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Sweet, adj. pleasing to any sense; as to the taste: “one s. kiss,” Ven. 84. “for one s. grape who will the vine destroy?” Lucr. 215. “s. honey,” Gent. I, 2, 106. Troil. V, 10, 45. Rom. II, 6, 11. “a surfeit of the --est things,” Mids. II, 2, 137. “s. hay,” IV, 1, 37. “--est nut hath sourest rind,” As III, 2, 115. “things s. to taste prove in digestion sour,” R2 I, 3, 236. “have their palates both for s. and sour,” Oth. IV, 3, 96. “s. fish,” Cymb. IV, 2, 36 etc. Peculiar expression: she hath a s. mouth (== she has a sweet tooth, is dainty-mouthed) Gent. III, 1, 330. Agreeable to the smell, fragrant: “the fields' chief flower, s. above compare,” Ven. 8. “the flowers are s.” Ven. 8 “s. issue of a more s. smelling sire,” Ven. 8 their (flowers') “substance still lives s.” Sonn. 5, 14. “s. muskroses,” Mids. II, 1, 252. “s. breath,” IV, 2, 44. “wrapped in s. clothes,” Shr. Ind. 1, 38. “burn s. wood to make the lodging s.” Shr. Ind. 1, 38. “I smell s. savours,” 2, 73. “s. marjoram,” All's IV, 5, 17 and Lr. IV, 6, 94. “s. beds of flowers,” Tw. I, 1, 40. very s. and contagious (breath) II, 3, 57. “gloves as s. as damask roses,” Wint. IV, 4, 222. Wint. IV, 4, 222 “call for s. water, wash thy hands,” Tit. II, 4, 6 (i. e. perfumed water); cf. “which with s. water nightly I will dew,” Rom. V, 3, 14. “as s. as balm,” Ant. V, 2, 314 etc. etc. Pleasing to the ear: “marvellous s. music,” Tp. III, 3, 19. Gent. II, 7, 28. “s. air,” Tp. I, 2, 393. III, 2, 145. Mids. I, 1, 183. “with some s. concert,” Gent. III, 2, 84. such s. complaining grievance, 86 (some M. Edd. sweet-complaining). “s. harmony,” Merch. V, 57. “s. sounds,” Merch. V, 57 “silver hath a s. sound,” Rom. IV, 5, 134. “s. instruments hung up in cases,” Tim. I, 2, 102. “s. bells jangled,” Hml. III, 1, 166 etc. To the touch (== soft): “s. bottom-grass,” Ven. 236. “a s. embrace,” Ven. 236 Ven. 236 “when the s. wind did gently kiss the trees,” Merch. V, 2. “the air most s.” Wint. III, 1, 1. Troil. III, 2, 54.
Hence in general == pleasing, delightful, lovely, charming: “that s. coral mouth,” Ven. 542. “s. lips,” Ven. 542 “the s. channel of her bosom,” Ven. 542 “s. beginning, but unsavoury end,” Ven. 542 “to make the breach and enter this s. city,” Lucr. 469. “the story of s. chastity's decay,” Lucr. 469 “such s. observance in this work was had,” Lucr. 469 “loathsome canker lives in --est bud,” Sonn. 35, 4. s. fire (of the eye) Pilgr. 68 and LLLIV, 2, 120. “these s. thoughts,” Tp. III, 1, 14. “'twas a s. marriage,” II, 1, 72. “no s. aspersion shall the heavens let fall,” IV, 18. “in the --est bud the eating canker dwells,” Gent. I, 1, 42. “hear s. discourse,” I, 3, 31. “omitting the s. benefit of time to clothe mine age with angel-like perfection,” II, 4, 65. “a s. virtue in a maid,” III, 1, 277. “give up your body to such s. uncleanness,” Meas. II, 4, 54. “either death or life shall thereby be the --er,” III, 1, 6. “'tis a physic that's bitter to s. end,” IV, 6, 8. “my s. hope's aim,” Err. III, 2, 63. “s. recreation barred,” V, 78. “so s. and voluble is his discourse,” LLL II, 76 (cf. “a Roman sworder murdered s. Tully,” H6B IV, 1, 136). “so s. a changeling,” Mids. II, 1, 23. “s. are the uses of adversity,” As II, 1, 12. “the s. sound that breathes upon a bank of violets,” Tw. I, 1, 5. “'tis not so s. now as it was before,” Tw. I, 1, 5 “nature's own s. and cunning hand,” I, 5, 258. “so s. a breath to sing,” II, 3, 21. “this affliction has a taste as s. as any cordial comfort,” Wint. V, 3, 76. “the s. milk of concord,” Mcb. IV, 3, 98. “'tis most s., when in one line two crafts directly meet,” Hml. III, 4, 209 etc.
== kind, gentle, mild, meek: “welcomes the warm approach of s. desire,” Ven. 386. “for one s. look,” Ven. 386 “chiding that tongue that ever s. was used in giving gentle doom,” Sonn. 145, 6. “the s. glances of thy honoured love,” Gent. I, 1, 4. “some other mistress hath thy s. aspects,” Err. II, 2, 113. “this most patient, s. and virtuous wife,” Shr. III, 2, 197. “that their souls may make a peaceful and a s. retire,” H5 IV, 3, 86. “plant Christian-like accord in their s. bosoms,” H5 V, 2, 382 (a prolepsis, cf. Appendix; == in their bosoms which thus may become kind). “to those men that sought him s. as summer,” H8 IV, 2, 54. “s. mercy is nobility's true badge,” Tit. I, 119. “let me report to him your s. dependency,” Ant. V, 2, 26 etc. In a bad sense, == feigning kindness and friendship, smooth, hypocritical: “a blister on his s. tongue!” LLL V, 2, 335. “that there should be small love 'mongst these s. knaves,” Tim. I, 1, 258. “s. words, low-crooked courtesies,” Caes. III, 1, 42. he (death) “hides him in fresh cups, soft beds, s. words,” Cymb. V, 3, 72.
With to, == dear: “a something s. to thee,” Sonn. 136, 12. “thy life to me is s.” H6A IV, 6, 55.
Hence a general word of endearment: “s. boy,” Ven. 155. Ven. 155 Ven. 155 “s. seals,” Ven. 155 “s. Death, I did but jest,” Ven. 155 “s. sprites, the burthen bear,” Tp. I, 2, 381. s. lord, “you play me false,” V, 172. “s. heart,” LLL V, 1, 115; cf. V, 2, 1 and Tit. I, 481 (see Sweetheart). Gent. I, 1, 11. Gent. I, 1, 11 I, 3, 45. II, 1, 4. II, 4, 37. II, 5, 3. III, 2, 90. Wiv. II, 1, 155. Meas. III, 1, 133. V, 435. V, 435 Err. V, 197 etc. “pardon me, s. one,” Tw. V, 221. “to the s. Julia,” Gent. I, 2, 125. “aiming at Silvia as a --er friend,” II, 6, 30. “the s. woman leads an ill life with him,” Wiv. II, 2, 92. “my s. love,” Ven. 1188. “his s. uplocked treasure,” Sonn. 52, 2. “thy s. beloved name,” 89, 10. “my --est friend,” 133, 4. “my s. mistress,” Tp. III, 1, 11. Gent. IV, 4, 182. “for thy more s. understanding,” LLL I, 1, 267 (Armado's letter). “set not thy s. heart on proud array,” Lr. III, 4, 85. “s. my child” LLL I, 2, 71. “s. my lord,” V, 2, 882. “s. my coz,” As I, 2, 1. “s. my lord,” Troil. IV, 2, 2. Applied even to heaven and celestial things: “s. welkin,” LLL III, 68. “is there not rain enough in the s. heavens to wash it white as snow,” Hml. III, 3, 45. “and s. religion makes a rhapsody of words,” III, 4, 47. “let me not be mad, s. heaven,” Lr. I, 5, 50. broke them (oaths) “in the s. face of heaven,” III, 4, 91. “Amen to that, s. powers,” Oth. II, 1, 197 (cf. in German: der liebe Himmel).
Substantively, in the same sense: “bid my s. prepare to chide,” Rom. III, 3, 162. “--s to the s.” Hml. V, 1, 266. “liegers for her s.” Cymb. I, 5, 80. Especially in the vocative: “thus far for love my love-suit, s., fulfil,” Sonn. 136, 4. “s., now, silence!” Tp. IV, 124; cf. Err. IV, 2, 29. “s., except not any,” Gent. II, 4, 154. Err. III, 2, 66. Ado V, 4, 55. LLL IV, 1, 109. V, 2, 329 “(the ladies call him s.).” Mids. II, 2, 45. III, 2, 247. V, 99. Merch. II, 6, 44. II, 9, 77. As III, 2, 264. Wint. IV, 4, 136. R2 V, 1, 20. Troil. III, 1, 172. III, 2, 137. III, 3, 222. Tit. I, 431. Rom. II, 2, 120. Rom. II, 2, 120 Hml. III, 2, 235. Oth. III, 3, 56. Ant. III, 7, 24 etc. “O my s.” Compl. 239. LLL IV, 2, 145. V, 2, 132. Oth. II, 1, 207. “gentle s.” Mids. V, 87. LLL V, 2, 373. “good s.” Merch. III, 5, 76. “dear my s.” Tw. II, 5, 192.
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