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True, 1) conformable to fact: Ven. 658. Tp. I, 2, 267. II, 1, 50. II, 1, 50 II, 1, 50 III, 3, 26. Epil. III, 3, 26 Gent. I, 1, 25. Gent. I, 1, 25 II, 1, 87. V, 2, 13. V, 4, 110. Wiv. I, 1, 162. II, 1, 132. Meas. V, 43. Meas. V, 43 Mids. I, 1, 95. III, 2, 280. All's IV, 3, 66 etc. etc. “to say t.” Sonn. 114, 3. Wiv. II, 2, 49. All's IV, 3, 171. Tw. II, 5, 213. H4A I, 3, 250 etc. “to speak t.” Tp. II, 1, 20. III, 1, 70. LLL V, 2, 364. As V, 4, 82. H6B III, 1, 183. Troil. III, 2, 105 etc. to tell (one) “t.” Gent. II, 5, 35. Wiv. III, 4, 11. Meas. II, 1, 233. Err. V, 180. Ado II, 1, 121. Ado II, 1, 121 LLL I, 1, 227. IV, 1, 18. Mids. III, 2, 68. Merch. III, 2, 259. All's I, 3, 181. All's I, 3, 181 IV, 3, 183. V, 3, 234. H4A V, 3, 6. Troil. I, 1, 60 “(as t. thou tellest me).” IV, 1, 51. Cor. V, 2, 33. Tim. I, 2, 223. IV, 3, 513. Ant. I, 2, 102. IV, 6, 26 etc. “and t. he swore, though yet forsworn he were,” Err. IV, 2, 10. Substantively: “my false o'erweighs your t.” Meas. II, 4, 170.
2) veracious, free from falsehood, not lying, not mistaken, not feigned: “these mine eyes, t. leaders to their queen,” Ven. 503. “sweets that shall the --st sight beguile,” Ven. 503 “my t. eyes have never practised how to cloak offences,” Lucr. 748. “with soft slow tongue, t. mark of modesty,” Lucr. 748 “what eyes hath love put in my head, which have no correspondence with t. sight,” Sonn. 148, 2. “love's eye is not so t. as all men's No,” Sonn. 148, 2 Sonn. 148, 2 “give the lie to my t. sight,” 150, 3. “if these be t. spies which I wear in my head,” Tp. V, 259. “with t. prayers, that shall be up at heaven,” Meas. II, 2, 151. “my t. complaint,” V, 24. “there are no faces --r than those that are so washed,” Ado I, 1, 27. “fair she is, if that mine eyes be t.” Merch. II, 6, 54. “with many vows of faith and ne'er a t. one,” V, 20. “you have deserved high commendation, t. applause and love,” As I, 2, 275. “if sight and shape be t.” V, 4, 126. “is there no exorcist beguiles the --r office of mine eyes,” All's V, 3, 306. “it is with me, as the very t. sonnet is,” Tw. III, 4, 24. “prove t., imagination,” Tw. III, 4, 24 “as yet the glass seems t.” V, 272 (?). “the t. acquaintance of mine ear,” John V, 6, 15. “your spirit is too t., your fears too certain,” H4B I, 1, 92. “from t. evidence,” H6B III, 2, 21. “his napkin, with his t. tears all bewet,” Tit. III, 1, 146. “the last t. duties of thy noble son,” V, 3, 155. “O t. apothecary,” Rom. V, 3, 119. “but a sickly part of one t. sense could not so mope,” Hml. III, 4, 80. “I am --st speaker,” Cymb. V, 5, 376 etc. Adverbially: “the plain simple vow that is vowed t.” All's IV, 2, 22.
3) honest: “rich preys make t. men thieves,” Ven. 724. “my t. preserver,” Tp. V, 69. “mark but the badges of these men: then say if they be t.” Tp. V, 69 “though the priest o'the town commended him for a t. man,” Wiv. II, 1, 149. “every t. man's apparel fits your thief,” Meas. IV, 2, 46. Meas. IV, 2, 46 “if you meet a thief, you may suspect him . . . to be no t. man,” Ado III, 3, 54. “a t. man or a thief that gallops so?” LLL IV, 3, 187. “as t. we are as flesh and blood can be,” LLL IV, 3, 187 “the t. man's put to death,” R2 V, 3, 73. “cried 'Stand' to a t. man,” H4A I, 2, 122. “as I am a t. man,” II, 1, 101. “to turn t. man and to leave these rogues,” II, 2, 24. “the thieves have bound the t. men,” II, 2, 24 “it was the blood of t. men,” II, 4, 343. “now for a t. face and good conscience,” II, 4, 343 “as I am a t. woman,” III, 3, 82. “so t. men yield, with robbers so o'ermatched,” H6C I, 4, 64. “I thought to crush him in an equal force, t. sword to sword,” Cor. I, 10, 15. “there is no time so miserable but a man may be t.” Tim. IV, 3, 463. “I am no t. man,” Caes. I, 2, 263. “makes the t. man killed and saves the thief,” Cymb. II, 3, 76. Cymb. II, 3, 76
In a general sense, == trustworthy, to be depended on, not failing: “each trifle under --st bars to thrust,” Sonn. 48, 2. “strong joints, t. swords,” Troil. I, 3, 238. “with your t. sword,” V, 3, 56 (cf. Cor. I, 10, 15, and see Steel). “as t. a dog as ever fought at head,” Tit. V, 1, 102.
4) faithful: “the death of this t. wife,” Lucr. 1841. “the t. concord of well-tuned sounds,” Sonn. 8, 5. “mine own t. love,” 61, 11. “supposing thou art t.” 93, 1. “fair, kind and t.” 105, 9. “my most t. mind thus makes mine eye untrue,” 113, 14. “neither t. nor trusty,” Pilgr. 86. “t. or fair,” Phoen. 64. “to be thy t. subject,” Tp. II, 2, 130. “look thou be t.” IV, 51. IV, 51 Gent. II, 2, 8. Gent. II, 2, 8 II, 7, 74. IV, 2, 5. IV, 2, 5 Wiv. II, 1, 15. Err. II, 2, 147. Mids. II, 1, 197 “(t. as steel).” V, 280. Merch. III, 2, 49. All's II, 5, 79. H4B IV, 5, 148. H6C IV, 1, 40. Troil. III, 2, 106. Hml. IV, 5, 120 etc. (t. and faithfully, in LLL V, 2, 841 == truly and faithfully. cf. Appendix). With “to:” Compl. 34. Wiv. III, 3, 28. LLL V, 2, 783. Mids. III, 2, 50. IV, 1, 181. V, 200. Wint. V, 1, 124. John V, 7, 118. R2 I, 3, 86. H6B V, 1, 82. t. love often == love: “who sees his t. love in her naked bed,” Ven. 397. “do it for thy t. love take,” Mids. II, 2, 28. Gent. IV, 2, 126. IV, 3, 20. LLL IV, 3, 122. Mids. III, 2, 89. Tw. II, 3, 41 etc.
5) genuine, real, not factitious, but being indeed so: “let me, t. in love, but truly write,” Sonn. 21, 9. “to find where your t. image pictured lies,” 24, 6. “so t. a fool is love,” 57, 13 (quibbling). “his rose is t.” 67, 8. “beauty . . . without all ornament, itself and t.” 68, 10. “to be diseased ere that there was t. needing,” 118, 8. “the t. gouty landlord which doth owe them,” Compl. 140. “how t. a twain seemeth this concordant one,” Phoen. 45. “her t. perfection,” Gent. II, 4, 197. “that is my t. humour,” Wiv. I, 3, 112. “as I am a t. spirit,” V, 5, 33. “how I may bear me like a t. friar,” Meas. I, 3, 48. “it is impossible you should take t. root,” Ado I, 3, 25. “in a false quarrel there is no t. valour,” V, 1, 120. “takest t. delight,” Mids. III, 2, 455. “I thought you lord of more t. gentleness,” II, 2, 132. “gleaned from the t. seed of honour,” Merch. II, 9, 47. “the --st poetry is the most feigning,” As III, 3, 19. “there is no t. cuckold but calamity,” Tw. I, 5, 56. “as I am t. knight,” II, 3, 54. R2 I, 3, 34. “never call a t. piece of gold a counterfeit,” H4A II, 4, 539. “acquitted by a t. substantial form,” H4B IV, 1, 173. “prince, as thou art t., for blood of ours shed blood of Montague,” Rom. III, 1, 153 (== as thou art truly a prince). “ne'er did poor steward wear a --r grief,” Tim. IV, 3, 487. “let our just censures attend the t. event,” Mcb. V, 4, 15. “all men's faces are t. . . . but there is never a fair woman has a t. face,” Ant. II, 6, 102. 105 (quibbling). “is this letter t.?” Cymb. III, 5, 106 (not counterfeited) etc. Adverbially: “a dear, a t. industrious friend,” H4A I, 1, 62.
6) conformable to reason or to rules; just, right, correct, exact: “here comes the almanac of my t. date,” Err. I, 2, 41. “establish him in his t. sense again,” IV, 4, 51. “she cannot be so much without t. judgment,” Ado III, 1, 88. “an bad thinking do not wrest t. speaking,” III, 4, 34. “as it appears in the t. course of all the question,” V, 4, 6. “the numbers t.” LLL V, 2, 35. “the throstle with his note so t.” Mids. III, 1, 130 (cf. “as duly, but not as truly, as bird doth sing on bough,” H5 III, 2, 19). “it is not enough to speak, but to speak t.” Mids. V, 121. “knew the t. minute when exception bid him speak,” All's I, 2, 39. “so long as out of limit and t. rule you stand against anointed majesty,” H4A IV, 3, 39. “in t. English, I love thee,” H5 V, 2, 237. “by t. computation of the time,” R3 III, 5, 89 (Qq just). “deaf to the voice of any t. decision,” Troil. II, 2, 173. “manifests the t. knowledge he has in their disposition,” Cor. II, 2, 15. “your dishonour mangles t. judgment,” III, 1, 158. “let me still remain the t. blank of thine eye,” Lr. I, 1, 161 (straitly within the aim of thy eye). “if it be a sin to make a t. election, she is damned,” Cymb. I, 2, 30. Adverbially: “chance as fair and choose as t.” Merch. III, 2, 133. “my dial goes not t.” All's II, 5, 6. “how t. he keeps the wind,” H6C III, 2, 14.
7) conformable to law and justice, rightful, legitimate: “your t. rights be termed a poet's rage,” Sonn. 17, 11. “upon a t. contract I got possession of Julietta's bed,” Meas. I, 2, 149. “'tis all as easy falsely to take away a life t. made as to put metal in restrained means to make a false one,” II, 4, 47. “screws me from my t. place in your favour,” Tw. V, 126. “as t. begot,” John I, 75. “his father never was so t. begot,” II, 130. “he that steeps his safety in t. blood,” III, 4, 147. “nor tempt the danger of my t. defence,” IV, 3, 84. “the t. prince,” H4A I, 2, 173. II, 4, 298. II, 4, 298 “his t. titles to some dukedoms,” H5 I, 1, 87. “in honour of a t. Plantagenet,” H6A II, 5, 52. “to conquer France, his t. inheritance,” H6B I, 1, 82. “an oath . . . not took before a t. and lawful magistrate,” H6C I, 2, 23. “Caesar shall have all t. rites and lawful ceremonies,” Caes. III, 1, 241. “the --st issue of thy throne,” Mcb. IV, 3, 106.
8) conformable to nature, due, natural: “that will ask some tears in the t. performing of it,” Mids. I, 2, 27. “he shall think by our t. diligence he is no less than what we say he is,” Shr. Ind. 1, 70. “I can give his humour the t. bent,” Caes. II, 1, 210. == of due proportions, well-shaped: “no shape so t., no truth of such account,” Sonn. 62, 6. “my mind as generous and my shape as t. as honest madam's issue,” Lr. I, 2, 8.
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