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Side, subst. 1) the part of an animal body fortified by the ribs, between the back and the belly: “his brawny --s, with hairy bristles armed,” Ven. 625. “plucked the knife from Lucrece' s.” Lucr. 1807. “more sharp to me than spurring to his s.” Sonn. 50, 12. “backs, shoulders, --s,” Wiv. V, 5, 58. As III, 4, 47. H4B I, 1, 45. H6A V, 3, 49. Mcb. I, 7, 26. “and by my s. wear steel,” Wiv. I, 3, 84. Ado V, 1, 126. Tit. II, 1, 39. Hml. V, 2, 166. Cymb. I, 4, 6. “draw this metal from my s.” John V, 2, 16. “spectacles on nose and pouch on s.” As II, 7, 159.
Used to denote immediate nearness and proximity: “whose messengers are here about my s.” Oth. I, 2, 89. “tempteth my better angel from my s.” Sonn. 144, 6. Mids. III, 2, 185. R2 III, 2, 80. H6A IV, 5, 48. IV, 7, 12. H6B III, 1, 191. Tim. IV, 3, 31. Oth. V, 2, 208. “oft came Edward to my s.” H6C I, 4, 11. Oftenest preceded by by: “by Venus' s.” Ven. 180. “the boy that by her s. lay killed,” Ven. 180 “by Lucrece' s.” Lucr. 381. Lucr. 381 Sonn. 151, 12. 154, 2. Compl. 65. Mids. II, 1, 125. II, 2, 51. III, 2, 39. Merch. III, 2, 307. All's II, 3, 53. Shr. Ind. 2, 146. Tw. V, 80. R2 I, 3, 252. H5 IV, 6, 8. H6A IV, 6, 56. H6C III, 3, 16. Tit. V, 1, 48. V, 2, 45. Caes. III, 1, 271. Lr. III, 6, 40. Oth. IV, 1, 195. V, 2, 237. Ant. II, 3, 18. IV, 15, 36. Cymb. V, 5, 1. “s. by s.” H6A IV, 5, 54. Preceded by on: “she, on his left s., craving aid,” H6C III, 1, 43. “on his right,” H6C III, 1, 43 “went on each s. of the queen,” H8 IV, 1, 100. Of omitted after it: “on each s. her stood pretty boys,” Ant. II, 2, 206.
2) Plur. --s == frame of the body; in a proper and metaphorical sense: “this broken music in his --s,” As I, 2, 150. “let nature crush the --s o' the earth together,” Wint. IV, 4, 489. “breaks the --s of loyalty,” H8 I, 2, 28. “whose quality the --s o' the world may danger,” Ant. I, 2, 199. “Caesar's ambition which swelled so much that it did almost stretch the --s o' the world,” Cymb. III, 1, 51. Especially == the breast, as containing the heart or the lungs: “both on one sampler, . . . both warbling of one song, as if our hands, our --s, voices and minds, had been incorporate,” Mids. III, 2, 207. “Taurus, that's --s and heart,” Tw. I, 3, 148. “there's no woman's --s can bide the beating of so strong a passion,” II, 4, 96. “he cracks his gorge, his --s, with violent hefts,” Wint. II, 1, 44. “hacked one another in the --s of Caesar,” Caes. V, 1, 40. “O --s, you are too tough,” Lr. II, 4, 200. “the --s of nature will not sustain it,” Ant. I, 3, 16. “as loud as his strong --s can volley,” II, 7, 118. “cleave, my --s,” IV, 14, 39. “can my --s hold,” Cymb. I, 6, 69. Considered as the part principally fed by nourishment: “it is the pasture lards the brother's --s,” Tim. IV, 3, 12. “your houseless heads and unfed --s,” Lr. III, 4, 30. As the seat of carnal desire: “I will keep my --s to myself,” Wiv. V, 5, 28. “with Tarquin's ravishing --s,” Mcb. II, 1, 55 (most M. Edd. strides).
3) Applied, after the analogy of the animal body, to other things having two principal parts or surfaces opposed to each other: (the pillow) swelling on either s. (of the hand) “to want his bliss,” Lucr. 389. “angel on the outward s.” Meas. III, 2, 286. “on the windy s. of care,” Ado II, 1, 327; cf. “still you keep o' the windy s. of the law,” Tw. III, 4, 181. “my vessel's s.” Merch. I, 1, 32. “damned like an ill-roasted egg, all on one s.” As III, 2, 39. “our cake is dough on both --s,” Shr. I, 1, 110. “her head on one s.” Wint. III, 3, 20; cf. “hang my head at one s.” Oth. IV, 3, 32. “on this s. my hand, and on that s. yours,” R2 IV, 183. V, 2, 18. H4A III, 1, 109. H4A III, 1, 109 H4A III, 1, 109 H6A I, 2, 99. H6B III, 2, 98. R3 V, 3, 299. H8 I, 4, 20; cf. Mcb. III, 4, 10. Troil. I, 3, 43. Cor. I, 1, 48. I, 6, 51. Caes. V, 2, 2. Hml. I, 1, 85. Lr. I, 4, 205. III, 7, 71. Ant. III, 9, 1. to turn the wrong s. out == to pervert, to distort, to derange: “so turns she every man the wrong s. out,” Ado III, 1, 68. “how quickly the wrong s. may be turned outward,” Tw. III, 1, 14. Lr. IV, 2, 9. Oth. II, 3, 54. cf. “that turned your wit the seamy s. without,” IV, 2, 146. Of after s. omitted: “writ o' both --s the leaf,” LLL V, 2, 8. “upon this s. the sea,” John II, 488. “on this s. Tiber,” Caes. III, 2, 254. “to keep one's eyes of either s. 's nose,” Lr. I, 5, 22 (== on either side his nose; cf. Of). “look out o' the other s. your monument,” Ant. IV, 15, 8. cf. II, 2, 206.
Hence, generally, one of two parts, or directions, or respects, placed in contradistinction to each other: “this s. is Hiems, winter, this Ver,” LLL V, 2, 901. “Armado o'th' one s., and his page o' t' other,” IV, 1, 146. IV, 1, 146 “then, on the other s., I checked my friends,” R3 III, 7, 150. “my back o' t' other s.” Rom. II, 5, 51. == line of descent, as only from one of the two parents: “brother by the mother's s.” John I, 163. Tit. IV, 2, 126. Ant. II, 2, 120. Oftenest == party, opposed interest, one of two at war: “Fortune shall cull forth out of one s. her happy minion,” John II, 392. “which is the s. that I must go withal?” III, 1, 327. “we of the offering s.” H4A IV, 1, 69. “both --s fiercely fought,” H6C II, 1, 121. “there is expectance here from both the --s,” Troil. IV, 5, 146. “the one s. must have bale,” Cor. I, 1, 167. “these are a s. that would be glad to have this true,” IV, 6, 151. “which s. should win,” V, 3, 113. “each in either s. give the all-hail to thee,” V, 3, 113 “damnable both-sides rogue,” All's IV, 3, 251. “hardly shall I carry out my s.” Lr. V, 1, 61 (== be a winner in the game). Preceded by on: “upon thy s. against myself I'll fight,” Sonn. 88, 3. “on both --s thus is simple truth suppressed,” 138, 8. Compl. 113. Meas. IV, 6, 6. LLL IV, 1, 76. LLL IV, 1, 76 LLL IV, 1, 76 IV, 3, 8. Tw. V, 69. Tw. V, 69 Wint. II, 3, 191. IV, 4, 650. John III, 1, 117. John III, 1, 117 John III, 1, 117 V, 2, 8. R2 II, 2, 89. R2 II, 2, 89 H4A II, 4, 348. V, 1, 99. H4B I, 1, 198. I, 2, 88. H6A I, 2, 3. II, 4, 20. II, 4, 20 II, 4, 20 II, 4, 20 II, 4, 20 II, 4, 20 II, 4, 20 V, 1, 10. H6B IV, 8, 54. R3 I, 4, 272. III, 2, 53. V, 3, 94. V, 3, 94 V, 3, 94 V, 5, 12. H8 II, 4, 4 “(on all --s).” H8 II, 4, 4. I, 1, 93. V, 4, 10. Cor. III, 1, 181. Rom. II, 4, 169. Caes. II, 4, 6. IV, 3, 4. Mcb. V, 7, 25. Hml. II, 2, 370. V, 2, 272. V, 2, 272 Lr. V, 3, 49. Oth. I, 3, 217. Ant. III, 10, 9. Cymb. V, 3, 81. of for on: “let us take the law of our --s,” Rom. I, 1, 44. 54 (the servant's speech). Preceded by to: “to train ten thousand English to their s.” John III, 4, 175. “flieth to his s.” H6A I, 1, 95.
4) any external part in respect to its direction or situation: “the blood circles her body in on every s.” Lucr. 1739. “whose western s. is with a vineyard backed,” Meas. IV, 1, 29. “on the east s. of the grove,” H6B II, 1, 43. H6B II, 1, 43 “pry on every s.” R3 III, 5, 6. “upon the north s. of this pleasant chase,” Tit. II, 3, 255. “puffs away from thence, turning his s. to the dew-dropping south,” Rom. I, 4, 103 (== turning to the side of the dew-dropping south. The surreptitious Q1 and M. Edd. face). “as he was coming from this churchyard s.” V, 3, 186.
5) margin, verge, border: “close by the Thames s.” Wiv. III, 3, 16. “I would you had been by the ship s.” Wint. III, 3, 112. “thy cheek's s. struck off,” H6A I, 4, 75. “on our long-boat's s. strike off his head,” H6B IV, 1, 68. “on the forest s.” H6C IV, 6, 83. “to the water s. I must conduct your grace,” H8 II, 1, 95. “that westward rooteth from the city's s.” Rom. I, 1, 129. “abuts against the island's s.” Per. V, 1, 52.
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