previous next
Spirit (dissyll. and monosyll.) 1) vital power, life: “the expense of s. in a waste of shame is lust in action,” Sonn. 129, 1. the breath of heaven hath blown his (the coal's) “s. out,” John IV, 1, 110. “now my s. is going; I can no more,” Ant. IV, 15, 58. Plur. --s: “my --s, as in a dream, are all bound up,” Tp. I, 2, 486. “my --s are nimble,” II, 1, 202. “weariness, to the dulling of my --s,” III, 3, 6. “these things smother her --s up,” Ado IV, 1, 113. “thought I thy --s were stronger than thy shames,” Ado IV, 1, 113 LLL IV, 3, 306. As II, 4, 1. All's V, 1, 2. Wint. V, 3, 41. John II, 232. Cymb. I, 5, 41 etc. Cf. Loening, Shakespeare- Jahrb. XXXI, 13.
2) vivacity, mettle, fire, courage: “defect of s., life and bold audacity,” Lucr. 1346. “I do applaud thy s.” Gent. V, 4, 140. “I have s. to do any thing,” Meas. III, 1, 213. “all things are with more s. chased than enjoyed,” Merch. II, 6, 13. “woo her with some s.” Shr. II, 170. “let thy blood and s. embrace them,” Tw. II, 5, 160. “threw off his s., his appetite, his sleep,” Wint. II, 3, 16. John V, 4, 2. H4A IV, 1, 101. H6B III, 2, 308. H6C I, 2, 43. R3 III, 4, 52. Cor. I, 5, 14. Cymb. V, 3, 35 etc. Plur. --s: “summon up your dearest --s,” LLL II, 1. “pluck up thy --s,” Shr. IV, 3, 38. “you do draw my --s from me with new lamenting ancient oversights,” H4B II, 3, 46. H5 II, 1, 72. H6A V, 2, 1. H6C II, 2, 56. Ant. III, 13, 69. V, 2, 173 etc.
3) temper, disposition, sentiments: “I measure him by my own s., for I should flout him,” Ado II, 3, 149. “the man hath a contemptible s.” Ado II, 3, 149 “his jesting s.” III, 2, 60. “a man of great s.” LLL I, 2, 2. it (reckoning) “fitteth the s. of a tapster,” LLL I, 2, 2 “of such a merry, nimble, stirring s.” V, 2, 16. “that's the way to choke a gibing s.” V, 2, 16 “allay with some cold drops of modesty thy skipping s.” Merch. II, 2, 196. “thou shalt see the difference of our s.” IV, 1, 368 (Q1 -- s). III, 2, 165. III, 4, 15. IV, 1, 133. As I, 1, 23. As I, 1, 23 Tw. I, 5, 311. John I, 167. IV, 2, 176. IV, 3, 9. V, 1, 53. H5 III, 5, 38. R3 IV, 4, 196. Rom. V, 1, 4. Cymb. I, 5, 34 etc. Plur. --s: “my --s to attend this double voice accorded,” Compl. 3. “these well express in thee thy latter --s,” Tim. V, 4, 74. “that I may pour my --s in thine ear,” Mcb. I, 5, 27. “your --s shine through you,” III, 1, 128. “that no revenue hast but thy good --s,” Hml. III, 2, 63 etc.
4) mental power, vigor of intellect: was it his s. . . . that struck me dead? Sónn. 86, 5. “a foolish extravagant s., full of forms,” LLL IV, 2, 68. “I have perhaps some shallow s. of judgment,” H6A II, 4, 16. “so much is my poverty of s.” R3 III, 7, 159.
5) that which pervades and tempers the whole mind, or the whole state and nature of a thing (often used periphrastically, when followed by of): “April hath put a s. of youth in every thing,” Sonn. 98, 3. “do not kill the s. of love with a perpetual dulness,” 56, 8. “if the gentle s. of moving words can no way change you,” Gent. V, 4, 55. “the s. of wantonness is scared out of him,” Wiv. IV, 2, 223. “awake the pert and nimble s. of mirth,” Mids. I, 1, 13. “O s. of love, how quick and fresh art thou,” Tw. I, 1, 9. “the s. of humours intimate reading aloud to him,” II, 5, 93. “God give thee the s. of persuasion,” H4A I, 2, 170. “as if he mastered there a double s. of teaching and of learning,” V, 2, 64. “the dove and very blessed s. of peace,” H4B IV, 1, 46. “conjure up the s. of love in her,” H5 V, 2, 316. “the s. of deep prophecy she hath,” H6A I, 2, 55. “O thou invisible s. of wine,” Oth. II, 3, 283. “to whose soft seizure the cygnet's down is harsh and s. of sense hard as the palm of ploughman,” Troil. I, 1, 58 (i. e. sense or sensibility itself). “the eye itself, that most pure s. of sense,” III, 3, 106 (i. e. which is sense itself, the very emblem of perceptivity). Without of: “love is a s. all compact of fire,” Ven. 149. “that surly s., melancholy,” John III, 3, 42. “death, that dark s., in's nervy arm doth lie,” Cor. II, 1, 177.
6) mind, soul: “appals her senses and her s. confounds,” Ven. 882. “my s. is thine, the better part of me,” Sonn. 74, 8. “their guilt now 'gins to bite the --s,” Tp. III, 3, 106. “--s are not finely touched but to fine issues,” Meas. I, 1, 36. “anything that appears not foul in the truth of my s.” III, 1, 214. “the delighted s. to bathe in fiery floods,” III, 1, 214 “my s. grows heavy in love,” LLL I, 2, 127. “the liberal opposition of our --s,” V, 2, 743. “tempt not too much the hatred of my s.” Mids. II, 1, 211. “giddy in s.” Merch. III, 2, 145. “quietness of s.” IV, 1, 12. “the motions of his s. are dull as night,” V, 86. “had our weak --s ne'er been higher reared,” Wint. I, 2, 72. “so be blest my s.!” V, 1, 71. “holding the eternal s., against her will, in the vile prison of afflicted breath,” John III, 4, 18. “his s. is come in,” V, 2, 70. “hear me speak with a prophetic s.” III, 4, 126. “when that this body did contain a s.” H4A V, 4, 89. “your s. is too true, your fears too certain,” H4B I, 1, 92 (cf. True). “whisper the --s of thine enemies,” R3 IV, 4, 192. “can thy s. wonder a great man should decline?” H8 III, 2, 374. “of s. so still and quiet,” Oth. I, 3, 95. “with a learned s.” III, 3, 259. “puddled his clear s.” III, 4, 143 etc. Plur. --s: “heaven give your --s comfort,” Meas. IV, 2, 73. “her --s are as coy and wild as haggards of the rock,” Ado III, 1, 35. “John the bastard, whose --s toil in frame of villanies,” IV, 1, 191. “your --s are attentive,” Merch. V, 70. “your --s are too bold for your years,” As I, 2, 183. “entame my --s to your worship,” III, 5, 48. “give a favour from you to sparkle in the --s of my daughter,” All's V, 3, 75. “with my vexed --s I cannot take a truce,” John III, 1, 17. “her wanton --s look out at every joint,” Troil. IV, 5, 56. “forth at your eyes your --s wildly peep,” Hml. III, 4, 119. “his --s should hunt after new fancies,” Oth. III, 4, 62. “make thy --s all of comfort,” Ant. III, 2, 41. “his --s fly out into my story,” Cymb. III, 3, 90 etc.
7) a human being, a person with respect to his kind or sphere of activity: “a better s. doth use your name,” Sonn. 80, 2. “every hymn that able s. affords,” 85, 7. “she was sought by --s of richest coat,” Compl. 236. “he's a s. of persuasion,” Tp. II, 1, 235 (cf. def. 5). “the afflicted --s here in the prison,” Meas. II, 3, 4. “that s. is possessed with haste that wounds the unsisting postern with these strokes,” IV, 2, 91. “is no bar to stop the foreign --s,” Merch. II, 7, 46. “I will not jump with common --s,” II, 9, 32. “the best conditioned and unwearied s. in doing courtesies,” III, 2, 295. “to be the snuff of younger --s,” All's I, 2, 60. “a braver choice of dauntless --s,” John II, 72. “these fiery --s,” V, 2, 114. “inland petty --s,” H4B IV, 3, 119. “the flat unraised --s,” H4B IV, 3, 119. “the choice and master --s of this age,” Caes. III, 1, 163. that s. upon whose weal depend and “rest the lives of many,” Hml. III, 3, 14. “noble swelling --s,” Oth. II, 3, 57. “there's a great s. gone,” Ant. I, 2, 126. “that huge s.” IV, 15, 89.
8) any supernatural being, an angel, a ghost, a demon, a fairy etc.: Sonn. 61, 5. 86, 5. 144, 2. Tp. I, 2, 193. Tp. I, 2, 193 Tp. I, 2, 193 Tp. I, 2, 193 Tp. I, 2, 193 Tp. I, 2, 193 Tp. I, 2, 193 Tp. I, 2, 193 II, 2, 3. II, 2, 3 II, 2, 3 III, 2, 102. IV, 1, 58. IV, 1, 58 IV, 1, 58 IV, 1, 58 V, 2. V, 2 V, 2 Epil. V, 2 Gent. III, 1, 195. Wiv. III, 3, 230. IV, 4, 35. IV, 4, 35 V, 2, 13. V, 5, 33. Meas. I, 4, 35. IV, 2, 76. Err. V, 334. LLL IV, 3, 257. Mids. II, 1, 1. Mids. II, 1, 1 II, 2, 7. III, 1, 157. III, 2, 382. III, 2, 382 Tw. V, 242. H4A II, 4, 405. H6A II, 1, 25. V, 3, 10. H6B I, 2, 79. H8 III, 2, 129. Caes. I, 2, 147. IV, 3, 282. Mcb. IV, 1, 112. Hml. I, 1, 171. I, 4, 6. Lr. IV, 2, 46. Oth. III, 4, 126. Ant. II, 3, 19. Cymb. V, 4, 93 etc. In Lr. II, 1, 78 Qq spurs.
hide Dictionary Entry Lookup
Use this tool to search for dictionary entries in all lexica.
Search for in
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: