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Slander, vb. 1) to defame, to calumniate; abs.: Ado V, 1, 95. With an object: Gent. III, 2, 38. Meas. V, 290. Meas. V, 290 Ado IV, 1, 304. Ado IV, 1, 304 V, 1, 88. V, 1, 88 Merch. V, 22. John IV, 2, 256. H4A III, 3, 150. R3 I, 4, 247. IV, 4, 207. Cor. I, 1, 78. Rom. IV, 1, 35. Oth. III, 3, 368. to s. with == to reproach with: “to s. Valentine with falsehood,” Gent. III, 2, 31. “he --ed me with bastardy,” John I, 74. “let not him be --ed with revolt,” H4A I, 3, 112. “--s me with murder's crimson badge,” H6B III, 2, 200. “thy tongue that --s him with cowardice,” H6C I, 4, 47.
2) to disgrace: “now is black beauty's successive heir, and beauty --ed with a bastard shame,” Sonn. 127, 4. “--ing creation with a false esteem,” Sonn. 127, 4 “tax not so bad a voice to s. music any more than once,” Ado II, 3, 47. “I would not have you so s. any moment leisure as to give words or talk with the Lord Hamlet,” Hml. I, 3, 133. “disdaining me . . . --s so her judgment that what's else rare is choked,” Cymb. III, 5, 76.
3) to detract from, to disparage: “the sentence that you have --ed so,” Meas. II, 4, 110. “the leaf of eglantine, whom not to s., out-sweetened not thy breath,” Cymb. IV, 2, 223.
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