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Slave, subst. 1) a person who is absolutely subject to the will of another: Ven. 101. Lucr. 515. Sonn. 57, 1, 141, 12. Tp. I, 2, 270. Tp. I, 2, 270 Tp. I, 2, 270 Tp. I, 2, 270 Tp. I, 2, 270 Tp. I, 2, 270 Tp. I, 2, 270 Err. II, 1, 1. II, 2, 2. II, 2, 2 Merch. IV, 1, 90. Merch. IV, 1, 90 As III, 2, 162. Shr. I, 1, 224. II, 2. John V, 2, 97. R2 IV, 251. H6A I, 5, 32. V, 3, 113. Tim. I, 1, 71. IV, 3, 391. Caes. I, 3, 15. III, 2, 25. IV, 3, 43. Lr. II, 4, 219. III, 2, 19. V, 3, 221. Oth. III, 3, 135. 158 etc. Metaphorically; with a genitive: “soft fancy's s.” Lucr. 200. “the gross world's baser --s,” LLL I, 1, 30. “a king, woe's s.” R2 III, 2, 210. “fortune's --s,” V, 5, 24. “passion's s.” Hml. III, 2, 77. “the --s of chance,” Wint. IV, 4, 551. “thought's the s. of life,” H4A V, 4, 81 (depends on life). “the --s of drink and thralls of sleep,” Mcb. III, 6, 13. “hot summer's tanlings and the shrinking --s of winter,” Cymb. IV, 4, 30. With to: “eater of youth, false s. to false delight,” Lucr. 927. “brass eternal s. to mortal rage,” Sonn. 64, 4 (i. e. subject to). “s. to slavery my sweetest friend must be,” 133, 4. Tp. III, 1, 66. Gent. III, 1, 141. H8 I, 2, 64. Troil. III, 2, 90. Rom. V, 3, 221. Hml. III, 2, 198.
2) an abject person, a wretch: “like straggling --s for pillage fighting,” Lucr. 428. “let him have time to live a loathed s.” Lucr. 428 “death's-man to so base a s.” Lucr. 428 “base intruder, overweening s.” Gent. III, 1, 157. “an unmannerly s., that will thrust himself into secrets,” Gent. III, 1, 157 a s. that still an end turns me to shame, IV 4, 67. “hang 'em, --s,” Wiv. II, 1, 179. Err. I, 2, 87. Err. I, 2, 87 II, 1, 75. II, 1, 75 IV, 1, 96. V, 241. Ado V, 1, 272. LLL I, 2, 159. Shr. IV, 1, 169. IV, 3, 31. All's II, 3, 144. IV, 3, 159. V, 3, 205. John I, 222. III, 1, 123. H4A II, 4, 288. IV, 2, 19. IV, 2, 19 H6A 1, 2, 1, 2 IV, 5, 15. H6B IV, 1, 67. R3 I, 2, 90. IV, 4, 144. V, 4, 9. H8 V, 4, 3. Rom. 1, 1, 1, 1 Tim. II, 2, 174. III, 1, 59 (cf. Unto). IV, 3, 33. Mcb. I, 2, 20. Lr. 1, 4, 1, 4 Oth. IV, 2, 132. V, 2, 292. Cymb. IV, 2, 72. 74 etc. “thou wast sealed in thy nativity the s. of nature and the son of hell,” R3 I, 3, 230 (i. e. thou wast marked and destined to be mean and contemptible by nature. cf. Cymb. V, 2, 5. see Nature).
Sometimes used (like wretch) with some tenderness: “stay, s., I must employ thee,” LLL III, 152. LLL III, 152 “O --s, I can tell you news,” Cor. IV, 5, 181. “how the black s. smiles upon the father,” Tit. IV, 2, 120. “come on, you thick-lipped s.” Tit. IV, 2, 120 “peace, tawny s.” V, 1, 27. cf. Err. II, 2, 2.
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