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Title, 1) an inscription put over any thing as a name by which it is distinguished: tell me once more what t. thou (a casket) “dost bear,” Merch. II, 9, 35. cf. Title-leaf and Title-page.
2) an appellation of dignity and honour: Lucr. 892. Sonn. 25, 2. Meas. V, 56. LLL IV, 1, 85. All's II, 3, 124. All's II, 3, 124 All's II, 3, 124 John II, 492. R2 II, 1, 226. II, 3, 72. II, 3, 72 III, 3, 11. IV, 255. H4A V, 3, 23. H5 IV, 1, 271. H5 IV, 1, 271 H6A IV, 7, 85. V, 4, 151. V, 5, 38. H6B I, 2, 73. I, 3, 51. H6C II, 2, 140. III, 3, 8. III, 3, 8 IV, 1, 68. IV, 1, 68 R3 I, 4, 78. R3 I, 4, 78 III, 1, 99. IV, 1, 20. IV, 4, 348. H8 II, 3, 39. H8 II, 3, 39 III, 1, 140. IV, 2, 112. Troil. III, 1, 17. Cor. III, 1, 144. Tit. V, 1, 5. Tim. IV, 3, 36. Mcb. I, 2, 65. I, 5, 8. Lr. I, 4, 163. V, 3, 48. V, 3, 48 Oth. I, 2, 31. Cymb. I, 1, 31. V, 2, 7.
3) any appellation or name: “what a happy t. do I find, happy to have thy love, happy to die,” Sonn. 92, 11 (== how am I to be called happy). “this deceit loses the name of craft, of disobedience, or unduteous title,” Wiv. V, 5, 240 (unduteous t. == name of undutifulness). it may be I go under that t. (the prince's fool) Ado II, 1, 212. “think you of a worse t., and I will fit her to it,” III, 2, 114. “tough senior, as an appertinent t. to your old time,” LLL I, 2, 18. I will love her everlastingly. But how long shall that t. 'ever' “last?” R3 IV, 4, 350. “a proper t. of a peace,” H8 I, 1, 98 (== a peace properly called so). “Romeo would, were he not Romeo called, retain that dear perfection which he owes without that t.” Rom. II, 2, 47. the devil himself could not pronounce a t. more hateful to mine ear (than Macbeth) Mcb. V, 7, 8. LLL IV, 2, 39. Merch. III, 1, 15. Shr. I, 2, 130. III, 2, 125. Wint. II, 1, 94. IV, 4, 872. R2 I, 1, 24. H4A II, 4, 307. III, 2, 110. V, 4, 79. H6B III, 1, 359. R3 IV, 4, 300. R3 IV, 4, 300 H8 IV, 1, 96. V, 3, 138. Tim. I, 2, 94. Cymb. I, 4, 96. Per. V, 1, 205.
4) a claim, a right: Sonn. 46, 9. Mids. I, 1, 92. John II, 192. John II, 192 John II, 192 H4A II, 3, 85. IV, 3, 104. H5 I, 2, 16. H5 I, 2, 16 H5 I, 2, 16 H5 I, 2, 16 H5 I, 2, 16 H6A II, 5, 92. H6B III, 1, 92. V, 1, 176. H6C I, 1, 130. H6C I, 1, 130 H6C I, 1, 130 H6C I, 1, 130 II, 2, 160. III, 1, 48. III, 2, 129. IV, 7, 57. Tit. I, 4. Tim. IV, 3, 154. Mcb. IV, 3, 34. With in: “to have his t. live in Aquitaine,” LLL II, 146. “Arthur's t. in the whole,” John II, 562. “my t. in the queen,” H6B I, 1, 12. With to: “the justice of your t. to him,” Meas. IV, 1, 74. “his --s to some dukedoms,” H5 I, 1, 87. “my t. to England's crown,” H6B II, 2, 4. H6C I, 1, 102. H6C I, 1, 102 III, 3, 145. IV, 7, 46. H8 I, 2, 144. Ant. V, 2, 291. to make t. == to lay claim: “she may lawfully make t. to as much love as she finds,” All's I, 3, 107. “make claim and t. to the crown of France,” H5 I, 2, 68. With an inf.: “having so great a t. to be more prince,” John IV, 1, 10. With of: “lost that t. of respect which the proud soul ne'er pays but to the proud,” H4A I, 3, 8.
5) property, possession (as founding a right): “to say nothing, to do nothing, to know nothing, and to have nothing, is to be a great part of your t.” All's II, 4, 27. “the sword which sways usurpingly these several --s,” John I, 13. “to guard a t. that was rich before,” IV, 2, 10. “for ever should they be expulsed from France and not have t. of an earldom here,” H6A III, 3, 26. so much interest have I in thy sorrow as I had t. in thy noble husband (as his mother) R3 II, 2, 48. “to leave his wife, to leave his babes, his mansion and his --s in a place from whence himself does fly,” Mcb. IV, 2, 7. “now does he feel his t. hang loose about him,” V, 2, 20; cf. IV, 3, 34.
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