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Sport, subst. 1) diversion; pastime; amusement; pleasure: “such time-beguiling s.” Ven. 24. “others delight in such-like circumstance, with such-like s.” Ven. 24 “his time of folly and his time of s.” Lucr. 992. “making lascivious comments on thy s.” Sonn. 95, 6. “some say thy grace is youth and gentle s.” 96, 2. “youth is full of s.” Pilgr. 161. “all our evening s. from us is fled,” Pilgr. 161 “there be some --s are painful,” Tp. III, 1, 1. “he strays with willing s. to the wild ocean,” Gent. II, 7, 32. “we have s. in hand,” Wiv. II, 1, 204. Wiv. II, 1, 204 III, 2, 82. III, 3, 180. IV, 6, 30. V, 2, 14. V, 5, 256. Err. V, 77. Err. V, 77 Ado II, 3, 223. LLL I, 1, 180. V, 2, 153. Mids. II, 1, 87. III, 2, 119. III, 2, 119 V, 79. V, 79 As I, 2, 26. As I, 2, 26 As I, 2, 26 As I, 2, 26 As I, 2, 26 As I, 2, 26 Shr. Ind. 1, 91. Tw. II, 1, 49. II, 3, 187. II, 5, 2. II, 5, 2 II, 5, 2 IV, 2, 76. John V, 2, 175. R2 III, 4, 1. R2 III, 4, 1 H4A II, 1, 78. II, 4, 430. H5 I, 1, 56 “(--s).” H6B III, 2, 338. Troil. II, 3, 117. Cor. II, 2, 109. Tit. III, 1, 239 “(--s).” IV, 3, 70. V, 1, 96. V, 1, 96 Rom. I, 5, 31. Rom. I, 5, 31 Tim. II, 2, 48. Caes. II, 1, 189 “(--s).” Hml. III, 2, 227. III, 4, 206. Lr. I, 1, 23. IV, 1, 39. Oth. I, 3, 376. Oth. I, 3, 376 II, 2, 6. IV, 3, 98. IV, 3, 98 Ant. I, 1, 47. I, 4, 29. IV, 7, 14. IV, 15, 32. Cymb. IV, 2, 31 “(I wish ye s.).” Per. V, 3, 41. to make s. to == to amuse: “to make us public s.” Wiv. IV, 4, 14. “one that makes s. to the prince,” LLL IV, 1, 101. “my lord made himself much s. out of him,” All's IV, 5, 68. “we'll make you some s. with the fox,” III, 6, 110. “thou wouldst be fee'd, I see, to make me s.” H6C I, 4, 92. to make s. == to amuse one's self; to take pleasure; to play: “let foolish gnats make s.” Err. II, 2, 30. “I with the morning's love have oft made s.” Mids. III, 2, 389. “wait on me home, I'll make s. with thee,” All's V, 3, 323. “misery makes s. to mock itself,” R2 II, 1, 85. “when she saw Pyrrhus make malicious s. in mincing her husband's limbs,” Hml. II, 2, 536.
Special significations: a) a play, or theatrical performance: “to our s., away!” LLL V, 1, 162. “might not you foretell our s.” V, 2, 473. V, 2, 473 V, 2, 473 “have made our s. a comedy,” V, 2, 473 “in their s. forsook his scene,” Mids. III, 2, 14. “this s., well carried, shall be chronicled,” Mids. III, 2, 14 “if our s. had gone forward,” IV, 2, 17. V, 42. “mark the moral of this s.” R2 IV, 290. “our wars will turn unto a peaceful comic s.” H6A II, 2, 45. “who set the body and the limbs of this great s. together?” H8 I, 1, 47. “at this s. Sir Valour dies,” Troil. I, 3, 175. “how many times shall Caesar bleed in s.” Caes. III, 1, 114. cf. Compl. 242 (?).
b) out of door diversions, especially the chase: Wiv. IV, 2, 35. LLL IV, 2, 1. H6B II, 1, 2. H6B II, 1, 2 Troil. IV, 5, 239 “(a book of s.).” Tit. II, 2, 19. II, 3, 197. Cymb. III, 3, 10. Used of bear-baiting: Wiv. I, 1, 302. Of war and fighting: “sheathe for lack of s.” H5 IV, 2, 23. “till fields and blows and groans applaud our s.” H4A I, 3, 302. “hark, what good s. is out of town today,” Troil. I, 1, 116. Troil. I, 1, 116
c) a game of hazard: “we shall never win at that s., and stake down,” Merch. III, 2, 219. “in our --s my better cunning faints under his chance,” Ant. II, 3, 34
d) amorous dallying; sensual enjoyment of love: “our s. is not in sight,” Ven. 124. “he had some feeling of the s.” Meas. III, 2, 127. “intercepted in your s.” Tit. II, 3, 80. “when the blood is made dull with the act of s.” Oth. II, 1, 230. “she is s. for Jove,” II, 3, 17. cf. Tit. V, 1, 96. Tit. V, 1, 96 Lr. I, 1, 23; and sportful in Shr. II, 263.
2) jest, as opposed to earnest: 'tis holy s. to be a little vain, when the sweet breath of flattery conquers “strife,” Err. III, 2, 27; cf. “of the same piece is every flatterer's s.” Tim. III, 2, 72 (M. Edd. spirit, port etc.). “in a merry s. let the forfeit be nominated for an equal pound of your fair flesh,” Merch. I, 3, 146. “what is this? s.?” Wint. II, 1, 58. “name not your loss your s.” Cymb. II, 4, 48. in s. == in jest: Ado I, 1, 179. As I, 2, 30. IV, 3, 157. Lr. II, 1, 37.
== contemptuous jesting, mockery: “you shall buy this s. as dear,” Err. IV, 1, 81. “would behold in me this shameful s.” IV, 4, 108. “to fashion this false s.” Mids. III, 2, 194. “all to make you s.” Mids. III, 2, 194 “he would make but a s. of it,” Ado II, 3, 163. to make s. at, or with, == to mock at: “make s. at me,” Wiv. III, 3, 160. “lest she make s. at it,” Ado III, 1, 58. “to make s. withal,” As I, 2, 28.
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