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Shall (corrupted to 's: “thou's hear our counsel,” Rom. I, 3, 9. “ise try,” Lr. IV, 6, 246. cf. Cor. I, 1, 130. I shall etc. as monosyllables: Tw. IV, 1, 21. John III, 4, 78. H4A IV, 2, 83) 1) denoting an obligation or compulsion, under a necessity imposed by a particular will: “if thou wilt chide, thy lips shall never open,” Ven. 48 (i. e. as far as it lies in my power to prevent them). “thou shalt be my deer,” Ven. 48 “no dog shall rouse thee,” Ven. 48 which way shall she turn? what shall she say? 253 (== what would you have her say?). “thou shalt not rise,” Ven. 48 “within her bosom it shall dwell,” Ven. 48 Ven. 48 Ven. 48 “shall we give o'er and drown?” Tp. I, 1, 41 (== is it your wish that etc.). “what shall I do?” I, 2, 300. “seawater shalt thou drink, thy food shall be the fresh-brook muscles,” I, 2, 300 “hark what thou else shalt do me,” I, 2, 300 “shall I put him into the basket again?” Wiv. IV, 2, 48. Wiv. IV, 2, 48 Merch. II, 4, 40. H5 V, 2, 269. Caes. I, 3, 87 etc. etc.
The impf. should, as suggesting the idea of a previous determination, used of subjective as well as absolute obligation, == ought to: “beauty within itself should not be wasted,” Ven. 130. “what a horse should have,” Ven. 130 “upon the earth's increase why shouldst thou feed,” Ven. 130 “thy palfrey, as he should, welcomes the warm approach of sweet desire,” Ven. 130 “if I love thee, I thy death should fear,” Ven. 130 “what should I do?” Ven. 130 “love's golden arrow at him should have fled,” Ven. 130 Ven. 130 Ven. 130 “against this coming end you should prepare,” Sonn. 13, 3. “heaven did decree that in thy face sweet love should ever dwell,” 93, 10. 93, 10 “that he should extirpate me,” Tp. I, 2, 125. “you rub the sore when you should bring the plaster,” II, 1, 139. II, 1, 139 II, 1, 139 III, 2, 11. Gent. I, 1, 41. II, 6, 18 II, 1, 156. Wiv. IV, 2, 47. Meas. III, 2, 276. IV, 4, 11. Err. II, 1, 10. III, 1, 17. V, 57. Mids. I, 1, 47. II, 1, 242. All's V, 3, 27. Merch. II, 6, 44. H4B IV, 4, 109. Mcb. V, 5, 31. Ant. I, 4, 40. III, 3, 45 etc. etc. cf. what should I think? and what should I say? in Lucr. 1291. Meas. III, 1, 140. H6A I, 1, 15. Troil. II, 3, 186. Hml. II, 2, 286. Cymb. V, 5, 158.
2) denoting a futurity thought inevitable and answered for by the speaker: “a thousand honey secrets shalt thou know,” Ven. 16. “one sweet kiss shall pay this countless debt,” Ven. 16 “which thou unasked shalt have,” Ven. 16 “the kiss shall be thine own as well as mine,” Ven. 16 “thou shalt have it,” Ven. 16 Ven. 16 “sorrow on love hereafter shall attend,” Ven. 16 Ven. 16 Ven. 16 Ven. 16 Ven. 16 Ven. 16 Ven. 16 “this fair child of mine shall sum my count,” Sonn. 2, 11. “for this to-night thou shalt have cramps, side-stitches that shall pen thy breath up,” Tp. I, 2, 325. “it shall be done,” Tp. I, 2, 325 “beasts shall tremble at thy din,” Tp. I, 2, 325 “one word more shall make me chide thee,” Tp. I, 2, 325 II, 1, 233. II, 1, 233 II, 1, 233 II, 1, 233 II, 2, 77. Gent. I, 2, 115. II, 5, 40. Meas. II, 2, 14 etc. etc. In subordinate clauses: “they watch the door, that none shall issue out,” Wiv. IV, 2, 53 (those who are watching being supposed to say: none shall issue out). “to humour your cousin, that she shall fall in love with Benedick,” Ado II, 1, 396. “that thou shalt see the difference of our spirits, I pardon thee thy life,” Merch. IV, 1, 368. “that you shall surely find him, lead to the Sagittary the raised search,” Oth. I, 1, 158. Similarly should: “his art with nature's workmanship at strife, as if the dead the living should exceed,” Ven. 292. “this day my sister should the cloister enter,” Meas. I, 2, 182. “why should we proclaim it?” IV, 4, 9. “would make such fearful cries as any mortal body hearing it should straight fall mad,” Tit. II, 3, 104. “thou knewest too well my heart was to thy rudder tied, and thou shouldst tow me after,” Ant. III, 11, 58 etc.
Inevitability and indispensableness implied also in the following expressions: “it shall go hard but I'll prove it by another,” Gent. I, 1, 86. “he that escapes me without some broken limb shall acquit him well,” As I, 1, 134. “he that parts us shall bring a brand from heaven and fire us hence like foxes,” Lr. V, 3, 22 (else his labour will be lost). “then shalt thou see the dew-bedabbled wretch turn and return,” Ven. 703. “if they but hear perchance a trumpet sound, you shall perceive them make a mutual stand,” Merch. V, 77. “you shall mark many a duteous knave,” Oth. I, 1, 44. cf. “a proper man as one shall see in a summer's day,” Mids. I, 2, 89. “your grace shall understand that . . . I am very sick,” Merch. IV, 1, 150.
3) denoting futurity in general, the notion of certainty and inevitability being, perhaps, theoretically traceable, but hardly prevalent in the speaker's mind; not only in the first, but in the 2nd and 3d persons: “love's deep groans I never shall regard,” Ven. 377. “going I shall fall,” Ven. 377 Ven. 377 Sonn. 93, 1. Tp. II, 2, 45. John III, 4, 78. 87 etc. (I shall often used in replying to the orders of superiors: Meas. IV, 4, 21. All's V, 3, 27. H5 IV, 1, 28. H5 IV, 1, 28 IV, 3, 126. Ant. III, 12, 36. IV, 6, 4. V, 1, 3. 68). “more gentle-kind than of our human generation you shall find many,” Tp. III, 3, 33. “most welcome shall you be,” As II, 4, 87. “if much you note him, you shall offend him,” Mcb. III, 4, 57. “you shall find there a man who is the abstract of all faults,” Ant. I, 4, 8. “wink again, and I will wink; so shall the day seem night,” Ven. 122. “I'll sigh celestial breath, whose gentle wind shall cool the heat,” Ven. 122 “if thou survive my well-contented day, when that churl Death my bones with dust shall cover, and shalt by fortune once more re-survey these lines, compare them . . .,” Sonn. 32, 1. “this lord of weak remembrance, who shall be of as little memory when he is earthed,” Tp. II, 1, 233. “which I'll waste with such discourse as shall make it go quick away,” V, 301. “there shall he practise tilts and tournaments,” Gent. I, 3, 30. “they are fairies; he who speaks to them shall die,” Wiv. V, 5, 51. “men shall deal unadvisedly sometimes,” R3 IV, 4, 292 (quite == will, expressing frequent occurrence and what is to be expected). Gent. II, 7, 11. III, 2, 10. Meas. I, 1, 57. II, 1, 268. III, 1, 6. III, 1, 6 III, 1, 6 Err. III, 1, 123. Ado IV, 1, 226. Ado IV, 1, 226 Ado IV, 1, 226 Mids. I, 1, 10. II, 1, 268. Merch. II, 8, 26. Tw. III, 3, 44. John III, 4, 165. H5 II, 2, 2. IV, 3, 120. R3 V, 3, 201. Mcb. IV, 3, 47. Hml. III, 4, 166. Ant. II, 1, 1. Ant. II, 1, 1 IV, 8, 3. Cymb. IV, 3, 18 etc. Especially after when: “what excuse can my invention make, when thou shalt charge me with so black a deed?” Lucr. 226. “when forty winters shall besiege thy brow, thy youth's proud livery will be a tattered weed,” Sonn. 2, 1. “against that time when thou shalt strangely pass,” 49, 5. Gent. IV, 4, 1. Ado IV, 1, 225. John III, 4, 162. H5 III, 5, 58. H6A I, 6, 16. IV, 1, 113 (cf. R3 IV, 4, 292). R3 IV, 4, 292 H6B I, 1, 239. H6C IV, 7, 80. H8 I, 2, 115 (cf. H6A IV, 1, 113 and R3 IV, 4, 292). Cor. III, 1, 5. Mcb. IV, 3, 45. “when time shall serve:” Pilgr. 333. Ado V, 1, 264. Lr. V, 1, 48.
Should in subordinate clauses: “you have taken it wiselier than I meant you should,” Tp. II, 1, 22. “to bear up against what should ensue,” 1, 2, 1, 2 “with cat-like watch, when that the sleeping man should stir,” As IV, 3, 117. “told me Hubert should put out mine eyes,” John IV, 1, 69. “to whom he sung that your highness should deliver up your crown,” IV, 2, 152. “I looked a' should have sent me two and twenty yards of satin,” H4B I, 2, 49. “I thought I should have seen some Hercules,” H6A II, 3, 19. “she replied it should be better he became her guest,” Ant. II, 2, 226. “which, being took, should feed on life,” Cymb. V, 5, 51 etc. Once in a principal sentence, quite == would, in the sense of used: “pity was all the fault that was in me, for I should melt at an offender's tears,” H6B III, 1, 126 (cf. shall in Wiv. V, 5, 51. H6A IV, 1, 113. R3 IV, 4, 292. H8 I, 2, 115). Oftenest used to form the conditional tense, in all the three persons: Ven. 438. Sonn. 11, 7. 13, 5. 16, 9. 17, 9. Tp. I, 2, 118. LLL IV, 1, 50. IV, 3, 281. Merch. I, 2, 100. As I, 2, 240. All's I, 1, 23. Wint. I, 2, 57. John II, 427. IV, 1, 69. Troil. I, 3, 112. Troil. I, 3, 112 Troil. I, 3, 112 Troil. I, 3, 112 Cor. I, 3, 22. Hml. V, 1, 27. Ant. III, 1, 27. Cymb. III, 4, 153 etc.
4) denoting not so much futurity, as destination, == to be going to, to be to: “how shall that Claribel measure us back to Naples?” Tp. II, 1, 258. “what is he that shall buy his flock,” As II, 4, 88. “if then we shall shake off our slavish yoke, away with me,” R2 II, 2, 291. “this day my sister should the cloister enter,” Meas. I, 2, 182. “when the priest should ask, if Katharine should be his wife,” Shr. III, 2, 161. “his son, that should have married a shepherd's daughter,” Wint. IV, 4, 794. “all so soon as the all-cheering sun should in the forthest east begin to draw the shady curtains from Aurora's bed, away from light steals home my heavy son,” Rom. I, 1, 141. “they all strain courtesy who shall cope him first,” Ven. 888. “striving who should best become her grief,” Ven. 888 “would strive who first should dry his tears,” Ven. 888 “they throng who should buy first,” Wint. IV, 4, 612. cf. “who should find them but the empress' villain?” Tit. IV, 3, 73. Especially as who should say == as if to say: “anon he rears upright, as who should say 'Lo, thus my strength is tried',” Ven. 280. “the needle his finger pricks, as who should say 'This glove to wanton tricks is not inured',” Lucr. 320. “do a wilful stillness entertain, as who should say 'I am Sir Oracle',” Merch. I, 1, 93. “he doth nothing but frown, as who should say 'If you will not have, choose',” I, 2, 51. Shr. IV, 3, 13. R2 V, 4, 8. H6A I, 4, 93. IV, 7, 27. H6B IV, 7, 99. Troil. III, 3, 255. Tit. IV, 2, 121. Mcb. III, 6, 42.
5) In an interrogative sentence shall equivalent to let me, let us etc. in an imperative sentence: “shall we meet to-morrow? say, shall we, shall we?” Ven. 585 (== let us meet. German: wollen wir uns morgen wieder treffen?). “where shall we dine?” Rom. I, 1, 179 “(wo wollen wir essen?). shall I entreat a word?” Case. II, 1, 100 (== let me entreat). “shall we to the court?” Hml. II, 2, 271. “shall we see it?” Oth. III, 2, 5. cf. “do you consent we shall acquaint him with it,” Hml. I, 1, 172.
6) should used to express doubt, uncertainty, and even perplexity (as that which ought to be is often contrary to what is indeed): I should know that voice: it should be --, Tp. II, 2, 90 (== if I am not mistaken, I know that voice). “how say you? O, I should remember him,” Wiv. I, 4, 29. “so should a murderer look, so dead, so grim,” Mids. III, 2, 57 (German: so mag wol ein Mörder aussehen); cf. “so should he look that seems to speak things strange,” Mcb. I, 2, 46. “I should believe you,” All's III, 7, 12. “this Doll Tearsheet should be some road,” H4B II, 2, 182 (German: ist wol eine Strassendirne). “a man at least, for less I should not be,” H6C III, 1, 57 “(bin ich doch wol nicht). there should be one amongst 'em, by his person, more worthy this place than myself,” H8 I, 4, 78. “that should be the Duke of Suffolk?” IV, 1, 40. “if my sight fail not, you should be lord ambassador from the emperor,” IV, 2, 109. “I fear it is, and yet methinks it should not, for he hath still been tried a holy man,” Rom. IV, 3, 28 “(ist doch wol nicht). as I remember, this should be the house,” V, 1, 55. “this same should be the voice of Friar John,” V, 2, 2. “it should not be, by the persuasion of his new feasting. I should think so,” Tim. III, 6, 8. Tim. III, 6, 8 “you should be women,” Mcb. I, 3, 45. “there thou shouldst be,” V, 7, 20. “what it should be, I cannot dream of,” Hml. II, 2, 7. “thou shouldst be honest,” Oth. III, 3, 381. “by heaven, that should be my handkerchief,” IV, 1, 164. “may you suspect who they should be that have thus mangled you?” V, 1, 79. “it should appear, it should seem:” Merch. II, 2, 102. III, 2, 275. Wint. IV, 4, 372. Likewise in questions (followed by the inf. of the present even in speaking of things past): “where should this music be?” Tp. I, 2, 387. “where the devil should he learn our language?” II, 2, 69. “where should they find this liquor?” V, 279. “how should this grow?” Wint. I, 2, 431. “how or which way should they first break in?” H6A II, 1, 71. “why should you sigh?” H6C I, 1, 191. “where should I lose that handkerchief?” Oth. III, 4, 23. “how should she be murdered?” V, 2, 126. Tp. V, 119. Gent. IV, 4, 83. Gent. IV, 4, 83 Wiv. V, 5, 36. Ado III, 2, 42. As II, 7, 90. H4B I, 1, 55. IV, 4, 102. H8 III, 2, 203. Tit. IV, 1, 59. Rom. II, 4, 1. V, 3, 190. Tim. IV, 3, 399. Caes. I, 2, 142. Ant. IV, 3, 15. Cymb. IV, 2, 323.
7) should with the inf., periphrastically, for the simple verb in subordinate clauses: “may it be that thou shouldst think it heavy unto thee?” Ven. 156. “what am I that thou shouldst contemn me this?” Ven. 156 “it cannot be . . . thou shouldst strike at it,” Ven. 156 “it cannot be that John should entertain one quiet breath of rest,” John III, 4, 133. “say that the debt should double,” Ven. 521. “why should you think that I should woo in scorn?” Mids. III, 2, 122. “I would have sunk the sea within the earth or ere it should the good ship so have swallowed,” Tp. I, 2, 12. “I had rather crack my sinews than you should such dishonour undergo,” III, 1, 27. “'tis time I should inform thee farther,” I, 2, 23. “to know . . . why thou . . . should raise so great a power,” H6B V, 1, 21. “I have been content you should lay my countenance to pawn,” Wiv. II, 2, 5. “I am not glad that such a sore of time should seek a plaster by contemned revolt,” John V, 2, 13. “'tis not well that you and I should meet upon such terms,” H4A V, 1, 10. “it is no policy that he should come about your royal person,” H6B III, 1, 26. “that he should die is worthy policy,” H6B III, 1, 26 “a proper jest that Suffolk should demand a whole fifteenth,” I, 1, 133. “who is it like should lead his forces,” H4B I, 3, 81. “scorning it should pass,” Ven. 982. “this is my spite, that, thou being dead, the day should yet be light,” Ven. 982 “'tis not good that children should know any wickedness,” Wiv. II, 2, 134. “that I should be attached in Ephesus, 'twill sound harshly in her ears,” Err. IV, 4, 6. “what a scandal is it that two such noble peers should jar,” H6A III, 1, 70. “it ill befits thy state that thou shouldst stand,” H6C III, 3, 3. “which we disdain should tetter us,” Cor. III, 1, 79. “did sting his high-pitched thoughts that meaner men should vaunt that golden hap,” Lucr. 41. “'tis a passing shame that I should censure thus on lovely gentlemen,” Gent. I, 2, 19. “lest jealousy should disturb the feast,” Ven. 450. Ven. 450 Ven. 450 “for fear thou shouldst lose thy tongue,” Gent. II, 3, 52. “it mourns that painting should ravish doters,” LLL IV, 3, 260. “to grieve it should be,” Wint. II, 1, 77. “alack the heavy day when such a sacred king should hide his head,” R2 III, 3, 9. “alack, for woe, that any harm should stain so fair a show,” R2 III, 3, 9 “I melt with woe that winter should cut off our spring-time so,” H6C II, 3, 47. “'twill grieve your grace my sons should call you father,” III, 2, 100. “put not yourself into amazement how these things should be,” Meas. IV, 2, 220. “this I wonder at, that he should be in debt,” Err. IV, 2, 48. “wonder to what end their shallow shows should be presented to us,” LLL V, 2, 307. “didst thou hear without wondering how thy name should be hanged and carved upon these trees?” As III, 2, 182. “which is a wonder how his grace should glean it,” H5 I, 1, 53. “'tis strange that death should sing,” John V, 7, 20. “is it not strange that desire should outlive performance?” H4B II, 4, 283. “it seems to me most strange that men should fear,” Caes. II, 2, 35 etc. etc. Very often after if: “if it should thunder, I know not where to hide my head,” Tp. II, 2, 22. IV, 202. Gent. IV, 1, 14. Err. IV, 1, 78. Ado II, 3, 81. Merch. I, 2, 99. Shr. IV, 3, 13. John IV, 1, 68. Cymb. V, 1, 8. if omitted: “should she thus be stolen away from you, it would be much vexation to your age,” Gent. III, 1, 15. A principal sentence for one with if: “for a store of kingdoms you should wrangle, and I would call it fair play,” Tp. V, 174. “I should knock you first, and then I know after who comes by the worst,” Shr. I, 2, 13.
Elliptical expression by omission of the principal sentence: “that a brother should be so perfidious!” Tp. I, 2, 67. “that a monster should be such a natural!” III, 2, 37. “'mongst all foes that a friend should be the worst!” Gent. V, 4, 72. “O, that a lady, of one man refused, should of another therefore be abused!” Mids. II, 2, 134. H4B V, 4, 27. H6A I, 3, 58. H6A I, 3, 58 R3 II, 2, 27. Rom. I, 1, 176. Rom. I, 1, 176 Tim. IV, 3, 177. Cymb. II, 1, 58.
8) shall and should, directly joined with adverbs or prepositional expressions, == shall go, should go: “I shall no more to sea,” Tp. II, 2, 44. “thou shalt to prison,” LLL I, 2, 163. “thou shalt not from this grove,” Mids. II, 1, 146. “you shall hence upon your wedding-day,” Merch. III, 2, 313. “back you shall not to the lady,” Tw. III, 4, 271. II, 4, 125. H4B V, 1, 1. H6B I, 4, 54. V, 3, 27. H6C I, 2, 36. H6C I, 2, 36 H6C I, 2, 36 IV, 5, 20. IV, 6, 100. R3 I, 4, 157. III, 2, 91. H8 III, 2, 304. Tim. III, 6, 37. Caes. II, 2, 10. Hml. II, 2, 271. III, 3, 4. Ant. II, 3, 32. “if the bottom were as deep as hell, I should down,” Wiv. III, 5, 14. “if I had a thunderbolt in mine eye, I can tell who should down,” As I, 2, 227. “I should to Plashy too,” R2 II, 2, 120. “that we should on,” H4A IV, 1, 37.
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