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Tire, vb. 1) trans. a) to fatigue, to weary; absol.: “he hath faults . . . to t. in repetition,” Cor. I, 1, 47. “witness the --ing day and heavy night,” Tit. V, 2, 24. With an object: Lucr. 1363. LLL IV, 3, 307. R2 V, 5, 94. R3 IV, 4, 188. H8 I, 1, 134. Oth. II, 1, 65. --d == weary: Ven. 561. Lucr. 1617. Sonn. 27, 2. Err. IV, 3, 24. Shr. IV, 1, 1. Shr. IV, 1, 1 Tw. III, 4, 152 “(--d out of breath).” R2 IV, 178. H4A III, 1, 160. H5 II, 1, 26. Troil. III, 2, 183. Cor. I, 9, 91. Caes. I, 2, 115. Refl.: “self-will himself doth t.” Lucr. 707. “when thou hast --d thyself in base comparisons,” H4A II, 4, 276. “I have --d myself,” Cymb. III, 6, 2.
b) to fill with satiety, to make sick of sth., to disgust: “the beast that bears me, --d with my woe,” Sonn. 50, 5. “--d with all these, for restful death I cry,” 66, 1. “and t. the hearer with a book of words,” Ado I, 1, 309. “I have stayed to t. your royalty,” Wint. I, 2, 15. “to prove more fortunes thou art --d,” Cor. IV, 5, 100. “then should not we be --d with this ado,” Tit. II, 1, 98. “within a dull, stale, --d bed,” Lr. I, 2, 13. Fortune, --d with doing bad, Per. II Prol. 37.
2) intr. to be fatigued, to become weary: “your wit will t.” LLL II, 120. “as truest horse that yet would never t.” Mids. III, 1, 98. Mids. III, 1, 98 your sad (heart) “--s in a mile,” Wint. IV, 3, 135. “he --s betimes that spurs too fast,” R2 II, 1, 36. the posts come --ing on, H4B Ind. R2 II, 1, 36*
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