head of valour,” Tim. III, 5, 27. “his faults observed, set in a note-book,” Caes. IV, 3, 98. Usually with “down:” Lucr. 1299. Sonn. 88, 6. Tp. V, 207. Gent. III, 1, 337. Ado III, 5, 68. Shr. III, 2, 63. All's I, 3, 234. III, 4, 33. IV, 3, 155. Tw. III, 2, 51. IV, 2, 118. Wint. III, 2, 140. IV, 4, 189. R2 V, 3, 54. V, 2, 98. H4B I, 2, 201. R3 III, 1, 86. Troil. IV, 5, 61 (cf. Write). Cor. III, 3, 10. Tit. V, 2, 14. Tim. IV, 3, 118 (cf. Troil. IV, 5, 61 and Write). Mcb. V, 1, 36. Hml. I, 5, 107. II, 2, 80. II, 2, 80 II, 2, 80 II, 2, 80 III, 2, 43. Lr. III, 7, 47. V, 3, 37. Oth. V, 2, 343. Oth. V, 2, 343 Cymb. I, 4, 178.
15) With to, == a) to apply to: “we set the axe to thy usurping root,” H6C II, 2, 165. “set his knife unto the root,” II, 6, 49. “he is set so only to himself,” Tim. V, 1, 120 (wrapt up in self-contemplation). b) to add to, to attach, to join with, to impart: “set smell to the violet,” Ven. 935. “I never saw that you did painting need and therefore to your fair no painting set,” Sonn. 83, 2. “I would set an oxhead to your lion's hide,” John II, 292. “set feathers to thy heels,” IV, 2, 174. “till I have set a glory to this hand,” IV, 3, 71. “if he do set the very wings of reason to his heels,” Troil. II, 2, 43. With the adverb to: “can honour set to a leg?” H4A V, 1, 133 (restore a leg cut off).
16) With the prepos. on, == to bestow on, to affect with, to impart: “his breath and beauty set gloss on the rose,” Ven. 935. “set this bateless edge on his keen appetite,” Lucr. 9. “on Helen's cheek all art of beauty set,” Sonn. 53, 7. “time doth transfix the flourish set on youth,” 60, 9. “set a mark so bloody on the business,” Tp. I, 2, 141. “your wrongs do set a scandal on my sex,” Mids. II, 1, 240. “set upon Aguecheek a notable report of valour,” Tw. III, 4, 209. “and on our actions set the name of right with holy breath,” John V, 2, 67. “to set a form upon that indigest,” V, 7, 26. “time hath set a blot upon my pride,” R2 III, 2, 81. “all their prayers and love were set on Hereford,” H4B IV, 1, 138. “to set a gloss upon his bold intent,” H6A IV, 1, 103; cf. Tim. I, 2, 16. “sin, death and hell have set their marks upon him,” R3 I, 3, 293. “what grief hath set the jaundice on your cheeks?” Troil. I, 3, 2. “set fire on barns and haystacks,” Tit. V, 1, 133 (never to set fire to). “my heart's dear love is set on the fair daughter of rich Capulet,” Rom. II, 3, 57. Rom. II, 3, 57 “set a fair fashion on our entertainment,” Tim. I, 2, 152. “set a double varnish on the fame the Frenchman gave you,” Hml. IV, 7, 133.
17) Equivalent to the verbs to place or to put: “fools that in the imagination set the goodly objects,” Compl. 136. “that I might set it in my prayers,” Tp. III, 1, 35. where should they (the eyes) “be set else?” III, 2, 11. III, 2, 11 “thou wert best set thy lower part where thy nose stands,” All's II, 3, 267. “thine eye begins to speak: set thy tongue there,” R2 V, 3, 125. “this present enterprise set off his head,” H4A V, 1, 88 (not charged to his account). “set bars before my tongue,” H6A II, 5, 49. set it (the head) “on York gates,” H6C I, 4, 179. Cymb. IV, 2, 99. Cymb. IV, 2, 99 “set this in your painted cloths,” Troil. V, 10, 46. “set honour in one eye,” Caes. I, 2, 86. “set a huge mountain 'tween my heart and tongue,” II, 4, 7. “and sets a blister there,” Hml. III, 4, 44. “sets ratsbane by his porridge,” Lr. III, 4, 55. “I'll set down the pegs that make this music,” Oth. II, 1, 202 (let down, lower). “that parting kiss which I had set betwixt two charming 'words,” Cymb. I, 3, 34. “I set it at your will,” IV, 3, 13.
With adverbs; to set apart == to cast off, to neglect: “all reverence set apart to him and his usurped authority,” John III, 1, 159. to set aside (cf. Aside): Wiv. II, 2, 109. Mids. IV, 1, 188. Shr. II, 270. R2 I, 1, 58. H4A III, 3, 137. H4A III, 3, 137 H4B I, 2, 93. H4B I, 2, 93 H6A III, 1, 93. H6C III, 3, 119. IV, 1, 24. Tim. III, 5, 14. to set by == to pass over, not to dwell on: “to set the needless process by,” Meas. V, 92. to set forth == a) to show: “set forth a deep repentance,” Mcb. I, 4, 6. b) to recommend, to praise: “to set forth that which is so singular,” Lucr. 32. “set thy person forth to sell,” Pilgr. 310. “I'll set you forth,” Merch. III, 5, 95. to set off == a) to remove: “every thing set off that might so much as think you enemies,” H4B IV, 1, 145 (cf. H4A V, 1, 88). b) to show to the best advantage: “their labour delight in them sets off,” Tp. III, 1, 2. “hath no foil to set it off,” H4A I, 2, 239. “to set me off,” H4B I, 2, 15. “he hath a kind of honour sets him off,” Cymb. I, 6, 170. “it is place which lessens and sets off,” III, 3, 13. to set out == to choose, to pick out: those enemies of Timon's and mine own whom you yourselves shall “set out for reproof fall and no more,” Tim. V, 4, 57. to set up == to placard: “he set up his bill here,” Ado I, 1, 39. “set this up with wax upon old Brutus' statue,” Caes. I, 3, 145. to set together == to join, to compound, to connect: Gent. I, 1, 122. H8 I, 1, 46.
II) intr. 1) to go down, to descend below the horizon: Lucr. 784. Lucr. 784 Lucr. 784 Tp. III, 1, 22. Err. I, 2, 7. Shr. Ind. 2, 122. John V, 5, 1. R2 II, 1, 12. II, 4, 21. R3 II, 3, 34. H8 III, 2, 225. H8 III, 2, 225 Troil. V, 8, 5. Rom. III, 5, 127. Tim. I, 2, 150. Caes. V, 3, 60. Caes. V, 3, 60 Caes. V, 3, 60 Applied to eyes: “thy eyes are almost set in thy head,” Tp. III, 2, 10 (extinguished, dimmed). “his eyes were set at eight in the morning,” Tw. V, 205.
2) to set about == to fall to, to begin: “shall we set about some revels?” Tw. I, 3, 145.
3) to fall on, to make an attack; followed by against: “you all are bent to set against me for your merriment,” Mids. III, 2, 146. By on: “we'll set upon them,” H4A I, 2, 194. II, 4, 193. II, 4, 193 II, 4, 193 V, 1, 119. H6A I, 1, 114. III, 2, 103. H6B III, 2, 241. H6C V, 1, 61. R3 V, 3, 348. Cor. V, 1, 58. With the adverb on: “Percy and set on!” H4A V, 2, 97. “let them set on at once,” Caes. V, 2, 3. “Cassio hath here been set on by Roderigo,” Oth. V, 1, 112.
4) to begin a march or journey or walk: “the king is set from London,” H5 II Chor. H5 II Chor. With forth: “it is meet I presently set forth,” Merch. IV, 1, 404. V, 271. Tw. III, 3, 13. R2 V, 1, 78. H4A I, 2, 187. H4A I, 2, 187 I, 3, 149. II, 3, 119. III, 1, 84. III, 2, 170. IV, 1, 91. H6A IV, 4, 11. Mcb. IV, 3, 135. Lr. IV, 5, 1. Lr. IV, 5, 1 With “forward:” John IV, 3, 19. H4A II, 3, 30. H4A II, 3, 30 III, 2, 173. With “on:” Meas. III, 1, 61. Wint. IV, 4, 682. John V, 3, 16. R2 III, 3, 208. H4B I, 3, 109. H5 V Chor. H5 V Chor. With out: “ready to set out for London,” H8 II, 2, 5. set forward and set on == go on: R2 I, 3, 109. R2 I, 3, 109 H4B IV, 1, 227. Cymb. V, 5, 479. H4B V, 5, 76. H8 II, 4, 241. Cor. III, 1, 58. Caes. I, 2, 11. Cymb. V, 5, 484.
5) With down, == to sit down, to pitch a camp, to begin a siege: “man, setting down before you, will undermine you,” All's I, 1, 129 (M. Edd. sitting). “if they set down before us,” Cor. I, 2, 28. I, 3, 110. Tim. V, 3, 9. Mcb. V, 4, 10. Ant. III, 13, 168 (M. Edd. sits).
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