previous next
Short, adj. 1) not long in space or extent: Ven. 297. Ven. 297 Wiv. II, 2, 18. Ado II, 1, 25. LLL III, 57. R2 II, 3, 17. V, 1, 91. V, 3, 117. H4B I, 2, 34. H6B I, 2, 12. H8 I, 3, 31. Lr. I, 5, 55. IV, 7, 40. Oth. II, 1, 284. Ant. II, 4, 7. Per. IV, 4, 1. Opposed to tall: Ado I, 1, 216. H4B V, 3, 36.
2) not long in time: Ven. 22. Ven. 22 Lucr. 791. Lucr. 791 Lucr. 791 Sonn. 18, 4. 125, 4. 146, 5. Meas. II, 4, 40. Err. V, 309. LLL I, 1, 181. V, 2, 798. Mids. I, 1, 144. Wint. I, 2, 169. R2 I, 4, 17. II, 1, 35. II, 1, 35 V, 1, 80. H4A I, 3, 301. III, 1, 91. V, 2, 82. H5 IV, 5, 23. R3 III, 1, 94. III, 4, 97. IV, 1, 79. IV, 1, 79. Cor. I, 7, 4. V, 4, 9. Rom. I, 1, 170. II, 6, 5. IV, 1, 1. V, 3, 229. Tim. III, 4, 11. Lr. IV, 7, 2. “in s. time,” H4A IV, 3, 90. Cymb. V, 5, 256. “in s. space,” H4A V, 1, 46. “s. breath,” H4A V, 2, 49. H4B I, 2, 206. “fetches her wind so s.” Troil. III, 2, 33. Troil. III, 2, 33 Used, for the sake of the rhyme, as a relative term of duration, == long: “a summer's day will seem an hour but s.” Ven. 23. Peculiar passage: “it must be shortly known to him from England what is the issue of the business there. It will be s.” Hml. V, 2, 73 (== shortly? or == a short time? cf. “three years is but s.” LLL I, 1, 181).
3) brief, not prolix, not tedious, not over-ceremonious: “this s. schedule,” Lucr. 1312. “s. answer,” Ado I, 1, 215. “s. letter,” LLL V, 2, 56. “we will make s. work,” Rom. II, 6, 35. “a s. farewell,” Cymb. III, 4, 188. “brief, s., quick, snap,” Wiv. IV, 5, 2. “to be s.” Shr. V, 2, 110. H8 IV, 1, 30. “s. tale to make,” H6C II, 1, 120. “a s. tale to make,” Hml. II, 2, 146 (cf. the quibbling in Rom. II, 4, 104). to be s. with == not to make much ceremony with: “I will be bitter with him and passing s.” As III, 5, 138. H8 V, 3, 52. Tit. I, 409. Substantively: the s. and the long (== the whole in few words), a phrase used by Mrs. Quickly and her equals: Wiv. II, 1, 137. II, 2, 60. Mids. IV, 2, 39. Merch. II, 2, 135.
4) deficient, inadequate: “praise too s. doth blot,” LLL IV, 3, 241. “we shall be s. in our provision,” Rom. IV, 2, 38. “his means most s.” Tim. I, 1, 96. “whose aim seems far too s. to hit me here,” Per. I, 2, 8. to come s. == to fail, to be insufficient: “how far a modern quill doth come too s.” Sonn. 83, 7. “who hath for four or five removes come s. to tender it herself,” All's V, 3, 131. “your reputation comes too s. for my daughter,” All's V, 3, 131 R2 I, 4, 47. Lr. I, 1, 74. II, 1, 90. Ant. II, 5, 8. with of: “her proportions came too s. of composition,” Meas. V, 220 (did not equal the composition). “he comes too s. of you,” Ado III, 5, 45. LLL V, 2, 748. H8 III, 2, 170. Troil. I, 3, 11. Hml. IV, 7, 91. Ant. I, 1, 58. Similarly: “striking too s. at Greeks,” Hml. II, 2, 491.
5) Adverbially, == so as to restrain or put a stop: “take up the English s.” H5 II, 4, 72. “should have kept s., restrained and out of haunt this mad young man,” Hml. IV, 1, 18. to cut s. == to make away with: “cutting s. that fraudful man,” H6B III, 1, 81. “bloody war shall cut them s.” IV, 4, 12. “cut s. all intermission,” Mcb. IV, 3, 232.
hide Dictionary Entry Lookup
Use this tool to search for dictionary entries in all lexica.
Search for in
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: