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Sit (impf. and partic. sat) 1) to be in a position of rest (on the buttocks, as animals, or on the feet, as birds): Ven. 349. Ven. 349 Pilgr. 143. Tp. I, 2, 223. Tp. I, 2, 223 III, 1, 28. Gent. V, 4, 4. Wiv. III, 1, 24. Meas. II, 1, 66. Meas. II, 1, 66 Meas. II, 1, 66 Err. IV, 4, 36. Ado II, 1, 332. LLL IV, 3, 165. Mids. II, 1, 149. II, 2, 150. As II, 4, 37. Tw. II, 4, 117. H5 II, 2, 27. H6B I, 2, 36. H6C I, 1, 50. H6C I, 1, 50 H6C I, 1, 50 Caes. I, 1, 45. Ant. II, 2, 196 etc. “s. you fast,” H6C IV, 1, 119. “s. fast,” V, 2, 3. “s. still,” Tp. I, 2, 170. Mcb. III, 4, 108. “s. at dinner,” Err. I, 2, 62. Ant. II, 1, 12. “at supper,” Gent. II, 1, 46. R3 II, 4, 10. “at any good man's feast,” As II, 7, 115. “at a play,” Hml. II, 2, 618. “he does s. in gold,” Cor. V, 1, 63; cf. V, 4, 22. stalk on, the fowl --s (and may, therefore, easily be caught) Ado II, 3, 96. “birds s. brooding in the snow,” LLL V, 2, 933. “o'er which his melancholy --s on brood,” Hml. III, 1, 173. “to s. in the stocks,” Gent. IV, 4, 33. All's IV, 3, 116. R2 V, 5, 26. R2 V, 5, 26 Lr. II, 2, 141. II, 4, 114. Denoting any state of rest and inactivity: “stand, . . . if not, we'll make you s. and rifle you,” Gent. IV, 1, 4. “York must s. and fret and bite his tongue,” H6B I, 1, 230. “I have sat too long,” Cor. V, 3, 131 (but cf. Sitting). “till then s. still, my soul,” Hml. I, 2, 257.
To s. out == not to take part: LLL I, 1, 110 (an expression taken from the card-table).
2) to set one's self down, to take a seat: Ven. 17. Compl. 65. 66 “(being sat).” Tp. IV, 1, 32. Wiv. I, 1, 289. Merch. V, 58. As V, 3, 8. H4B IV, 5, 182. H6C III, 3, 16 (s. thee by our side; thee nom. or accus.?) etc. With “down:” Ven. 325. Tp. I, 2, 32. III, 1, 23. III, 3, 6. Err. III, 1, 33. LLL I, 1, 239. Mids. III, 1, 75. Merch. II, 6, 9. H6C III, 3, 2. H8 IV, 1, 65. IV, 2, 81. Tit. IV, 2, 132. Hml. I, 1, 30. Ant. III, 11, 28 etc. “s. you down,” Meas. V, 366. As II, 7, 124. “s. thee down,” LLL I, 1, 317. Mids. IV, 1, 1. Caes. V, 5, 4 (you and thee nom. or accus.?).
3) to hold a session, to be engaged in public business: “s. with my cousin,” Meas. V, 246. “let the crowner s. o' my coz,” Tw. I, 5, 143. Hml. V, 1, 4. “to s. with us once more,” H5 V, 2, 80. “sat in the council-house,” H6B I, 1, 90. “long --ing to determine poor men's causes,” IV, 7, 93. “to s. about the coronation,” R3 III, 1, 173. “the gods s. in hourly synod about thy particular prosperity,” Cor. V, 2, 74. 3, 131. “s. in council,” Caes. IV, 1, 45. “le's s. together,” Lr. I, 1, 308 (Qq hit). “and in session s. with meditations lawful,” Oth. III, 3, 140. “the senate-house of planets all did s. to knit in her their best perfections,” Per. I, 1, 10. “we s. too long on trifles,” II, 3, 92.
4) to be or stay or remain in a place: and there (the snail) “all smothered up, in shade doth s.” Ven. 1035. “in the Bunch of Grapes, where you have a delight to s.” Meas. II, 1, 134. “I have sat here all day,” IV, 1, 20. “he shows me where the bachelors s.” Ado II, 1, 51. “the god of love that --s above,” V, 2, 27. “here upon thy cheek the stain doth s. of an old tear,” Rom. II, 3, 75. == to be about a sick person: John IV, 1, 30. H4B IV, 5, 20. H4B IV, 5, 20 cf. R3 I, 4, 73 (Ff s. by me, Qq stay by me). to s. up == not to go to bed: Rom. IV, 3, 10.
5) to have a seat, to be placed, to dwell: “whether beauty, birth, or wealth or wit . . . entitled in their parts do crowned s.” Sonn. 37, 7; cf. “that cruel eye where he --s crowned,” Tw. V, 131; “upon thy eye-balls murderous tyranny --s in grim majesty,” H6B III, 2, 50. “no love toward others in that bosom --s,” Sonn. 9, 13; “as if allegiance in their bosoms sat,” H5 II, 2, 4. “much more than in my verse can s. your own glass shows you,” Sonn. 103, 13. “the attribute to awe and majesty, wherein doth s. the dread and fear of kings,” Merch. IV, 1, 192. “my mother told me just how he would woo, as if she sat in his heart,” All's IV, 2, 70. “O, s. my husband's wrongs on Hereford's spear,” R2 I, 2, 47. “his treasons will s. blushing in his face,” III, 2, 51. “every honour --ing on his helm,” H4A III, 2, 142; “everlasting shame --s mocking in our plumes,” H5 IV, 5, 5; “fortune and victory s. on thy helm,” R3 V, 3, 79; victory --s on our helms, 351; “upon your sword s. laurel victory,” Ant. I, 3, 100. now --s Expectation in the air, H5 II Prol. 8. “to make an envious mountain on my back, where --s deformity to mock my body,” H6C III, 2, 158. “within thine eye sat twenty thousand deaths,” Cor. III, 3, 70. “take our good meaning, for our judgment --s five times in that ere once in our five wits,” Rom. I, 4, 46. “is there no pity --ing in the clouds,” III, 5, 198. “policy --s above conscience,” Tim. III, 2, 94 (has a higher place, is above c.). “he --s high in all the people's hearts,” Caes. I, 3, 157.
6) to be in a situation or condition: “I s. at twenty pounds a week,” Wiv. I, 3, 8. “under your hard construction must I s.” Tw. III, 1, 126. “Rome --s safe and still without him,” Cor. IV, 6, 37.
7) to lie, to bear on, to be felt: “your brother's death --s at your heart,” Meas. V, 394. “woe doth the heavier s., where it perceives it is but faintly borne,” R2 I, 3, 280. “let me s. heavy on thy soul to-morrow,” R3 V, 3, 118. R3 V, 3, 118 R3 V, 3, 118 “amazement on thy mother --s,” Hml. III, 4, 112. Peculiar expression: “this accord of Hamlet --s smiling to my heart,” Hml. I, 2, 124 (cf. “unclog my heart of what lies heavy to't,” Cor. IV, 2, 48). In All's II, 1, 147 O. Edd. oft it hits where hope is coldest and despair most --s; M. Edd. fits.
8) With down, == to begin a siege: “all places yield to him ere he --s down,” Cor. IV, 7, 28. In All's I, 1, 129 and Ant. III, 13, 168 O. Edd. set, most M. Edd. sit.
9) Used of clothes or ornaments worn: here it (the crown) “--s,” H4B IV, 5, 43. H4B IV, 5, 43 The sense modified by adverbs and adjectives: “how well my garments s. upon me,” Tp. II, 1, 272. “O majesty, when thou dost pinch thy bearer, thou dost s. like a rich armour worn in heat of day,” H4B IV, 5, 29. “our old robes s. easier than our new,” Mcb. II, 4, 38. Metaphorically: “these fixed evils s. so fit in him,” All's I, 1, 113 (in == on). “this new and gorgeous garment majesty --s not so easy on me as you think,” H4B V, 2, 45.
10) Used of the wind, == to have a direction: “--s the wind in that corner?” Ado II, 3, 102. “to know where --s the wind,” Merch. I, 1, 18. “we see the wind s. sore upon our sails,” R2 II, 1, 265. “the wind --s fair for news to go to Ireland,” II, 2, 123. H5 II, 2, 12. “the wind -- s in the shoulder of your sail,” Hml. I, 3, 56. “an thou canst not smile as the wind -- s,” Lr. I, 4, 113. “though my reason --s in the wind against me,” Ant. III, 10, 37.
11) Refl., with down, == set: “would shut the book and s. him down and die,” H4B III, 1, 56. “here will I s. me down,” H6C II, 5, 14. “I sat me down,” Hml. V, 2, 31 (in Meas. V, 366. LLL I, 1, 110. LLL I, 1, 110 Mids. IV, 1, 1. As II, 7, 124. H6C III, 3, 16. IV, 1, 119. Caes. V, 5, 4 thee and you may be nominatives).
12) Transitively, == to keep the seat on: “he could not s. his mule,” H8 IV, 2, 16.
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