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Stand, vb. (impf. and partic. stood) I. intr. 1) to be on the feet, in the upright posture between motion and rest; neither to walk or run, nor to sit or kneel or lie: “the fair breeder that is --ing by,” Ven. 282. “how like a jade he stood,” Ven. 282 “poor Wat . . . --s on his hinder legs,” Ven. 282 “thus --s she in a trembling ecstasy,” Ven. 282 Ven. 282 Lucr. 1401. Lucr. 1401 Gent. IV, 4, 35 “(I have stood on the pillory).” V, 4, 129. Wiv. I, 1, 226. Err. III, 1, 68. Err. III, 1, 68 V, 185. Ado III, 3, 110. IV, 1, 70. V, 1, 275. LLL IV, 1, 8. Mids. II, 2, 26 (one aloof s. sentinel; cf. “as I did s. my watch upon the hill,” Mcb. V, 5, 33). Shr. IV, 1, 188. H4B V, 5, 5. H6C I, 1, 84. Mcb. IV, 1, 126. Ant. I, 5, 19 etc. Emphatically: “had Narcissus seen her as she stood,” Lucr. 265 (German: wie sie dastand). “the poor frighted deer that --s at gaze,” Lucr. 265 “why s. you in this strange stare?” Tp. III, 3, 94. “I s. for judgment,” Merch. IV, 1, 103. 142 (cf. below). “how many then should cover that s. bare,” II, 9, 44. “--est thou aloof upon comparison?” H6A V, 4, 150. “s. fair, I pray thee; let me look on thee,” Troil. IV, 5, 235. “I s. in pause where I shall first begin,” Hml. III, 3, 42.
Opposed to verbs of motion: “--ing lakes,” Tp. V, 33. “a --ing pond,” Merch. I, 1, 89. “the --ing pool,” Lr. III, 4, 139. “I am --ing water,” Tp. II, 1, 221 (between ebb and flood). “'tis with him in --ing water, between boy and man,” Tw. I, 5, 168. cf. “the swan's feather, that --s upon the swell at full of tide, and neither way inclines,” Ant. III, 2, 49. “my deadly --ing eye,” Tit. II, 3, 32 (fixed, staring). “never s. 'you had rather',” Wiv. III, 3, 133 (i. e. do not lose time with saying 'you had rather', but look to what you have to do). “s. not to discourse,” Gent. V, 2, 44. “--ing to prate and talk,” Wint. III, 2, 41. “take leave and s. not to reply,” H6C IV, 8, 23. “we will not s. to prate,” R3 I, 3, 351. “s. not to answer: here, take thou the hilts,” Caes. V, 3, 43. “he stood by, whilst I was made a wonder,” H6B II, 4, 45 (and did nothing to prevent it). “grace to s., and virtue go,” Meas. III, 2, 278 (probably == grace in rest, and virtue in action). “s., I say,” Ven. 284 (== stop). Gent. IV, 1, 3. Ado III, 3, 27. Ado III, 3, 27 Ado III, 3, 27 Caes. IV, 2, 1. Cor. V, 2, 1. Hml. I, 1, 14. Cymb. V, 3, 88 etc. “there s., for you are spell-stopped,” Tp. V, 60. “if thou darest s.” Err. V, 31 (i. e. remain here). cf. “which if you seek to prove, I dar not s. by,” Wint. I, 2, 444 (I am resolved to fly). let it (the dish) “s.” Shr. IV, 3, 44 (don't take it away). “s. again,” Troil. IV, 5, 248. “he --s still,” As III, 2, 329. Wint. V, 3, 95. John IV, 1, 77. s. fast, in the same sense: Gent. IV, 1, 1. Caes. V, 1, 22. “darest not s.” Mids. III, 2, 424 (viz to fight with me). “to be valiant is to s.” Rom. I, 1, 12. “if thou darest not s. for ten shillings,” H4A I, 2, 157 (quibbling; see below). s. fast == do your best, do not flinch: John III, 1, 208. H4A II, 2, 75. Troil. II, 3, 273. V, 2, 187. Cor. I, 4, 41 etc. (cf. Fast). “I'll fight with him alone; s., Diomed,” Troil. V, 6, 9 (== forbear; let him alone). “s., Aufidius, and trouble not the peace,” Cor. V, 6, 128.
Opposed to sitting, or kneeling or lying: “--ing, speaking, moving,” Tp. II, 1, 214 (not lying and sleeping). “whiles we stood here securing your repose,” Tp. II, 1, 214 “kneel and repeat it; I will s.” III, 2, 47. “here's a man --s,” All's II, 1, 65. “canst s.” Wint. IV, 3, 78. “that thou shouldst s. while Lewis doth sit,” H6C III, 3, 3. “s., rise and s.” Rom. III, 3, 88. “we will s. and watch your pleasure,” Caes. IV, 3, 249 (== be up). “she stood and spoke,” Ant. V, 2, 344 etc. “s. on end,” Ven. 272. R3 I, 3, 304 etc. (cf. End). “it --s upright,” H6B III, 3, 15. R3 III, 2, 38. Applied, in a quibbling way, to the erected yard: Sonn. 151, 12. Gent. II, 1, 90. Gent. II, 1, 90 II, 5, 23. All's III, 2, 43. Shr. Ind. 2, 127. Rom. I, 1, 34. II, 1, 25. Mcb. II, 3, 38. to s. up, see below.
2) to remain upright, not to fall, not to be lost, not to perish: “to times in hope my verse shall s.” Sonn. 60, 13. “to s. in thy affairs, fall by thy side,” Sonn. 151, 12. “now doth thy honour s . . . as firm as faith,” Wiv. IV, 4, 8. “that it may s. till the perpetual doom,” V, 5, 62. “they shall s. for seed,” Meas. I, 2, 102. “that John may s., then Arthur needs must fall,” John III, 4, 139. if it (this day) must s. still (in the calendar) III, 1, 89. “no conditions of our peace can s.” H4B IV, 1, 184. “our peace shall s. as firm as rocky mountains,” H4B IV, 1, 184 “while England --s,” H6B IV, 10, 45. the cardinal cannot s. under them (your complaints) H8 III, 2, 3. “Troy walls s.” Troil. I, 3, 12. Troy in our weakness --s, not in her strength, 137 (Ff lives). “the commonwealth doth s.” Cor. IV, 6, 14. “it should not s. in thy posterity,” Mcb. III, 1, 4. “that thou mayst s., to enjoy thy banished lord and this great land,” Cymb. II, 1, 69. “when peers thus knit, a kingdom ever --s,” Per. II, 4, 58.
Hence == to be valid: “whose will --s but mine?” H6A I, 3, 11. “shall our condition s.?” V, 4, 165.
3) to be placed in any manner, to have a position or situation: “my heart --s armed in mine ear,” Ven. 779. “the blood which in round drops upon their whiteness stood,” Ven. 779 “twenty consciences that s. 'twixt me and Milan,” Tp. II, 1, 279. “whose heads stood in their breasts,” III, 3, 47. “thy head --s so tickle on thy shoulders,” Meas. I, 2, 176. “two prunes . . . stood, as it were, in a fruit-dish,” II, 1, 94 (Pompey's ideas are associated in a peculiar manner). “in what part of her body --s Ireland?” Err. III, 2, 118. “England stood in her chin,” Err. III, 2, 118 Err. III, 2, 118 it (your nose) “--s too right,” LLL V, 2, 568. “there s. the caskets,” Merch. II, 9, 4. “where . . . --s a sheep-cote,” As IV, 3, 77. “where thy nose --s,” All's II, 3, 268. “my house doth s. by the church,” Tw. III, 1, 7. “if thy tabor s. by the church,” Tw. III, 1, 7 “I will s. betwixt you and danger,” Wint. II, 2, 66. “there --s the castle,” R2 II, 3, 53. “the tomb that --s upon your grandsire's bones,” III, 3, 106. “where old Troy did s.” V, 1, 11. “the burning torch in yonder turret --s,” H6A III, 2, 30. “where castles mounted s.” H6B I, 4, 40. “this staff of honour raught, there let it s. where it best fits to be, in Henry's hand,” II, 3, 43. “his head will s. steadier on a pole,” IV, 7, 101. in the place your father's (head) “--s,” H6C II, 6, 86. “yonder --s the thorny wood,” V, 4, 67. “cold fearful drops s. on my trembling flesh,” R3 V, 3, 181. “how many Grecian tents do s. hollow upon this plain,” Troil. I, 3, 79. “let all untruths s. by thy stained name, and they'll seem glorious,” V, 2, 179. “the high east --s directly here,” Caes. II, 1, 111. seeing those beads of sorrow s. in thine (eyes) III, 1, 284. “--s Scotland where it did?” Mcb. IV, 3, 164. “behold where --s the usurper's cursed head,” V, 8, 54. “where late the diadem stood,” Hml. II, 2, 530. “why one's nose --s i' the middle on's face,” Lr. I, 5, 19. “nature in you --s on the very verge of her confine,” II, 4, 149. “a more unhappy lady, if this division chance, ne'er stood between,” Ant. III, 4, 13. “where yond pine does s.” IV, 12, 1. “your isle, which --s as Neptune's park,” Cymb. III, 1, 18 etc.
4) to be written: “if aught in me worthy perusal s. against thy sight,” Sonn. 38, 6. “whose fine --s in record,” Meas. II, 2, 40. “the strong statutes s. like the forfeits in a barber's shop,” V, 323. “it --s as an edict in destiny,” Mids. I, 1, 151. if it (this day) must s. still (in the calendar) John III, 1, 89. “s. aye accursed in the calendar,” Mcb. IV, 1, 134.
5) to exist; to make one's appearance: “nothing --s but for his scythe to mow,” Sonn. 60, 12. “the blots of nature's hand shall not in their issue s.” Mids. V, 417. “poor trespasses, more monstrous --ing by,” Wint. III, 2, 191. “every man that stood showed like a mine,” H8 I, 1, 21.
6) to be in a state or condition: “how --s the matter with them?” Gent. II, 5, 21. “when it --s well with him, it --s well with her,” Gent. II, 5, 21 “thus --s it with me,” Meas. I, 2, 149. “as the matter now --s,” III, 1, 201. “so --s the comparison,” LLL IV, 1, 80. “you stood as fair as any comer for my affection,” Merch. II, 1, 20 (cf. H4A V, 3, 29). “to s. high in your account,” III, 2, 157. “many fools that s. in better place,” III, 5, 73. “it --s so that I may hardly tarry so long,” Shr. Ind. 2, 127. “thus it --s,” I, 1, 184. “thus it --s with me,” I, 2, 53. “our soldiers s. full fairly for the day,” H4A V, 3, 29 (cf. Merch. II, 1, 20). “the question --eth thus,” H4B I, 3, 15. IV, 1, 53. “as the state stood then,” IV, 1, 53 “the state of Normandy --s on a tickle point,” H6B I, 1, 216. “so it --s,” I, 2, 104. “for my wife, I know not how it --s,” II, 1, 192. “in justice' equal scales, whose beam --s sure,” II, 1, 192 “if Warwick knew in what estate he --s,” H6C IV, 3, 18. “thus --s the case,” IV, 5, 4. “they that s. high,” R3 I, 3, 259. “so stood the state when Henry the Sixth was crowned,” II, 3, 16. II, 3, 16 “s. in authentic place,” Troil. I, 3, 108. “if e'er thou s. at mercy of my sword,” IV, 4, 116. “the Volsces s. but as at first, ready to make road,” Cor. III, 1, 4. “they s. in their ancient strength,” IV, 2, 7. “here --s all your state,” Rom. III, 3, 166. “how --s your disposition to be married?” I, 3, 65. “since the case so --s,” III, 5, 218. “doubtful it stood,” Mcb. I, 2, 7. “nor --s it safe with us, to let his madness range,” Hml. III, 3, 1. “how his audit --s,” Hml. III, 3, 1 “how s. I then, that have a father killed, a mother stained, and let all sleep?” IV, 4, 56. “wherefore should I s. in the plague of custom,” Lr. I, 2, 3. “as the condition of this country --s,” Oth. II, 3, 303. “not to consider in what case thou --est,” Ant. III, 13, 54. “darkling s. the varying shore o' the world,” IV, 15, 10. “how the case --s with her,” Cymb. I, 5, 67. “Tyrus --s in a litigious peace,” Per. III, 3, 2 etc.
Hence almost equivalent to the auxiliary verb to be; with participles: “the truest issue of thy throne by his own interdiction --s accursed,” Mcb. IV, 3, 107 (cf. IV, 1, 134). “how s. you affected to his wish?” Gent. I, 3, 60. II, 1, 90. R3 III, 1, 171. “it --s agreed,” H8 V, 3, 87. “s. not amazed,” Wiv. V, 5, 244. “why s. these royal fronts amazed thus?” John II, 356. “s. you so assured,” Shr. I, 2, 156. “--est not thou attainted,” H6A II, 4, 92. “his soul shall s. sore charged,” H5 I, 2, 283. “s. I condemned for pride so much,” Ado III, 1, 108. R2 II, 2, 132. II, 3, 119. Troil. III, 3, 219. Lr. I, 4, 5. “thou shalt s. cursed,” John III, 1, 173. “more than I s. debted to this gentleman,” Err. IV, 1, 31. “through the length of times he --s disgraced,” Lucr. 718. Lucr. 718 “I s. dishonoured,” Ado IV, 1, 65. “I stood engaged,” All's V, 3, 96. Troil. V, 3, 68. “s. excommunicate,” John III, 1, 223. “s. excused,” IV, 3, 51. R3 I, 2, 86. “s. indebted to you,” Merch. IV, 1, 413. “how s. you minded,” H8 III, 1, 58. “if her fortunes ever stood necessitied to help,” All's V, 3, 84. “so --s this squire officed with me,” Wint. I, 2, 171. “whereby we s. opposed,” H4A V, 1, 67. “whereof our uncle did s. possessed,” R2 II, 1, 162. R3 III, 1, 196. “so you s. pleased withal,” Merch. III, 2, 211. “s. resolved,” Tit. I, 135. “lands which he stood seized of,” Hml. I, 1, 89. “things --ing thus unknown,” V, 2, 356. “and s. unshaken yours,” H8 III, 2, 199.
With adjectives: “I s. accountant for as great a sin,” Oth. II, 1, 302. “they would s. auspicious to the hour,” Lucr. 347. Wint. IV, 4, 52. “--s chief in power,” All's II, 1, 115. “the fold --s empty,” Mids. II, 1, 96. H8 V, 3, 10. “ancestors who stood equivalent with mighty kings,” Per. V, 1, 92. “s. forfeit,” LLL V, 2, 427. “the gods today s. friendly,” Caes. V, 1, 94. “s. gracious to the rites,” Tit. I, 78. “he --s obdurate,” Merch. IV, 1, 8. of many “mine being one may s. in number, though in reckoning none,” Rom. I, 2, 33 (cf. Meas. II, 4, 58). “he should s. one of the three to share it,” Caes. IV, 1, 14. “how loathly opposite I stood,” Lr. II, 1, 51. “but all alone --s hugely politic,” Sonn. 124, 11. “that the comparison may s. more proper,” Merch. III, 2, 46.
With substantives: “s. my friend,” H4B III, 2, 235. H4B III, 2, 235 H8 IV, 2, 157. “s. good father to me now,” Shr. IV, 4, 21. “where each second stood heir to the first,” Oth. I, 1, 38. “s. my good lord,” H4B IV, 3, 89. “--ing your friendly lord,” Cor. II, 3, 198. “to s. auspicious mistress,” Lr. II, 1, 42.
With adverbs or prepositional expressions: “the Cyprus wars, which even now s. in act,” Oth. I, 1, 152. “though our proper son stood in your action,” I, 3, 70. “s. under the adoption of abominable terms,” Wiv. II, 2, 308. “the people do s. but in a forced affection,” Caes. IV, 3, 205. “regards that s. aloof from the entire point,” Lr. I, 1, 242. “he that breaks them --s in attainder of eternal shame,” LLL I, 1, 158. “s. at my bestowing,” All's II, 3, 59. “his integrity --s without blemish,” Meas. V, 108. “what case s. I in?” Wint. I, 2, 352. on what condition --s it (my fault) “and wherein?” R2 II, 3, 107. “a true soul when most impeached --s least in thy control,” Sonn. 125, 14. “s. in hard cure,” Lr. III, 6, 107. “my hopes s. in bold cure,” Oth. II, 1, 51. “you s. within his danger,” Merch. IV, 1, 180. “s. in your own defence,” LLL V, 2, 85. “nice affections wavering stood in doubt,” Compl. 97. “to be worst, --s still in esperance,” Lr. IV, 1, 4. “you s. in coldest expectation,” H4B V, 2, 31. “our preparation --s in expectation of them,” Lr. IV, 4, 22. “if it s. within the eye of honour,” Merch. I, 1, 136. “as we s. in fear,” Meas. II, 3, 34. H6B IV, 2, 66. “I s. on fire: come to the matter,” Cymb. V, 5, 168. “the doom --s in effectual force,” Gent. III, 1, 223. LLL I, 1, 11. “my woeful self, that did in freedom s.” Compl. 143. “'tis best we s. upon our guard,” Tp. II, 1, 321. “--s at a guard with envy,” Meas. I, 3, 51. “in the great hand of God I s.” Mcb. II, 3, 136. “one would speak to her and s. in hope of answer,” Wint. V, 2, 110. Tit. II, 1, 119. “which else would s. under grievous imposition,” Meas. I, 2, 194. “my life --s in the level of your dreams,” Wint. III, 2, 82. “such as s. not in their liking,” Cor. I, 1, 199. “s. in assured loss,” Lr. III, 6, 102. “many lives s. between me and home,” H6C III, 2, 173. “a note of what I s. in need of,” Gent. II, 7, 84. “what dangerous action, stood it next to death,” V, 4, 41. “freely have they leave to s. on either part,” All's I, 2, 15. “in which predicament thou --est,” Merch. IV, 1, 357. “to be king --s not within the prospect of belief,” Mcb. I, 3, 74. “not being the worst --s in some rank of praise,” Lr. II, 4, 261. “s. in readiness,” Tit. I, 325. “whose fine --s in record,” Meas. II, 2, 40 (cf. sub 4). “to both it --s in like request,” Cor. III, 2, 51. “if thou --est not in the state of hanging,” V, 2, 70. “the help of one --s me in little stead,” H6A IV, 6, 31. “have I lived to s. at the taunt of one,” Wiv. V, 5, 151. “but O, the thorns we s. upon,” Wint. IV, 4, 596. “none --s under more calumnious tongues,” H8 V, 1, 113. Cor. IV, 2, 7.
7) Followed by prepositions; a) to s. against == to oppose; to offer resistance: “devices . . . which shall then have no power to s. against us,” Meas. IV, 4, 16. “s. against us like an enemy,” H4A IV, 3, 37. H4B IV, 4, 95. “manhood is called foolery, when it --s against a falling fabric,” Cor. III, 1, 246. Caes. III, 2, 124. Lr. II, 1, 70. IV, 7, 33.
b) to s. by == to maintain, to support, to assist: “will you s. by us?” H6C IV, 1, 145. “to s. firm by honour,” Troil. II, 2, 68. “s. by our Ajax,” IV, 5, 89 (as his second).
c) to s. for == 1) to be for, to side with, to support, to fight for: “I s. wholly for you,” Wiv. III, 2, 62. I will s. for it (virginity) “a little,” All's I, 1, 145. “s. for your own,” H5 I, 2, 101. “I'll s. to-day for thee and me and Troy,” Troil. V, 3, 36. “that hath thus stood for his country,” Cor. II, 2, 45. “when Marcius stood for Rome,” IV, 6, 45. “--est so for Posthumus,” Cymb. III, 5, 56. cf. Merch. IV, 1, 103. Merch. IV, 1, 103 Wint. III, 2, 46. 2) to be in the place of, to represent: “for Achilles' image stood his spear,” Lucr. 1424. “a face, a leg, a head, stood for the whole,” Lucr. 1424 “craft, being richer than innocency, --s for the facing,” Meas. III, 2, 11. “I am to s. for him,” LLL V, 2, 508. “I s. for sacrifice,” Merch. III, 2, 57. “thanks which . . . --s for my bounty,” R2 II, 3, 67. “if thou darest not s. for ten shillings,” H4A I, 2, 157 (quibbling). “do thou s. for my father,” II, 4, 413. II, 4, 413 “I s. here for him,” H5 II, 4, 116. “there --s your friend for the devil,” III, 7, 128. “my will shall s. for law,” H6C IV, 1, 50. “the commoners, for whom we s.” Cor. II, 1, 243. “the people of Rome, for whom we s. a special party,” Tit. I, 20. “must thou needs s. for a villain in thine own work?” Tim. V, 1, 39. “do thou for him s.” Lr. I, 4, 157. “this borrowed passion --s for true old woe,” Per. IV, 4, 24. (cf. “s. thou as Dauphin in my place,” H6A I, 2, 61). 3) to be as good as; to be reckoned: “a woman's nay doth s. for nought,” Pilgr. 340. “I hope this reason --s for my excuse,” Shr. Ind. 2, 126. cf. “our compelled sins s. more for number than for accompt,” Meas. II, 4, 58 (compare Rom. I, 2, 33). 4) to offer one's self as a candidate (in the fashion of ancient Rome): “when he shall s. for his place,” Cor. II, 1, 165. “were he to s. for consul,” Cor. II, 1, 165 II, 2, 2. II, 3, 195. V, 6, 28.
d) to s. in == to insist on; lection of O. Edd. in Tit. IV, 4, 105: if she s. in hostage for his safety. M. Edd. s. on hostage; but cf. R2 II, 3, 107.
e) to s. on == 1) to insist on: “if that thy valour s. on sympathy,” R2 IV, 33. “and then s. upon security,” H4B I, 2, 42. “when articles too nicely urged be stood on,” H5 V, 2, 94. “and s. upon my common part,” Cor. I, 9, 39. “do not s. upon it,” II, 2, 154. 2) to make much of, to attach a high value to: “in these times you s. on distance,” Wiv. II, 1, 233. “you s. upon your honour!” II, 2, 20. “this fellow doth not s. upon points,” Mids. V, 118. “we s. upon our manners,” Wint. IV, 4, 164. “let him that is a true-born gentleman and --s upon the honour of his birth,” H6A II, 4, 28. “do not s. on quillets how to slay him,” H6B III, 1, 261. “wherefore s. you on nice points,” H6C IV, 7, 58. “your franchises, whereon you stood,” Cor. IV, 6, 86. “you that stood so much upon the voice of occupation,” Cor. IV, 6, 86 “this minion stood upon her chastity,” Tit. II, 3, 124. “who s. so much on the new form,” Rom. II, 4, 35. “I never stood on ceremonies,” Caes. II, 2, 13. “s. not upon the order of your going,” Mcb. III, 4, 119. “to s. on more mechanic compliment,” Ant. IV, 4, 31. 3) to depend on (to rely on as well as to be in a state of dependance from): “--s so firmly on his wife's frailty,” Wiv. II, 1, 242. “the good I s. on is my truth and honesty,” H8 V, 1, 123. “it stood upon the choice of friends,” Mids. I, 1, 139. “your fortune stood upon the casket there,” Merch. III, 2, 203. “upon whose influence Neptune's empire --s,” Hml. I, 1, 119. 4) to concern, to be of importance to: “consider how it --s upon my credit,” Err. IV, 1, 68. “my state --s on me to defend, not to debate,” Lr. V, 1, 69. The preposition transposed: “it --s your grace upon to do him right,” R2 II, 3, 138 (== it is your office, your duty). “it --s me much upon to stop all hopes,” R3 IV, 2, 59. “does it not s. me now upon, . . . is't not perfect conscience, to quit him with this arm?” Hml. V, 2, 63. “it only --s our lives upon to use our strongest hands,” Ant. II, 1, 50. 5) to have to do with; to concern one's self about: “--s on tricks when I am indisposed,” Err. I, 2, 80. “I s. on sudden haste,” Rom. II, 3, 93. “'tis but the time and drawing days out that men s. upon,” Caes. III, 1, 100. 6) to be on: “what terms the enemy stood on,” H5 III, 6, 78 (== what were the terms of the enemy; cf. Term). “the sore terms we s. upon with the gods,” Per. IV, 2, 38. “to determine of what conditions we shall s. upon,” H4B IV, 1, 165 (== what shall be our conditions). “the main descry --s on the hourly thought,” Lr. IV, 6, 218 (== is to be expected every hour).
f) to s. to == 1) to side with, to assist, to support; to maintain, to guard, to be firm in the cause of: “s. to me,” H4B II, 1, 70. “call them pillars that will s. to us,” H6C II, 3, 51. “s. to me in this cause,” Cor. V, 3, 199. “who ever yet have stood to charity, and displayed the effects of disposition gentle,” H8 II, 4, 86. “or let us s. to our authority, or let us lose it,” Cor. III, 1, 208. 2) to abide by, to persist in: “s. fast, good Fate, to his hanging,” Tp. I, 1, 32. “now I'll s. to't, the pancakes were naught,” As I, 2, 69. “Sir John --s to his word,” H4A I, 2, 130. “and yet you will s. to it; you will not pocket up wrong,” III, 3, 183. “will speak more in a minute than he will s. to in a month,” Rom. II, 4, 157. “to this point I s. . . . that both the worlds I give to negligence, . . . only I'll be revenged,” Hml. IV, 5, 133. 3) to go through, to maintain one's ground in: “Troilus will s. to the proof,” Troil. I, 2, 142 (== stand the test). to s. to it == to be brave and stout-hearted; not to flinch; to do one's best: “an thy mind s. to it, boy, steal away bravely,” All's II, 1, 29. “the danger is in --ing to it,” III, 2, 43 (quibbling). “is't a lusty yeoman? will a s. to't?” H4B II, 1, 5. “we stood to't in good time,” Cor. IV, 6, 10. “'tis he. S. to it,” Mcb. III, 3, 15.
g) to s. with == 1) to join, to make common cause with: “I think he will s. very strong with us,” Caes. II, 1, 142. “then s. with us,” Mcb. III, 3, 4. 2) to agree; to be consistent with: “your good will may s. with ours, this day to be conjoined,” Ado V, 4, 29. “if it s. with honesty,” As II, 4, 91. “such assurance ta'en as shall with either part's agreement s.” Shr. IV, 4, 50. “if with thy will it --s,” H6C II, 3, 38. “if it may s. with the tune of your voices that I may be consul,” Cor. II, 3, 91.
8) with adverbs; a) to s. off, == 1) to keep at a distance: “our bloods . . . s. off in differences so mighty,” All's II, 3, 127. “s. no more off,” IV, 2, 34. 2) to have relief, to appear prominent: “the truth of it --s off as gross as black and white,” H5 II, 2, 103.
b) to s. out == 1) not to take part, to keep off: “repaying what we took from them, . . . only myself stood out,” Tw. III, 3, 35. “what, art thou stiff? --est out?” Cor. I, 1, 245. 2) to be in arms, to rebel: “you have of late stood out against your brother,” Ado I, 3, 22. “his spirit is come in, that so stood out against the church,” John V, 2, 71. “the rebels which s. out in Ireland,” R2 I, 4, 38.
c) to s. to == to fall to work: “I will s. to and feed,” Tp. III, 3, 49. “makes him s. to and not s. to,” Mcb. II, 3, 38 (cf. All's II, 1, 29).
d) to s. up == 1) to be on the feet, to remain upright: “that which here --s up is but a quintain,” As I, 2, 262. “s. close up,” H8 V, 4, 92. “who sensibly outdares his senseless sword, and, when it bows, --s up,” Cor. I, 4, 54. “how stiff is my vile sense, that I s. up,” Lr. IV, 6, 287. “I have an absolute hope our landmen will s. up,” Ant. IV, 3, 11. “whilst he stood up and spoke,” V, 1, 7. 2) to ascend a higher place: “shall we s. up here and see them?” Troil. I, 2, 193. 3) to rise: Meas. V, 460. Mids. IV, 1, 146. Merch. II, 2, 86. All's II, 1, 64. All's II, 1, 64 R2 V, 3, 111. H6A III, 4, 25. H8 V, 1, 114. Cor. III, 2, 12. V, 3, 52. Tit. I, 485. Rom. III, 3, 75. Rom. III, 3, 75 IV, 2, 28 etc. In a moral sense, == to rise in arms; to fight; to rebel: “he that tempered thee bade thee s. up, gave thee no instance why thou shouldst do treason,” H5 II, 2, 118. “we stood up about the corn,” Cor. II, 3, 16. “we all s. up against the spirit of Caesar,” Caes. II, 1, 167. “gods, s. up for bastards,” Lr. I, 2, 22. “a peasant s. up thus!” III, 7, 80. “were't not that we s. up against them all,” Ant. II, 1, 44. == to rise in order to make a declaration or put in a claim: “nature might s. up and say to all the world,” Caes. V, 5, 74. “the which immediacy may well s. up and call itself your brother,” Lr. V, 3, 65. “to weet we s. up peerless,” Ant. I, 1, 40. “--s up for the main soldier,” I, 2, 197. “where was he that could s. up his parallel?” Cymb. V, 4, 54.
e) As with up, similarly with many other adverbs it receives the sense of motion, or rather of a state caused by previous motion, and becomes equivalent to to step, to go, to come: “how coldly those impediments s. forth of wealth, of filial fear,” Compl. 269. “that my accusers . . . may s. forth face to face,” H8 V, 3, 47. Mostly in the imperative: “s. all aloof,” Merch. III, 2, 42. “s. apart,” Err. V, 364. R2 III, 3, 187. “s. aside,” Gent. IV, 2, 81. Ado IV, 2, 32. LLL IV, 1, 55. As III, 2, 132. H6C III, 3, 110. “s. away,” H5 IV, 8, 14. All's V, 2, 17. “s. back,” Shr. II, 341. John IV, 3, 81. H6A I, 2, 70. I, 3, 33. I, 3, 33 R3 I, 2, 38. Caes. III, 2, 172. “s. by,” Ado IV, 1, 24. Shr. I, 2, 143. John IV, 3, 94 (== step aside, withdraw). H6B II, 1, 72 (== approach, come up). Ant. III, 11, 41. “s. forth,” Mids. I, 1, 24. III, 1, 83. Merch. IV, 1, 175. R2 IV, 7. H8 I, 2, 129. “s. off,” Tp. III, 2, 92. Tp. III, 2, 92 Caes. III, 2, 171. In the same manner with the prepos. from: “s. from him,” H4B II, 1, 74. IV, 4, 116. “s. from the hearse,” Caes. III, 2, 169.
II. trans. 1) to resist: “an she s. him but a little, he will throw a figure in her face,” Shr. I, 2, 113. “none durst s. him,” H6A I, 1, 123. “a great sea-mark --ing every flaw,” Cor. V, 3, 74. “the lust-dieted man, that --s your ordinance,” Lr. IV, 1, 71 (Ff slaves). “the villain would not s. me,” Cymb. I, 2, 15. “who dares not s. his foe,” V, 3, 60.
2) to go through, to abide, to sustain: “thou hast strangely stood the test,” Tp. IV, 7. “and s. the push of every vain comparative,” H4A III, 2, 66. H4B II, 2, 40. Troil. II, 2, 137. “I will s. the hazard of the die,” R3 V, 4, 10. Tim. V, 2, 5. “if this poor trash of Venice s. the putting on,” Oth. II, 1, 313. “I must s. the course,” Lr. III, 7, 54. “his love, which --s an honourable trial,” Ant. I, 3, 74. “to s. the buffet with knaves,” I, 4, 20.
3) With an accus. of time: “you have stood your limitation,” Cor. II, 3, 146 (your limited or prescribed time). “as I did s. my watch,” Mcb. V, 5, 33 (cf. “s. sentinel,” Mids. II, 2, 26).
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