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Save, vb. 1) to preserve, to rescue, to release, to guard: Wiv. II, 3, 6. Meas. II, 1, 7. II, 4, 64. II, 4, 64 II, 4, 64 III, 1, 62. III, 1, 62 III, 1, 62 III, 1, 62 V, 396. V, 396 Err. I, 1, 114. V, 168. V, 168 V, 168 Ado II, 1, 155. All's II, 1, 181. Wint. II, 3, 161. John IV, 1, 73. H6A I, 2, 147. III, 2, 105. IV, 3, 26. Cor. V, 3, 75. Hml. III, 4, 103. Cymb. II, 4, 94 etc. With from: “to s. your ship from wreck,” Gent. I, 1, 156. IV, 4, 3. Meas. II, 2, 161. IV, 3, 89. Wint. IV, 4, 521. H6A V, 4, 160. H6B II, 1, 143. Tit. II, 3, 164. Hml. IV, 7, 146. Lr. V, 3, 191 etc. God s. == God may preserve or guard: Meas. II, 2, 25. Ado III, 2, 82. V, 1, 327. LLL IV, 2, 149. V, 2, 310. As V, 2, 20. Shr. I, 2, 219. R2 II, 2, 41. H6A IV, 1, 2. R3 III, 7, 22. H8 II, 1, 1 etc. (As for God s. the mark, see Mark). God omitted: “s his majesty,” Tp. II, 1, 168 (M. Edd. God s. his majesty). “s. our graces,” III, 2, 115. Particularly as a kind wish in meeting or parting: “Sir Proteus, s. you,” Gent. I, 1, 70. “s. your honour,” Meas. II, 2, 161. Wiv. II, 3, 19. III, 1, 41. All's I, 1, 117. III, 2, 47. Tw. III, 1, 1. Tw. III, 1, 1 Tim. IV, 3, 414. Lr. II, 1, 1 etc. s. your reverence, in the same sense as saving your reverence (see Saving): Rom. I, 4, 42 (the surreptitious Q1 and M. Edd. this sir reverence).
2) to preserve from eternal death: “my beauty will be --d by merit,” LLL IV, 1, 21. “I shall be --d by my husband,” Merch. III, 5, 21 (cf. 1 Corinthians VII, 14: the unbelieving wife is sanctified by the husband). “to be --d by believing,” Tw. III, 2, 75. “if men were to be --d by merit,” H4A I, 2, 119. “so Christ s. me,” H5 III, 2, 97. “I have a --ing faith within me,” V, 2, 217. “there be souls must be --d,” Oth. II, 3, 106. Oth. II, 3, 106 Oth. II, 3, 106 Oth. II, 3, 106 “no, as I shall be --d,” IV, 2, 86. “he that will believe all that they say, shall never be --d by half that they do,” Ant. V, 2, 257.
3) to keep undamaged or untouched: “his youthful hose, well --d,” As II, 7, 160. “that honour --d may upon asking give,” Tw. III, 4, 232. “to s. unscratched your city's threatened cheeks,” John II, 225. “s. me a piece of marchpane,” Rom. I, 5, 9. “couldst thou s. nothing? didst thou give them all?” Lr. III, 4, 66. Absol.: “he is gone to s. far off, whilst others come to make him lose at home,” R2 II, 2, 80.
4) to lay up, to gather: “the thrifty hire I --d under your father,” As II, 3, 39.
5) to keep to one's self, not to spend, to spare: “to s. the money that he spends in trimming,” Err. II, 2, 98. “to s. their gifts,” Merch. IV, 1, 444. to s. both (charge and trouble) Wint. I, 2, 26. “to s. the blood on either side,” H4A V, 1, 99. “s. that labour,” Lucr. 1290. Err. IV, 1, 14. As II, 7, 8. Troil. III, 3, 241. Cor. I, 3, 90. Oth. V, 1, 101. “s. your word,” All's V, 2, 40. “s. your thanks,” Wint. I, 2, 54. Troil. IV, 4, 119. “I may s. speech,” Oth. IV, 1, 291 etc.
6) to hinder from spending or being spent, from using or being used, to make superfluous: “you might have --d me my pains,” Tw. II, 2, 6. “a thousand sighs to s.” II, 4, 64. “thou hast --d me a thousand marks in links,” H4A III, 3, 48. “and --d the treacherous labour of your son,” V, 4, 57. “--s me so much talking,” H8 I, 4, 40. “I'll s. you that labour,” II, 1, 3. “and --d your husband so much sweat,” Cor. IV, 1, 18. “--d me a day's journey,” IV, 3, 12. “you have --d my longing, and I feed most hungerly on your sight,” Tim. I, 1, 261.
7) to spare, to treat with pity, not to destroy: “relent and s. my life,” H6B IV, 7, 124. “--ing of thy life,” Caes. V, 3, 38. “s. him,” Lr. V, 3, 151. “makes the true man killed and --s the thief,” Cymb. II, 3, 76.
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