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Sight, 1) the sense of seeing, faculty of vision: “her s. dazzling makes the wound seem three,” Ven. 1064. “sweets that shall the truest s. beguile,” Ven. 1064 “the sun bereaves our s.” Lucr. 373. “my soul's imaginary s. pretents thy shadow to my sightless view,” Sonn. 27, 9. 148, 2. 150, 3. Tp. I, 2, 302. Err. III, 2, 57. Mids. III, 2, 369. As V, 4, 124. As V, 4, 124 As V, 4, 124 H4B III, 2, 336 “(thick s.).” IV, 4, 110. H5 IV, 7, 62. H6B I, 2, 6. II, 1, 64. II, 1, 64 II, 1, 64 R3 IV, 4, 26. H8 IV, 2, 108. Troil. I, 2, 31. Cor. III, 2, 5. Tit. II, 3, 195 “(dull).” III, 2, 84 “(thy s. is young).” Rom. I, 5, 54. Caes. V, 3, 21 “(thick).” Mcb. II, 1, 37. II, 3, 76. Hml. III, 4, 78. Lr. IV, 6, 20. Lr. IV, 6, 20 V, 3, 282 “(dull).” Oth. V, 2, 364. Perhaps == insight, knowledge, skill, in Troil. III, 3, 4; but the passage seems to be corrupt.
2) the eyes: “his louring brows o'erwhelming his fair s.” Ven. 183. “the object that did feed her s.” Ven. 183 “nor could she moralize his wanton s.” Lucr. 104. “it beguiled attention, charmed the s.” Lucr. 104 “sets you most rich in youth before my s.” Sonn. 15, 10. “if aught in me worthy perusal stand against thy s.” 38, 6. “shadows like to thee do mock my s.” 61, 4. “to every place at once, and nowhere fixed, the mind and s. distractedly commixed,” Compl. 28. “weak --s their sickly radiance do amend,” Compl. 28 “the turtle saw his right flaming in the Phoenix' s.” Phoen. 35. “we must starve our s. from lover's food,” Mids. I, 1, 222. “take this charm from off her s.” II, 1, 183. “laid the love-juice on some true-love's s.” III, 2, 89. “never more abase our s. so low as to vouchsafe one glance unto the ground,” H6B I, 2, 15. “in s. of God and us your guilt is great,” II, 3, 2. “kill the innocent gazer with thy s.” III, 2, 53. “to rob my s. of thy land's view,” III, 2, 53 “to greet mine own land with my wishful s.” H6C III, 1, 14. “if I be so disgracious in your s.” R3 IV, 4, 177 (Ff eye). “the bleared --s are spectacled to see him,” Cor. II, 1, 221. “schoolboys' tears take up the glasses of my s.” III, 2, 117. “amazed my s.” Mcb. V, 1, 86. “looked upon this love with idle s.” Hml. II, 2, 138. “strike the s. of the duke,” Lr. IV, 6, 283. “a scorpion to her s.” Cymb. V, 5, 45. “why cloud they not their --s,” Per. I, 1, 74. “to glad the s.” I, 4, 28.
Hence, as eyes, == presence: “quit my s.” Mcb. III, 4, 93. “avoid my s.” Lr. I, 1, 126. “should transport me farthest from your s.” Sonn. 117, 8. “banished from her s.” Gent. III, 2, 2. R2 IV, 315. H6B II, 3, 103. III, 2, 394. Tit. III, 1, 284. Mcb. III, 1, 119. Hml. I, 2, 220. Lr. II, 4, 190. Cymb. I, 1, 125. V, 5, 237. “in my s. forbear to glance thine eye aside,” Sonn. 139, 5. “never come in my s. more,” As IV, 1, 41. As IV, 1, 41 Shr. II, 30. Tw. III, 2, 20. III, 4, 171. R2 I, 1, 188. I, 2, 38. V, 2, 86. H4B IV, 1, 179. H6B I, 1, 11. IV, 2, 189. III, 2, 389. H6C III, 3, 181. R3 I, 3, 164. V, 3, 96. Tit. I, 246. III, 1, 67. Rom. II, 6, 5. Lr. IV, 6, 35. Lr. IV, 6, 35 “return no more into my s.” Gent. I, 2, 47. IV, 4, 65. Mcb. I, 3, 102. “durst not come near your s.” H4A V, 1, 63. “God keep him out of my s.” Ado II, 1, 113. “out of my s.!” Tw. IV, 1, 53. As IV, 1, 221. John IV, 2, 242. H4A V, 1, 66. H6B III, 2, 48. R3 I, 2, 149. Lr. I, 1, 159. Oth. IV, 1, 258. “bring me to the s. of Isabella,” Meas. I, 4, 18. “you shall not be admitted to his s.” IV, 3, 125. Shr. Ind. 2, 76. R3 IV, 1, 25. “come not within his s.” Mids. II, 1, 19.
3) the act of seeing, look, view: “his eyes, whose --s till then were levelled on my face,” Compl. 282. “at the first s. they have changed eyes,” Tp. I, 2, 440. “at first s.” As III, 5, 82. Troil. V, 2, 9.
4) the manner of seeing: “nothing else with his proud s. agrees,” Ven. 288. the s. whereof (your eye) “I think you had from me,” Ado V, 4, 25. “none could be so abused in s. as he,” As III, 5, 80.
5) the perceiving or being perceived by the eye, view, Lat. conspectus: “our sport is not in s.” Ven. 124 (cannot be seen). “wear the favours most in s.” LLL V, 2, 136. “vanished out of s.” Sonn. 63, 7. R3 III, 5, 107. “lacked s. only,” Wint. II, 1, 177. “the dismallest object that ever eye with s. made heart lament,” Tit. II, 3, 205. “you know him well by s.” Caes. I, 3, 15. Relatively: “he fed them with his s., they him with berries,” Ven. 1104. “melted like a vapour from her s.” Ven. 1104 “each under eye doth homage to his new-appearing s.” Sonn. 7, 3. “to divide the conquest of thy s.” 46, 2. “feasting on your s.” 75, 9. “heart hath his hope, and eyes their wished s.” Pilgr. 202. “every slight occasion that could give me s. of her,” Wiv. II, 2, 205. “upon their s. we two will fly,” IV, 4, 54. to stick it (the rod) “in their children's s.” Meas. I, 3, 25. “in our s. they three were taken up,” Err. I, 1, 111. to-morrow you shall have a s. of them (papers) LLL II, 166. “to have his s.” Mids. I, 1, 251. “at his s. away his fellows fly,” III, 2, 24. “takest true delight in the s. of thy former lady's eye,” III, 2, 24 “I trust to take of truest Thisbe s.” V, 280. “good wrestling, which you have lost the s. of,” As I, 2, 117. “the s. of lovers feedeth those in love,” III, 4, 60. III, 5, 4. Shr. Ind. 2, 61. I, 1, 225. Tw. I, 2, 41. Wint. II, 2, 40. III, 3, 139. IV, 4, 481. IV, 4, 481 IV, 4, 481 V, 3, 57. John II, 222. III, 1, 36. IV, 2, 219. R2 II, 3, 18. III, 2, 52. H4A III, 2, 88. IV, 5, 230. H6A I, 1, 30. V, 3, 69. V, 4, 122. H6B I, 1, 32. IV, 4, 46. V, 1, 90. V, 2, 49. H6C I, 3, 30. II, 5, 130 “(having the flying hare in s.).” Cor. V, 3, 98. Tit. V, 1, 4. Rom. III, 2, 56. Tim. I, 1, 255 “(joyful of your --s).” Tim. I, 1, 255 IV, 3, 125. Ant. III, 10, 17. Per. V Prol. Per. V Prol. V, 1, 33.
6) things seen or to be seen, show, spectacle, vision: “what a s. it was,” Ven. 343. “doth view the s. which makes supposed terror true,” Lucr. 455. “daunts them with more dreadful --s,” Lucr. 455 “to see sad --s moves more than hear them told,” Lucr. 455 “moan the expense of many a vanished s.” Sonn. 30, 8. “if we see the rudest or gentlest s.” 113, 9. “but dressings of a former s.” 123, 4. “here's a goodly s.” Tp. V, 260. “you may say what --s you see; I see things too,” Gent. I, 2, 138. Mids. IV, 1, 51. As III, 2, 255. All's III, 5, 2. Wint. III, 3, 107. Wint. III, 3, 107 IV, 4, 849 (we must show our strange --s, i. e. things worth seeing; the clown's speech). V, 2, 46. H6A I, 4, 62. H6C II, 2, 6. R3 I, 4, 3. R3 I, 4, 3 H8 IV, 1, 11. V, 2, 20. Tit. II, 3, 216. II, 4, 53. III, 1, 247. III, 1, 247 III, 1, 247 V, 1, 52. Rom. I, 2, 105. IV, 5, 42. V, 3, 174. V, 3, 174 Caes. I, 3, 138. II, 2, 16. III, 2, 206. V, 3, 78. Mcb. II, 2, 21. III, 4, 114. IV, 1, 122. IV, 1, 122 Hml. I, 1, 25. I, 2, 247. IV, 7, 100. V, 2, 373. V, 2, 373 V, 2, 373 Lr. IV, 6, 85. Lr. IV, 6, 85 Oth. V, 2, 207. Oth. V, 2, 207 Ant. IV, 15, 40.
7) aperture for the eyes in a helmet: “their eyes of fire sparkling through --s of steel,” H4B IV, 1, 121.
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