previous next
Say, vb. (impf. and partic. said; partic. sain used by Armado in rhyming) 1) to utter, to express, declare or pronounce in words: Ven. 12. Ven. 12 Ven. 12 Ven. 12 Ven. 12 Ven. 12 Ven. 12 Ven. 12 Ven. 12 535 (s. Good night). 537 “(s. Adieu).” Ven. 12 Ven. 12 Ven. 12 Ven. 12 Ven. 12 Ven. 12 Ven. 12 Lucr. 320 (as who should say; cf. Ven. 280; see “Should).” Ven. 280 505 etc. etc. “to say farewell,” R3 I, 2, 225. Ant. IV, 14, 90. The passive personally: “thou art said to have a stubborn soul,” Meas. V, 485. Ado I, 3, 32. Mids. I, 1, 238. Tw. IV, 2, 10. Cor. IV, 5, 243. Mcb. II, 3, 34. With of == concerning, about: “so of collected sorrow may be said,” Ven. 333. “what you said of the duke,” Meas. V, 334. As IV, 1, 47 etc. The addressed person preceded by “to:” Gent. IV, 3, 35. Tw. I, 5, 153. IV, 2, 16 etc. To omitted after to say nay == to refuse, when the dative is placed between say and nay: “said him nay,” John I, 275. “you'll say a beggar nay,” R3 III, 1, 119. Rom. II, 2, 96. “I can say nay to thee,” R3 III, 7, 53. Having to before the person or thing spoken of, in the sense of to think, to judge of: “what the old world could say to this composed wonder of your frame,” Sonn. 59, 9. “what say you to a letter from your friends of much good news,” Gent. II, 4, 51. “what says she to my little jewel?” IV, 4, 51. “what says Silvia to my suit?” V, 2, 1. V, 2, 1 “what says she to me?” Wiv. II, 2, 81. “what say you to young Master Fenton?” III, 2, 67. Meas. IV, 2, 131. Merch. I, 2, 71. Shr. IV, 3, 17. 20 “(how say you to a fat tripe?).” Tw. I, 5, 88 “(how say you to that?).” John IV, 2, 132. R2 III, 2, 177. H4A V, 1, 15. H4B I, 2, 1. H6C IV, 1, 107. Rom. III, 3, 97. Lr. I, 1, 241. IV, 6, 100. Oth. I, 3, 74. V, 2, 293. Similarly: “how say you by the French lord?” Merch. I, 2, 58. “how sayest thou that my master is become a notable lover?” Gent. II, 5, 43. Mcb. III, 4, 128.
“To say so:” Ven. 536. Tp. II, 2, 65. III, 1, 37. Meas. III, 2, 195. Ado II, 1, 136. LLL IV, 3, 5 etc. etc. no, “sayst me so, friend?” Shr. I, 2, 190. “sayst thou me so?” H6B II, 1, 109 (me a dativus ethicus).
I say, inserted emphatically: “how would, I say, mine eyes be blessed made,” Sonn. 43, 9. “O, if, I say, you look upon this verse,” 71, 9. “new created the creatures that were mine, I say, or changed them,” Tp. I, 2, 82. “what, I say, my foot my tutor?” Tp. I, 2, 82 Especially in commanding, or calling to, a person: “stand, I say,” Ven. 284. “out of our way, I say,” Tp. I, 1, 29. “what, Robin, I say,” Wiv. III, 3, 4. “Bardolph, I say,” III, 5, 1. Tp. I, 2, 315. Gent. IV, 4, 66. V, 4, 122. Wiv. IV, 2, 125. Meas. I, 1, 16. V, 460. Ado III, 3, 104. Merch. II, 5, 6. H4B V, 1, 2. H8 II, 4, 241. Cor. III, 3, 40. Rom. I, 3, 58. IV, 2, 30. Tim. II, 1, 14. Caes. II, 1, 3. Mcb. V, 3, 20. Lr. I, 4, 350. II, 1, 21 etc. “avoid the gallery; ha! I have said, be gone,” H8 V, 1, 86. I have said == yes, as I said: Mcb. IV, 3, 213. Ant. I, 2, 58.
Say you? == what do you say? “not better than he, by her own report. Say you?” Meas. V, 275. “what imports this song? Say you? nay, pray you, mark,” Hml. IV, 5, 28. “heaven bless us. Say you?” Oth. III, 4, 82. “you are cock and capon too. Sayest thou?” Cymb. II, 1, 27. “say you, sir? Thy name. Fidele,” IV, 2, 379. cf. “how say you? O, I should remember him,” Wiv. I, 4, 29.
2) to tell: “the mariners say how thou hast disposed,” Tp. I, 2, 225. “say what thou seest yond,” Tp. I, 2, 225 “say how thou camest here,” V, 181. “say how you came hither,” V, 181 “say, Lucetta, wouldst thou counsel me to fall in love?” Gent. I, 2, 1. “say, from whom?” Gent. I, 2, 1 “say, who gave it thee?” Gent. I, 2, 1 “and may I say to thee, this pride of hers hath drawn my love from her,” III, 1, 72. “the duke, I say to thee again, would eat mutton on Fridays,” Meas. III, 2, 192. “say in brief the cause,” Err. I, 1, 29. “say to me, when sawest thou the Prince Florizel?” Wint. IV, 2, 28. “canst thou say all this and never blush,” Tit. V, 1, 121. “say to the king the knowledge of the broil as thou didst leave it,” Mcb. I, 2, 6. “the lady shall say her mind freely,” Hml. II, 2, 338. “say to me, whose fortunes shall rise higher,” Ant. II, 3, 15. “say to Ventidius I would speak with him,” Ant. II, 3, 15 “shall I say to Caesar what you require of him?” III, 13, 65. “say his name,” Cymb. IV, 2, 376 etc.
3) to mention: “the said Henry shall espouse the Lady Margaret,” H6B I, 1, 46.
4) to speak: “to say grace,” Meas. I, 2, 20. Merch. II, 2, 202. Tit. IV, 3, 100. “to say one's prayers:” Wiv. V, 5, 54. Ado II, 1, 108. All's I, 1, 227. Wint. V, 3, 140. H5 IV, 2, 56. Troil. II, 3, 22. Cymb. IV, 2, 391 etc. Absol.: “you say honestly,” Ado II, 1, 242. “you say not right, old man,” V, 1, 73. “say on,” As III, 2, 264. “I have to say with you,” John IV, 1, 8. “first hear me speak. Well, say,” Cor. III, 3, 41. “answer to us. Say then,” Cor. III, 3, 41 “say, what, is Horatio here?” Hml. I, 1, 18. “ye say honestly,” Rom. I, 2, 65. “hast most rightly said,” Lr. I, 1, 186. “say in mine ear,” Ant. II, 7, 42. “say boldly,” III, 13, 47. “go to, say no more,” Oth. IV, 1, 177 (enough of it; agreed). “I have said,” Ant. III, 2, 34 (== I have no more to say). “you have said but whether wisely or no, let the forest judge,” As III, 2, 129. you have said == well said, quite right: Gent. II, 4, 29. Tw. III, 1, 12. Oth. IV, 2, 204. Ant. II, 6, 113. “there thou sayest,” Hml. V, 1, 29 (== speakest to the purpose; the clown's speech). to say well == 1) to speak well and to the purpose: Wint. I, 2, 90. H8 III, 2, 149. H8 III, 2, 149 H8 III, 2, 149 Troil. II, 2, 163. 2) to be right: “thou hast said well, for some of you there present are worse than devils,” Tp. III, 3, 35. “said I well?” Wiv. I, 3, 11. “ha, Sir John, said I well?” H4B III, 2, 227. “ill will never said well,” H5 III, 7, 123. “you say well,” Rom. II, 4, 130. well said == 1) spoken well and to the purpose: Wiv. IV, 2, 141. Meas. II, 2, 89. Ado III, 5, 38. LLL V, 2, 552. Merch. II, 9, 37. As I, 2, 112. Shr. I, 1, 73. Tw. IV, 2, 31. H4A I, 2, 161. H4B III, 2, 169. H6B II, 1, 111. Troil. III, 1, 61. V, 1, 14. V, 2, 75. Cor. III, 2, 31. Rom. II, 4, 65. IV, 4, 19. Hml. II, 1, 6. 2) well done: As II, 6, 14. H4A IV, 1, 1. V, 4, 75. H4B III, 2, 295. V, 3, 10. H6B I, 4, 16. H8 I, 4, 30. Tit. IV, 3, 63. Rom. I, 5, 88. Hml. I, 5, 162. Oth. II, 1, 169. IV, 1, 117. V, 1, 98. Ant. II, 5, 46. IV, 4, 28. Per. III, 2, 87.
5) The imperative say == suppose; followed by the subjunctive: “say that the sense of feeling were bereft me, yet would my love to thee be still as much,” Ven. 439. “say, for non-payment that the debt should double, is twenty hundred kisses such a trouble?” Ven. 439 “say, this were death,” Tp. II, 1, 260. “but say this weed her love from Valentine, it follows not that she will love Sir Thurio,” Gent. III, 2, 49. “say that she be,” IV, 2, 109. “say that she rail: why then I'll tell her plain she sings as sweetly as a nightingale,” Shr. II, 171. “'tis most dangerous. Say it be, 'tis true,” Wint. I, 2, 298. “say that she were gone, a moiety of my rest might come to me again,” II, 3, 7. “say there be,” IV, 4, 88. “say he be taken, I know no pain will make him say I moved him to those arms,” H6B III, 1, 376. “say that he thrive,” H6B III, 1, 376 “say that King Edward take thee for his queen,” H6C III, 2, 89. “but say it were not registered,” R3 III, 1, 75. “say that Marcius return me unheard, what then?” Cor. V, 1, 41. Followed by an indicative: “well, say I am,” LLL I, 1, 102. “but say it is my humour: is it answered?” Merch. IV, 1, 43. “say that some lady, as perhaps there is, hath for your love as great a pang of heart,” Tw. II, 4, 92. “well, say there is no kingdom then for Richard, what other pleasure can the world afford?” H6C III, 2, 146. “say they are vile and false,” Oth. III, 3, 136. Uncertain, whether indic. or subjunctive: LLL II, 133. Shr. Ind. 2, 42. Shr. Ind. 2, 42. Tw. I, 4, 23. H6C V, 4, 29. R3 I, 2, 89. IV, 4, 288. Oth. IV, 3, 88. Oth. IV, 3, 88 Ant. V, 2, 164. Ant. V, 2, 164 say so == suppose it to be the case; if so: Troil. II, 1, 5. cf. “and by a sleep to say we end the heartache and the thousand natural shocks that flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation devoutly to be wished,” Hml. III, 1, 61.
hide Dictionary Entry Lookup
Use this tool to search for dictionary entries in all lexica.
Search for in
hide Display Preferences
Greek Display:
Arabic Display:
View by Default:
Browse Bar: