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Stay, vb. 1) intr. a) to stand: “so o'er this sleeping soul doth Tarquin s.” Lucr. 423. who --s it (time) “still withal?” As III, 2, 348. “I'll s. above the hill,” H6C III, 1, 5. to s. on == to stand on, to insist on: “I s. here on my bond,” Merch. IV, 1, 242. to s. == to make a stand, not to flee: “give them leave to fly that will not s.” H6C II, 3, 50. “not that I fear to s.” II, 5, 138. “an he had --ed by him,” Cor. II, 1, 143 (== opposed him). “s. by me, my lords,” H6C I, 1, 31 (== assist me). “s. thou by thy lord,” Caes. V, 5, 44. “you --ed well by't in Egypt,” Ant. II, 2, 179 (== you have stood your ground).
b) to stand still, to stop: “each shadow makes him stop, each murmur s.” Ven. 706. “to make her s.” Ven. 706 “there she --ed,” Lucr. 1275 (stopped, paused). “in pursuit of the thing she would have s.” Sonn. 143, 4. “and never --s to greet him,” As II, 1, 54. “the glorious sun --s in his course,” John III, 1, 78. “s. and breathe awhile,” H4A V, 4, 47. Oftenest in the imperative: Wiv. V, 5, 84. Meas. V, 354. Err. V, 364. Mids. II, 2, 84. Mids. II, 2, 84 V, 281. H4A II, 2, 85 (Qq stand). H6A III, 1, 103. H6C IV, 3, 27. R3 I, 2, 33. Cor. V, 2, 1. Rom. IV, 3, 57. Hml. I, 1, 51. 127 etc. etc.
Hence == to cease, to have an end: “here my commission --s,” H6B II, 4, 76.
c) to be in a place: “when . . . thy shade . . . on sightless eyes doth s.” Sonn. 43, 12. “I would be brought where thou dost s.” 44, 4. “tell him where I s.” Meas. IV, 5, 7. “and s. here in your court for three years,” LLL I, 1, 52. “how long within this wood intend you s.?” Mids. II, 1, 138. “the chamber where we --ed,” H4B IV, 5, 57. “if he s. in France,” H5 II, 4, 139. Distinguished from to abide: they cherish it (virtue) “to make it s. there, and yet it will no more but abide,” Wint. IV, 3, 98 (the clown's speech).
d) to continue in a place or state, to remain: “she --s, exclaiming on the direful night,” Lucr. 741. “the stain upon his silver down will s.” Lucr. 741 “that to my use it might unused s. from hands of falsehood,” Sonn. 48, 3. “then s. at home and go not,” Gent. II, 7, 62. “s. with me awhile,” III, 1, 58. III, 1, 58 IV, 1, 21. Wiv. I, 4, 40. III, 5, 59. Meas. II, 2, 26. Err. I, 2, 10. IV, 1, 86. IV, 4, 155. V, 336. LLL I, 1, 111. Mids. II, 1, 145. Tw. I, 3, 119. Wint. I, 2, 15. R2 I, 2, 57. H6A IV, 5, 20. H6A IV, 5, 20 H6C III, 2, 58. Cor. II, 3, 45 “(we are not to s. all together).” Tim. IV, 3, 47 (s. thou out for earnest, == remain without) etc. etc. to s. behind == not to join a person or an enterprise: John III, 3, 1. V, 7, 70. R3 II, 2, 154. Lr. III, 6, 108. Ant. III, 7, 20. not to s. behind a person or an enterprise: As I, 1, 115. All's II, 1, 24. Tw. III, 3, 4. Troil. I, 1, 83. Cor. I, 1, 247.
e) to delay, to tarry, to be long: “thou --est too long,” Pilgr. 168. “thou hast --ed so long that going will scarce serve the turn,” Gent. III, 1, 388. “--est thou to vex me here?” IV, 4, 66. “we s. too long,” Wiv. IV, 1, 87. “no longer --ing but to give the mother notice,” Meas. I, 4, 86. “I s. too long from her,” Shr. III, 2, 112. Err. III, 2, 173. Err. IV, 1, 33. Err. IV, 1, 33 V, 20. H6B III, 1, 94. IV, 8, 62 etc. “s. not to expostulate,” H6C II, 5, 135 (lose no time with expostulating; cf. Stand). “s. not to talk with them,” Tit. II, 3, 306. Cor. IV, 2, 43. Rom. V, 3, 158. cf. H6B II, 4, 86.
f) to wait: “but, like a sad slave, s. and think of nought,” Sonn. 57, 11. “s.: not yet,” Tp. I, 2, 36. “dinner is ready, and your father --s,” Gent. I, 2, 131. III, 1, 53. Wiv. IV, 5, 13. Meas. II, 3, 17. Err. III, 1, 36. LLL V, 2, 845. Merch. V, 302. H4A II, 4, 63. IV, 3, 29. H6B IV, 10, 7. H6C IV, 1, 5 etc. With for: not --ing for the people's suffrages, Lucr. Arg. H6C IV, 1, 5 “you are --ed for,” Gent. II, 2, 19. III, 1, 382. III, 1, 382 Wiv. I, 1, 213. Wiv. I, 1, 213 IV, 6, 49. Err. I, 2, 76. III, 2, 189. IV, 1, 91. Mids. I, 1, 168. Merch. II, 6, 48. III, 4, 82. John II, 44. R2 I, 3, 5. Tim. I, 1, 179 etc.
With on, == 1) to attend on, to wait on: “I thank you, and will s. upon your leisure,” All's III, 5, 48. “thine eye hath --ed upon some favour that it loves,” Tw. II, 4, 24. “my house and welcome on their pleasure s.” Rom. I, 2, 37. “worthy Macbeth, we s. upon your leisure,” Mcb. I, 3, 148. they (the players) “s. upon your patience,” Hml. III, 2, 112. “he --s upon your will,” Ant. I, 2, 119. 2) to wait for: “I have a servant comes with me along, that --s upon me,” Meas. IV, 1, 47. “our throats are sentenced and s. upon execution,” Cor. V, 4, 8. cf. Err. V, 20.
2) trans. a) to help to stand upright, to keep from falling, to support, to prop: “makes nice of no vile hold to s. him up,” John III, 4, 138. “struck me, that thought to s. him, overboard,” R3 I, 4, 19. “two props . . . to s. him from the fall of vanity,” III, 7, 97.
b) to make to stand, to keep from proceeding on its way, to stop: “a river --ed swelleth with more rage,” Ven. 331. “all these poor forbiddings could not s. him,” Lucr. 323. “she her plaints a little while doth s.” Lucr. 323 “if you meet the prince, you may s. him,” Ado III, 3, 81. Ado III, 3, 81 Ado III, 3, 81 IV, 1, 285. Wint. II, 3, 110. H6A I, 5, 2. Rom. V, 2, 12.
c) to keep back; to restrain: “he was --ed by thee,” Lucr. 917. “your ships are --ed at Venice,” Shr. IV, 2, 83. “s. your thanks awhile,” Wint. I, 2, 9. “s. thy revengeful hand,” R2 V, 3, 42. H6A I, 2, 104. “s. my thoughts, that labour to persuade my soul,” H6B III, 2, 136. III, 1, 105. Caes. IV, 3, 127. Hml. IV, 5, 136. With from: “to s. you from election,” Merch. III, 2, 24. “you might s. him from his intendment,” As I, 1, 139. “how my men will s. themselves from laughter,” Shr. Ind. 1, 134. III, 2, 23. H4B IV, 1, 123.
d) to cease, to finish: “the goose came out of door, and --ed the odds by adding four,” LLL III, 93. LLL III, 93 “retreat is made and execution --ed,” H4B IV, 3, 78. “O that my death would s. these ruthful deeds,” H6C II, 5, 95. “s. your strife,” Tit. III, 1, 193.
e) to put off, to retard: “to s. him not too long, I am content . . . to have him matched,” Shr. IV, 4, 30. “did entreat his holiness to s. the judgement o' the divorce,” H8 III, 2, 33. “we do our longing s. to hear the rest untold,” Per. V, 3, 83.
f) to make to remain, to detain: “that tide will s. me longer than I should,” Gent. II, 2, 15. “--s me here at home unkept,” As I, 1, 8. if they (anchors) “can but s. you where you'll be loath to be,” Wint. IV, 4, 582. “my heart hath one poor string to s. it by,” John V, 7, 55. H8 I, 1, 5. Tit. II, 3, 181. Rom. V, 3, 187. Caes. II, 2, 75. == to suffer to remain: “we --ed her for your sake,” As I, 3, 69.
g) to wait for: “flesh --s no farther reason,” Sonn. 151, 8. “my father --s my coming,” Gent. II, 2, 13. “we must s. the time,” Mids. V, 259. “s. the very riping of the time,” Merch. II, 8, 40. “let me s. the growth of his beard,” As III, 2, 221. R2 I, 3, 4. Troil. I, 1, 25. Rom. II, 5, 36. Mcb. IV, 3, 142. Hml. V, 2, 24. Oth. IV, 2, 170. Ant. III, 13, 155. “to s. one's leisure:” Sonn. 58, 4. Shr. III, 2, 219. IV, 3, 59. John II, 58. H4A I, 3, 258.
h) to remain for the purpose of: “I cannot s. thanks-giving,” LLL II, 193 (== I have no time for thanking you). “s. not thy compliment,” IV, 2, 147 (== lose no time with thy courtesy, but go). “I s. dinner there,” R3 III, 2, 122. Rom. IV, 5, 150. to s. question (German: Rede stehen): “I will not s. thy questions,” Mids. II, 1, 235. “I'll s. no longer question,” Merch. IV, 1, 346. “--ing no longer question,” H4B I, 1, 48.
i) to abide, to undergo, to meet, to stand: “they basely fly and dare not s. the field,” Ven. 894. “she will not s. the siege of loving terms,” Rom. I, 1, 218. “arming myself with patience to s. the providence of some high powers,” Caes. V, 1, 107.
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