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Show (impf. showed, partic. showed or shown), 1) trans. a) to exhibit to view; absol.: “be not ashamed to s.” Hml. III, 2, 155. With objects: Tp. I, 2, 337. II, 2, 144. II, 2, 144 II, 2, 144 II, 2, 144 III, 2, 74. III, 2, 74 Gent. I, 2, 31. I, 3, 80. I, 3, 80 II, 3, 15. III, 2, 18. Meas. I, 2, 120. IV, 2, 160. LLL V, 2, 296. Mids. II, 1, 169. Merch. IV, 2, 11. As III, 5, 20. Wint. V, 3, 59. H6B III, 1, 15. Cor. II, 3, 171. III, 2, 22. Rom. I, 2, 103. Hml. III, 2, 154. Ant. II, 5, 8. V, 2, 227. Cymb. V, 5, 432 etc. etc. With to before the dative: Troil. III, 3, 79. Ant. IV, 14, 112. V, 1, 38. The dative subject of the passive: “no such sight to be --n,” Rom. I, 2, 105 (== to see). With a refl. pronoun: Tp. III, 2, 137. Wiv. II, 1, 22. Ado III, 2, 133. Shr. II, 51. All's II, 5, 73. H4A II, 4, 105. Cor. I, 2, 21. Tim. III, 2, 51 etc. With off: “I like your silence, it the more --s off your wonder,” Wint. V, 3, 21. With out: “I must s. out a flag and sign of love,” Oth. I, 1, 157.
b) to let be seen, not to conceal, to betray: “this visitation --s it,” Tp. III, 1, 32. “the more it seeks to hide itself, the bigger bulk it --s,” III, 1, 81. “see it so grossly --n in thy behaviours,” All's I, 3, 184. “to one of your receiving enough is --n,” Tw. III, 1, 132. “I have --ed too much the rashness of a woman,” Wint. III, 2, 221. “s. me an iron heart,” Tim. III, 4, 84. “to s. one's head:” Sonn. 26, 14. Merch. III, 1, 47. R2 V, 6, 44. Troil. V, 6, 1. “to s. one's face:” Troil. V, 5, 45. Mcb. V, 7, 14. “to s. thy dangerous brow,” Caes. II, 1, 78.
c) to discover, to reveal, to communicate, to teach: “I'll s. my mind,” Gent. I, 2, 7 (== tell my opinion). “s. no colour for my extremity,” Wiv. IV, 2, 168. “he --s his reason for that,” Meas. IV, 4, 13. “where we'll s. what's yet behind,” V, 544. “s. me briefly how,” Ado II, 2, 11. “all the secrets of our camp I'll s.” All's IV, 1, 93 (a strange passage in All's II, 3, 25--27). “I will s. thee no reason,” Tw. III, 4, 166. “where you do remain let paper s.” R2 I, 3, 250. “s. some reason why Somerset should be preferred,” H6B I, 3, 116. H6B I, 3, 116 “I'll s. thee wondrous things,” Tit. V, 1, 55. “I'll s. you how to observe a strange event,” Tim. III, 4, 17. “to you they have --ed some truth,” Mcb. II, 1, 21. “with an entreaty, herein further --n,” Hml. II, 2, 76. “this hath my daughter --n me,” Hml. II, 2, 76 “let his queen mother all alone entreat him to s. his grief,” III, 1, 191. “s. me thy thought,” Oth. III, 3, 116.
d) to prove: “his eye --s his hot courage,” Ven. 276. “by their rank thoughts my deeds must not be --n,” Sonn. 121, 12. “that the contents will s.” Gent. I, 2, 36. “I have to s. to the contrary,” Wiv. II, 1, 38. Wiv. II, 1, 38 “the country proverb known in your waking shall be --n,” Mids. III, 2, 460. “--ing we would not spare heaven,” Meas. II, 3, 33. “hast --ed thou makest some tender of my life,” H4A V, 4, 49. “there was very little honour --ed in this,” Tim. III, 2, 21. “s. us to be watchers,” Mcb. II, 2, 71. “when I have --ed the unfitness,” Lr. I, 4, 356 etc. With a double accus.: “--s thee unripe,” Ven. 128. “Silvia --s Julia but a swarthy Ethiope,” Gent. II, 6, 26. I, 2, 29. Wiv. II, 3, 56. Wiv. II, 3, 56 Shr. V, 1, 76 etc.
e) to offer, to commit, to do, to bestow: “s. some pity,” Meas. II, 2, 99. “s. justice,” Meas. II, 2, 99 “you have --ed me that which well approves you're great in fortune,” All's III, 7, 13. “the fair kindness you have --ed me here,” Tw. III, 4, 376. “that souls refined should s. so heinous a deed,” R2 IV, 131. “you s. great mercy,” H5 II, 2, 50. IV, 4, 68. H8 I, 1, 223. Cor. I, 3, 5. V, 3, 55. V, 3, 55 V, 3, 55 Tit. II, 3, 147. Tim. IV, 3, 534. Hml. I, 2, 40. Hml. I, 2, 40 Lr. II, 1, 107. Cymb. V, 4, 30 etc.
f) to point out the way to, to guide: “will you s. me to this house?” Merch. IV, 2, 19.
2) intr. a) to appear, to become visible: “fire in a flint, which will not s. without knocking,” Troil. III, 3, 258. “the fire i' the flint --s not till it be struck,” Tim. I, 1, 23. “s., s., s.!” Mcb. IV, 1, 107. With a dative without to: “s. his eyes, and grieve his heart,” Mcb. IV, 1, 110.
b) to appear, to look, to have appearance, to be in appearance (joined with substantives, or adjectives, or adverbs): “this beauteous combat --ed like two silver doves,” Ven. 366. “perverse it shall be where it --s most toward,” Ven. 366 my duty would s. greater, Lucr. Ded. Ven. 366 “what is vile --s like a virtuous deed,” Lucr. 252. “whose perfect white --ed like an April daisy,” Lucr. 252 “in whom all ill well --s,” Sonn. 40, 13. “the one doth shadow of your beauty s.” 53, 10. “to make him seem long hence as he --s now,” 101, 14. 105, 2. Compl. 96. Gent. II, 7, 48. Meas. IV, 4, 4. Err. III, 2, 31. Ado I, 2, 8. Merch. II, 2, 193. IV, 1, 196. As I, 3, 83. All's III, 5, 24. Wint. IV, 4, 636. John III, 4, 115. R2 II, 2, 15. H4A I, 2, 238. I, 3, 35. III, 2, 58. V, 2, 51. H4B II, 2, 7. IV, 1, 63. IV, 2, 4. IV, 3, 55. IV, 3, 55 H5 II, 2, 127. H6B V, 1, 205. H8 I, 1, 22. Troil. I, 3, 84. Cor. III, 3, 50. IV, 5, 68. IV, 6, 114. V, 3, 13. Rom. I, 2, 104. I, 5, 50. I, 5, 50 Tim. III, 4, 21. V, 1, 15. Mcb. I, 3, 54. V, 6, 2. Hml. II, 2, 391. V, 2, 113 (of very soft society and great --ing; == distinguished appearance; Osrick's euphuism). Lr. I, 4, 265. Lr. I, 4, 265 IV, 6, 14. Oth. V, 2, 203. Ant. II, 2, 147. III, 3, 23. IV, 8, 7. Per. IV, 1, 89. Perhaps followed by an inf., at least one understood: “they that have power to hurt, and will do none, that do not do the thing they most do s.” Sonn. 94, 2 (== they most s. to do? But it may be explained otherwise).
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