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Sleep, vb. (impf. and partic. slept) to take rest by a suspension of the voluntary exercise of the bodily and mental powers: Ven. 786. Sonn. 154, 8. Tp. I, 2, 305. Tp. I, 2, 305 II, 1, 190. II, 1, 190 II, 1, 190 III, 2, 96. III, 2, 96 Gent. I, 1, 80. II, 4, 141. III, 1, 334. Wiv. III, 5, 142. V, 5, 54. Meas. IV, 3, 35. Err. I, 2, 14. II, 2, 185. II, 2, 185 V, 63. Mids. IV, 1, 152 (half s., half waking; the suffix ing belonging to both words). etc. etc. “to s. fast,” Lucr. 360. “to s. sound,” Lucr. 360 Wiv. V, 5, 56. Meas. IV, 3, 50. Mids. II, 2, 74. III, 2, 449. H4B IV, 5, 26. Caes. II, 1, 233 etc. “to s. soundly:” Shr. Ind. 1, 33. H5 IV, 1, 285. “--ing hour,” Mids. III, 2, 8. As III, 2, 102. Troil. I, 3, 254. “a --ing potion,” Rom. V, 3, 244. to s. on sth. == a) to pass in sleep: “ne'er may I look on day nor s. on night,” Err. V, 210. b) to neglect, to be inattentive to: “heaven will one day open the king's eyes, that so long have slept upon this bold bad man,” H8 II, 2, 43. “why do fond men expose themselves to battle and not endure all threats? s. upon 't and let the foes quietly cut their throats?” Tim. III, 5, 43. With an accus. denoting the effect: “we did s. day out of countenance,” Ant. II, 2, 181. to s. out == to pass and forget in sleep: All's V, 3, 66. Wint. III, 3, 61. IV, 3, 31. Lr. II, 2, 163. Ant. I, 5, 5. With an accus. of time: “never slept a quiet hour,” R3 V, 3, 160. H8 Epil. R3 V, 3, 160 “s. thou a quiet sleep,” R3 V, 3, 164 (cf. Cymb. V, 4, 178). “I have not slept one wink,” Cymb. III, 4, 103.
Used of death: Ven. 951. Ado V, 1, 70. H4A V, 4, 100. H4B IV, 4, 61. R3 IV, 3, 38. H8 III, 2, 398. H8 III, 2, 398 V, 1, 32. V, 5, 40. Rom. V, 1, 18. Mcb. III, 2, 23. Ant. V, 2, 7 etc.
Denoting any state of entire repose and quiet, or of idleness and inefficacy: “therefore have I slept in your report,” Sonn. 83, 5. “let'st thy fortune s.” Tp. II, 1, 216. “hath he any eyes? hath he any thinking? sure, they s.” Wiv. III, 2, 31. “the law hath not been dead, though it hath slept,” Meas. II, 2, 90. “why should a man s. when he wakes,” Merch. I, 1, 85. “how sweet the moonlight --s upon this bank,” V, 54 (lies still and silent). “all proofs --ing else but what your jealousies awake,” Wint. III, 2, 113. “those --ing stones,” John II, 216. where hath it (our intelligence) “slept,” IV, 2, 117. “awaked the --ing rheum,” R2 I, 4, 8. “peace shall go s. with Turks and infidels,” IV, 139. “a kind of --ing in the blood,” H4B I, 2, 128. “awake our --ing sword of war,” H5 I, 2, 22. “we die, while remiss traitors s.” H6A IV, 3, 29. “--ing neglection,” H6A IV, 3, 29 “our title still had slept,” H6C II, 2, 160. “where slept our scouts?” V, 1, 19. when didst thou (God) “s. when such a deed was done?” R3 IV, 4, 24. “you have ever wished the --ing of this business,” H8 II, 4, 163. “our office may during his power go s.” Cor. II, 1, 239. hath it (hope) “slept since?” Mcb. I, 7, 36. “do not s., but let me hear from you,” Hml. I, 3, 3. “a knavish speech --s in a foolish ear,” IV, 2, 25. “have a father killed, a mother stained, excitements of my reason and my blood, and let all s.” IV, 4, 59. “nor the redresses s.” Lr. I, 4, 229. “truth can never be confirmed enough, though doubts did ever s.” Per. V, 1, 204.
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