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Tie, vb. to bind, to fasten with a knot: “to t. the rider she begins to prove,” Ven. 40. if the --d (viz. dog) “were lost,” Gent. II, 3, 41. Gent. II, 3, 41 Gent. II, 3, 41 Ill t. them (horses) “in the wood,” H4A I, 2, 199. II, 2, 12. “horses are --d by the heads,” Lr. II, 4, 8. “--ing his new shoes with old ribands,” Rom. III, 1, 31. “one that --s his points,” Ant. III, 13, 157. “her hair, nor loose, nor --d in formal plat,” Compl. 29. “shave the head and t. the beard,” Meas. IV, 2, 187 (some M. Edd. tire, others dye). Metaphorically: “sin and obstinacy t. thy tongue,” All's I, 3, 186. “--d it by letters-patents,” H8 III, 2, 250 (fastened, confirmed it). “one that by suggestion --d all the kingdom,” IV, 2, 36 (cf. suggestion). “Cressid is mine, --d with the bonds of heaven,” Troil. V, 2, 154. “--ing her duty, beauty . . . . in an extravagant stranger,” Oth. I, 1, 136. “the band that seems to t. their friendship together,” Ant. II, 6, 129.
With to: “the steed, being --d unto a tree,” Ven. 263. Ven. 263 “have their provender --d to their mouth,” H6A I, 2, 11. Troil. V, 8, 21. Cor. III, 1, 314. Tit. II, 1, 17. Mcb. V, 7, 1. Lr. III, 7, 54. Ant. III, 11, 57. Metaphorically, == to bind to: “whereto all bonds do t. me,” Sonn. 117, 4. 137, 8. their (the eyes') “poor balls are --d to the orbed earth,” Compl. 24 (fixed). “t. the wiser souls to thy false seeming,” Meas. II, 4, 14. Shr. III, 1, 19. John II, 470. R2 IV, 77. H4A I, 3, 238. H6C IV, 1, 66. H8 II, 2, 90. Cor. II, 3, 205. Lr. IV, 2, 14. Cymb. I, 6, 23. III, 7, 15. Per. II, 5, 8 (she has so strictly --d her to her chamber, == confined). With an infinitive: “will t. the hearers to attend each line,” Lucr. 818. “I am --d to be obedient,” Shr. I, 1, 217 (obliged). R2 I, 1, 63. Cor. II, 2, 69. Here and where == hereto, whereto: “his liking, where you were --d in duty,” Wint. V, 1, 213. “she hath --d sharp-toothed unkindness, like a vulture, here,” Lr. II, 4, 136. to t. over to == to put off to or till: “this moral --s me over to time and a hot summer,” H5 V, 2, 339.
With up, == to bind completely, so as to hinder from any motion: “to unloose this --d up justice,” Meas. I, 3, 32. “if 'twill t. up thy discontented sword,” Ant. II, 6, 6. “t. up the libertine in a field of feasts,” II, 1, 23. “my horse is --d up safe,” Cymb. IV, 1, 24. “t. my treasure up in silken bags,” Per. III, 2, 41. Used of the tongue: “t. up my love's tongue,” Mids. III, 1, 206. death . . . --s “up my tongue,” Rom. IV, 5, 32. cf. “this thy praise cannot be so thy praise, to t. up envy evermore enlarged,” Sonn. 70, 12 (== to put it to silence). “what king so strong can t. the gall up in the slanderous tongue?” Meas. III, 2, 199.
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