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Stir, vb. 1) trans. a) to disturb: “my mind is troubled, like a fountain --ed,” Troil. III, 3, 311. “a bubbling fountain --ed with wind,” Tit. II, 4, 23. “s. no embers up,” Ant. II, 2, 13.
b) to move: “they are heavier than all thy woes can s.” Wint. III, 2, 210. “he would not s. his pettitoes,” IV, 4, 619. “or s. thy foot,” John IV, 3, 96. “dares s. a wing,” H6C I, 1, 47. “we may as well push against Powle's as s. 'em,” H8 V, 4, 16.
c) to awaken: “let none of your people s. me,” Mids. IV, 1, 43. “'tis time to s. him from his trance,” Shr. I, 1, 182. “you ever have wished the sleeping of this business; never desired it to be --ed,” H8 II, 4, 164.
d) to excite, to raise: “this flower's force in --ing love,” Mids. II, 2, 69. “--s good thoughts in any breast,” John II, 112. “to s. a mutiny in the mildest thoughts,” Tit. IV, 1, 85. With up: “careless lust --s up a desperate courage,” Ven. 556. “I will s. up in England some black storm,” H6B III, 1, 349. “the thoughts of them would have --ed up remorse,” H6C V, 5, 64.
e) to excite, to move, to rouse, to agitate: “never could the strumpet . . . once s. my temper,” Meas. II, 2, 185. “so shall we pass along and never s. assailants,” As I, 3, 116. “I am sorry I have thus far --ed you,” Wint. V, 3, 74. “he was --ed with such an agony,” H8 II, 1, 32. “'twill s. him strongly,” III, 2, 218. “Antony will be himself. But --ed by Cleopatra,” Ant. I, 1, 43. “I could not s. him,” Cymb. IV, 2, 38. With up: “s. Demetrius up with bitter wrong,” Mids. III, 2, 361. whose worthiness would s. it up (the king's virtue) All's I, 1, 10. “--ing my subjects up,” H6C V, 5, 15. “you do yourselves but wrong to s. me up,” Tim. III, 4, 53. “the senate hath --ed up the confiners,” Cymb. IV, 2, 337. lest you s. up mine (impatience) V, 4, 112. “men must s. you up,” Per. IV, 2, 98. Per. IV, 2, 98
f) to incite, to impel, to instigate; “--ed by a painted beauty to his verse,” Sonn. 21, 2. As I, 1, 170. John II, 63. John II, 63 R3 I, 3, 331. H8 III, 2, 418. Caes. III, 2, 126. Hml. V, 2, 256. Lr. II, 4, 277. With “on:” LLL V, 2, 695. Tw. III, 2, 63. With “up:” Mids. I, 1, 12. John II, 55. R2 IV, 133. H6B III, 1, 163. H6C IV, 8, 12. R3 IV, 4, 468. Caes. II, 1, 176. III, 2, 214. Hml. IV, 7, 9.
2) intr. a) to move one's self: “he starts at --ing of a feather,” Ven. 302. “s. not!” Ado III, 3, 103. As IV, 3, 117. Wint. V, 3, 98. John IV, 1, 81. H4A III, 2, 46. H4B IV, 5, 32. H6B II, 4, 18. R3 I, 4, 164. Troil. III, 3, 184. Rom. V, 3, 147. Caes. V, 1, 26. Mcb. V, 5, 12. Hml. I, 1, 10. IV, 1, 9. Lr. I, 1, 128. V, 3, 265. Oth. II, 3, 173. Oth. II, 3, 173 IV, 1, 56. V, 2, 95.
b) to change place; to go or be carried in any manner: “if I did not think it had been Anne Page, would I might never s.” Wiv. V, 5, 199 (Slender's speech. cf. John I, 145). “s. not you till you have well determined on these slanderers,” Meas. V, 258 (== do not go away). “I will not let him s. till I have used the approved means,” Err. V, 102. “I will determine this before I s.” Err. V, 102 Mids. III, 1, 125. Wint. V, 3, 101. Wint. V, 3, 101 John I, 145. John I, 145 H6A I, 4, 55. H6C I, 1, 100. V, 1, 96. Rom. I, 1, 11. Rom. I, 1, 11 Caes. II, 2, 9. Caes. II, 2, 9 Hml. I, 1, 161 (Qq dares s., Ff can walk). Lr. I, 2, 186. Oth. III, 1, 30 (if she will s. hither; quibbling). V, 1, 107 (Qq an you s., Ff if you stare). “look how thou --est now!” Per. II, 1, 16 (== how awkward you are!). “how thou --est, thou block,” III, 2, 90.
c) to be in motion; to be enlivened: “now in the --ing passage of the day,” Err. III, 1, 99. “a merry, nimble, --ing spirit,” LLL V, 2, 16. “the blood more --s to rouse a lion,” H4A I, 3, 197. “now is the mad blood --ing,” Rom. III, 1, 4.
d) to be roused, to be excited: “the wrongs I have done thee s. afresh within me,” Wint. V, 1, 148. “that for which the people s.” Cor. III, 1, 53. With against: “to s. against the butchers of his life,” R2 I, 2, 3. “a man that more detests, more --s against defacers of a public peace,” H8 V, 3, 39. With at: (blood) “unapt to s. at these indignities,” H4A I, 3, 2. “nor s. at nothing till the axe of death hang over thee,” H6B II, 4, 49.
e) to be active; to be busy: “be --ing as the time,” John V, 1, 48. “Mortimer doth s. about his title,” H4A II, 3, 84. “s. not to-night,” IV, 3, 5. “all hell shall s. for this,” H5 V, 1, 72. “a --ing dwarf we do allowance give before a sleeping giant,” Troil. II, 3, 146. Cor. I, 3, 13. IV, 5, 233. Rom. IV, 2, 39. IV, 4, 3. Hml. I, 5, 34. IV, 4, 54. Ant. II, 1, 36.
f) to be on foot; to exist: “no ill luck --ing but what lights on my shoulders,” Merch. III, 1, 99. “what wisdom --s amongst you?” Wint. II, 1, 21. “there's no equity --ing,” H4A II, 2, 106. “I will keep where there is wit --ing,” Troil. II, 1, 130.
g) to be already out of bed in the morning; to be up: “myself was --ing ere the break of day,” Lucr. 1280. “you are early --ing,” R3 III, 2, 36. “s. with the lark tomorrow,” V, 3, 56. Troil. I, 2, 52. Caes. II, 2, 110 “(are you --ed).” Mcb. II, 3, 47. Mcb. II, 3, 47 Oth. III, 1, 27. Oth. III, 1, 27 Per. III, 2, 12.
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