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Summer, the warmest part of the year: Ven. 91. Ven. 91 Lucr. 837. Sonn. 5, 5. 6, 2. 54, 8. 104, 14. Pilgr. 160. Wiv. II, 1, 127. Ado II, 3, 75. LLL I, 1, 102. Mids. II, 1, 82. Mids. II, 1, 82 Merch. II, 9, 94. III, 1, 66. V, 264. All's IV, 4, 31. Tw. I, 5, 21. Wint. I, 1, 6. IV, 4, 80. IV, 4, 80 V, 3, 51. John V, 7, 30 “(there is so hot a s. in my bosom, that all my bowels crumble up to dust).” R2 I, 3, 299. H4B III, 2, 144. H5 I, 2, 194. V, 2, 340. H6B I, 1, 81. II, 4, 2. H6C II, 2, 164. V, 7, 18. R3 I, 1, 2. III, 1, 94 “(short --s lightly have a forward spring).” Tit. II, 3, 94. V, 2, 172. Rom. I, 3, 77. II, 2, 121. Mcb. I, 6, 3. Cymb. IV, 2, 219. IV, 4, 29. Per. II, 5, 36. With the def. art., in a general sense: “the s. still doth tend upon my state,” Mids. III, 1, 158. “show not their mealy wings but to the s.” Troil. III, 3, 79.
Compounded with other words: “s. air,” LLL V, 2, 293. Rom. II, 6, 19. “their s. beauty,” R3 IV, 3, 13. “s. bird,” H4B IV, 4, 91. Tim. III, 6, 34. “s. buds,” Mids. II, 1, 110. “s. butterflies,” Cor. IV, 6, 94. “s. corn,” R2 III, 3, 162. “s. days,” Per. IV, 1, 18. “s. grass,” H5 I, 1, 65. “s. fields,” R3 V, 2, 8. “s. flies,” LLL V, 2, 408. H6C II, 6, 17. Oth. IV, 2, 66 (Qq --'s flies). “s. house,” H4A III, 1, 164. “s. leaves,” R2 I, 2, 20. “s. morn,” Pilgr. 159. “s. news,” Cymb. III, 4, 12. “s. smocks,” LLL V, 2, 916. “s. songs,” Wint. IV, 2, 11.
On the other hand: “a --'s bower,” H4A III, 1, 210. “a --'s cloud,” Mcb. III, 4, 111. “--'s corn,” H6B III, 2, 176. “a --'s day,” Ven. 23. Sonn. 18, 1. Mids. I, 2, 89. H5 III, 6, 67. IV, 8, 23. Tit. V, 1, 14. “in --'s drought,” Tit. III, 1, 19. “the --'s dust,” R2 III, 3, 43. “on a --'s evening,” Caes. III, 2, 176. “--'s flies,” Oth. IV, 2, 66 (Ff s. flies). “as clear as is the --'s sun,” H5 I, 2, 86. “--'s time,” Sonn. 97, 5. “any --'s story,” Sonn. 98, 7.
“All-hallown s.” H4A I, 2, 178 (== late summer; as an emblem of an old man with the passions of youth). “expect Saint Martin's s.” H6A I, 2, 131 (see Martin). “on the bat's back I do fly after s. merrily,” Tp. V, 92; cf. “the swallow follows not s. more willing,” Tim. III, 6, 31.
S. implying the idea of all that is pleasant and gratifying: “could make me any --'s story tell,” Sonn. 98, 7. “thou art a s. bird, which ever in the haunch of winter sings the lifting up of day,” H4B IV, 4, 91. “to those men that sought him sweet as s.” H8 IV, 2, 54. if't “be s. news, smile to't before,” Cymb. III, 4, 12. as one shall see in a --'s day == it would be a lucky hit, if you should happen to see the like: “a proper man, as one shall see in a --'s day,” Mids. I, 2, 89 (Quince's speech). “uttered as brave words at the bridge as you shall see in a --'s day,” H5 III, 6, 67. “a most contagious treason come to light, as you shall desire in a --'s day,” IV, 8, 23 (Fluellen's speeches).
Used for the whole year: “five --s,” Err. I, 1, 133. cf. R2 I, 3, 141. H8 III, 2, 360. Rom. I, 2, 10. Per. I, 4, 39 (O. Edd. savours).
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