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Turn, vb. 1) trans. a) to putinto a circular motion, to move round: “t. the giddy round of Fortune's wheel,” Lucr. 952. Lr. II, 2, 180. “do not t. me about,” Tp. II, 2, 118. Wiv. V, 5, 105. Ado III, 3, 140. Cor. IV, 5, 159. “have --ed spit,” Ado II, 1, 261.
b) to form on a lathe by moving round: “I had rather hear a brazen canstick --ed,” H4A III, 1, 131.
c) to form, to shape in any manner: “every object . . . the other --s to a mirth-moving jest,” LLL II, 71. “we will t. it finely off,” V, 2, 511 (Costard's speech). “the poet's pen --s them to shapes,” Mids. V, 16. “and t. his merry note unto the sweet bird's throat,” As II, 5, 3 (some M. Edd. tune).
Hence == to change or alter from one purpose or effect to another: and --ed it thus 'It cannot be' etc. Lucr. 1539. “let us confess and t. it to a jest,” LLL V, 2, 390. “great Apollo t. all to the best,” Wint. III, 1, 15. “in her right we came, which we have --ed another way, to our advantage,” John II, 549. “wouldst thou t. our offers contrary,” H4A V, 5, 4. “I will t. diseases to commodity,” H4B I, 2, 278. “t. all to a merriment,” II, 4, 324. “that blind priest, like the eldest son of fortune, --s what he list,” H8 II, 2, 22. “you t. the good we offer into envy,” III, 1, 113. “t. all her mother's pains and benefits to laughter and contempt,” Lr. I, 4, 308. “I'ld t. it all to thy suggestion,” II, 1, 74. “my mother shall t. all into my commendations,” Cymb. IV, 1, 23.
And in general, == to change, to transform: “O day untowardly --ed,” Ado III, 2, 134. Cymb. V, 2, 17. “her favour --s the fashion of the days,” LLL IV, 3, 262. “else nothing in the world could t. so much the constitution of any constant man,” Merch. III, 2, 249. “will nothing t. your unrelenting hearts,” H6A V, 4, 59. H8 V, 2, 15. “some news is come that --s their countenances,” Cor. IV, 6, 59. “he has --ed his colour,” Hml. II, 2, 542. “t. thy complexion,” Oth. IV, 2, 62. With a double accus.: “it almost --s my dangerous nature wild,” Tim. IV, 3, 499. With into: “to t. all beauty into thoughts of harm,” Ado IV, 1, 108. “men are only --ed into tongue,” Ado IV, 1, 108 “--s into yellow gold his salt green streams,” Mids. III, 2, 393. “mountains --ed into clouds,” IV, 1, 193. Merch. III, 4, 67. Tw. I, 1, 21. Wint. IV, 4, 284. H4B V, 1, 76. H4B V, 1, 76. III, 7, 36. V, 2, 348. H6A IV, 7, 79. Cor. II, 2, 109. III, 2, 112. Caes. III, 1, 38. Oth. II, 3, 366. Cymb. IV, 2, 200. With to: “the night of sorrow now is --ed to day,” Ven. 481. “mine eyes are --ed to fire,” Ven. 481 “three beauteous springs to yellow autumn --ed,” Sonn. 104, 5. “all be --ed to barnacles,” Tp. IV, 249. “the young and tender wit is --ed to folly,” Gent. I, 1, 48. Mids. I, 1, 37. Mids. I, 1, 37 Merch. V, 78. John III, 1, 79. V, 7, 54. H4B I, 1, 201. II, 3, 27. IV, 1, 50. IV, 2, 10. IV, 4, 78. H5 I, 2, 282. IV, 1, 212. H6B IV, 10, 62. V, 2, 50. H6C III, 3, 199. H6C III, 3, 199 IV, 6, 3. R3 I, 3, 266. H8 II, 4, 73. Troil. I, 1, 40. II, 2, 83. III, 1, 133. V, 1, 64. V, 10, 18. Tit. IV, 2, 102. Rom. II, 3, 92. III, 3, 27. III, 3, 27 Hml. IV, 5, 189. V, 1, 236. Lr. III, 2, 34. III, 4, 80. Oth. IV, 1, 193. Cymb. V, 3, 33. V, 4, 80. Per. II, 1, 125.
d) to change or shift with regard to the sides; to put the upper side downward, or one side in the place of the other: “he knows how to t. his girdle,” Ado V, 1, 142. “I t. my glass,” Wint. IV, 1, 16. “this house is --ed upside down,” H4A II, 1, 11. “t. the tables up,” Rom. I, 5, 29. “--s up the white o'the eye,” Cor. IV, 5, 208; cf. “--ing up your eyelids,” LLL III, 13. “a torch that's --ed upside down,” Per. II, 2, 32. to t. one's back == to show the back instead of the face: “that ever --ed their backs to mortal views,” LLL V, 2, 161. “make mouths upon me when I t. my back,” Mids. III, 2, 238. As IV, 3, 128. Cor. III, 3, 134. Tim. IV, 2, 8. Caes. II, 1, 25. Mcb. III, 6, 41. Lr. I, 1, 178. == to fly: “t. thy back and run,” Rom. I, 1, 41. H4B I, 1, 130. to t. back == to fly: H4A I, 2, 206. H6C I, 4, 4. II, 1, 185. Caes. V, 3, 3. t. thy face in peace == go in peace: John V, 2, 159. t. thy false face == look me in the face, stand, face me, Troil. V, 6, 6; cf. “whereto the climber-upward --s his face,” Caes. II, 1, 23. to t. head == to stand, to meet the enemy, not to fly: “--s head against the lion's armed jaws,” H4A III, 2, 102. “t. head and stop pursuit,” H5 II, 4, 69. to t. the key == 1) to lock the door: R2 V, 3, 36. 2) to unlock the door: Meas. I, 4, 8. Mcb. II, 3, 2. Lr. II, 4, 53. III, 7, 64. Oth. IV, 2, 94. to t. the leaf, == to read from leaf to leaf: “where every day I t. the leaf to read them,” Mcb. I, 3, 151. “how busily she --s the leaves,” Tit. IV, 1, 45. “we --ed o'er many books together,” Merch. IV, 1, 156. “--ing o'er authorities,” Per. III, 2, 33. “is not the leaf --ed down?” Caes. IV, 3, 273 (folded or doubled down). Cymb. II, 2, 45. “the coldest that ever --ed up ace,” Cymb. II, 3, 2. Applied to clothes, == to bring the inside out: “a pair of old breeches thrice --ed,” Shr. III, 2, 45. how quickly the wrong side (of the glove) “may be --ed outward,” Tw. III, 1, 14. figuratively: “so --s she every man the wrong side out,” Ado III, 1, 68. “to dress the commonwealth and t. it,” H6B IV, 2, 6. “--ed the wrong side out,” Lr. IV, 2, 9. Oth. II, 3, 54. IV, 2, 146.
e) to change with respect to direction: “--s his lips another way,” Ven. 90. “her tears began to t. their tide,” Ven. 90 H4A IV, 1, 67. “she --s away the face,” Lucr. 1711. LLL V, 2, 148. Merch. II, 8, 47. R2 I, 1, 111. Tit. II, 4, 28. Rom. I, 4, 103. Caes. V, 5, 47. from my face she --s my foes (viz her eyes) Sonn. 139, 11. “from Athens t. away our eyes,” Mids. I, 1, 218. Cor. II, 1, 42. Cymb. I, 3, 22. “t. your forces from this paltry siege,” John II, 54. “have torn their souls by --ing them from us,” R2 III, 3, 83. “you shall have Trent --ed,” H4A III, 1, 136. “to t. and wind a fiery Pegasus,” IV, 1, 109. “to t. your looks of favour from myself,” V, 1, 30. “t. thy sword another way,” H6A III, 3, 52. “t. the force of them upon thyself,” H6B III, 2, 332. “so shouldst thou t. my flying soul,” H6B III, 2, 332 “and to my brother t. my blushing cheeks,” H6C V, 1, 99. “hath --ed my feigned prayer on my head,” R3 V, 1, 21. “he'll t. your current in a ditch,” Cor. III, 1, 96. “--s our swords into our own proper entrails,” Caes. V, 3, 95. “with his head over his shoulder --ed,” Hml. II, 1, 97. “enterprises . . . their currents t. awry,” III, 1, 87. “t. their halcyon beaks with every gale,” Lr. II, 2, 84. “t. our impressed lances in our eyes which do command them,” V, 3, 50. “fly and t. the rudder,” Ant. III, 10, 3. “t. from me that noble countenance,” IV, 14, 85. “to her father t. our thoughts again,” Per. V Prol. Per. V Prol.
== to bend from a perpendicular or horizontal direction: “this news hath --ed your weapon's edge,” H6B II, 1, 180 (blunted it). “steel, if thou t. the edge,” IV, 10, 59. “a feather will t. the scale,” Meas. IV, 2, 32. “the weight of a hair will t. the scales,” H4B II, 4, 276. “a mote will t. the balance,” Mids. V, 324. “till our scale t. the beam,” Hml. IV, 5, 157.
Refl.: “t. you where your lady is,” Merch. III, 2, 138. “thus I t. me from my country's light,” R2 I, 3, 176. “t. thee back and tell thy king,” H5 III, 6, 148. “t. thee, Benvolio, look upon thy death,” Rom. I, 1, 74. “the foul practice hath --ed itself on me,” Hml. V, 2, 329.
f) to bend, to direct: t. another (eye) into the register of your own (follies) Wiv. II, 2, 193. “no more t. me to him,” III, 4, 2. “that ever --ed their eyes to mortal views,” LLL V, 2, 163. “t. face to face and bloody point to point,” John II, 390. “t. thou the mouth of thy artillery against these walls,” John II, 390 “--ed an eye of doubt upon my face,” IV, 2, 233. “if I t. mine eyes upon myself,” R2 IV, 247. H4A I, 3, 143. “t. not thy scorns this way,” H6A II, 4, 77. “or t. our stern upon a dreadful rock,” H6B III, 2, 91. “t. you all your hatred now on me?” R3 I, 3, 190. II, 1, 32. “to t. their own points on their masters' bosoms,” V, 1, 24. “why such unplausive eyes are bent, why --ed on him,” Troil. III, 3, 43. t. the dregs of it (your wrath) “upon this varlet,” Cor. V, 2, 83. “--s deadly point to point,” Rom. III, 1, 165. “Caesar is --ed to hear,” Caes. I, 2, 17. “I t. the trouble of my countenance merely upon myself,” Caes. I, 2, 17 “such mirrors as will t. your hidden worthiness into your eye,” Caes. I, 2, 17 “thou --est mine eyes into my very soul,” Hml. III, 4, 89. “when I shall t. the business of my soul to such . . . surmises,” Oth. III, 3, 181. “t. the office and devotion of their view upon a tawny front,” Ant. I, 1, 4. “t. your displeasure that way,” III, 4, 34. “t. your eyes upon me,” Per. V, 1, 102. “toward Ephesus t. our blown sails,” Per. V, 1, 102 Refl.: “no way canst thou t. thee for redress,” H6A IV, 2, 25. “circle me about, that I may t. me to each one of you,” Tit. III, 1, 278.
g) to get, to put, to bring, to place in a state or condition: “I would t. her loose to him,” Wiv. II, 1, 189 (== let loose). “I would be loth to t. them together,” Wiv. II, 1, 189 t. him going (== send him packing) As III, 1, 18. Caes. III, 3, 38. “--ed my daughter into green,” Wiv. V, 5, 214. “so truly --ed over and over in love,” Ado V, 2, 35. “you are a fool and --ed into the extremity of love,” As IV, 3, 23. “it cannot but t. him into a notable contempt,” Tw. II, 5, 223. “first I'll t. yon fellow in his grave,” R3 I, 2, 261. “on your head --ing the widows' tears,” H5 II, 4, 106. to t. to == to put to: “nothing could be used to t. them both to gain,” Pilgr. 220. “the teen that I have --ed you to,” Tp. I, 2, 64. “a slave, that still an end --s me to shame,” Gent. IV, 4, 67. “the flame will t. him to no pain,” Wiv. V, 5, 90. “hate --s one or both to worthy danger and deserved death,” R2 V, 1, 67. “t. him to any cause of policy,” H5 I, 1, 45. all the trouble thou hast “--ed me to,” H6C V, 5, 16. “which shall t. you to no further harm,” Cor. III, 1, 284. “--ed her to foreign casualties,” Lr. IV, 3, 45.
With away, off, out, and similar words, == to discard: “I must t. away some of my followers,” Wiv. I, 3, 4. III, 3, 32. IV, 3, 12. Tw. I, 5, 18. Tw. I, 5, 18 H4B V, 5, 62. H8 II, 4, 42. Ant. IV, 2, 30. “t. melancholy forth to funerals,” Mids. I, 1, 14. “I am the --ed forth,” Tit. V, 3, 109. “have --ed off a first so noble wife,” All's V, 3, 220. Caes. IV, 1, 25. Ant. III, 6, 94. “t. her out to who will take her in,” Gent. III, 1, 77. Tit. V, 3, 105. Lr. III, 7, 96. With out of, == to drive out, to expel: “I'll t. my mercy out o' doors,” Tp. III, 2, 78. Wiv. I, 4, 131. Tw. II, 3, 78. John IV, 1, 34. H4B II, 4, 229. Cor. I, 3, 120. “--ing these jests out of service,” As I, 3, 25. H5 IV, 3, 119. “I'll t. you out of my kingdom,” Tp. IV, 253. “to t. him out o'the band,” All's IV, 3, 227. “t. this day out of the week,” John III, 1, 87. “it is --ed out of all towns,” R3 I, 4, 145.
h) to return, to give or send back: “I will t. thy falsehood to thy heart,” R2 IV, 39. “Umfrevile --ed me back with joyful tidings,” H4B I, 1, 34. I'll t. my part thereof (thy scorns) “into thy throat,” H6A II, 4, 79. “we t. not back the silks upon the merchant,” Troil. II, 2, 69. “my relief must not be tossed and --ed to me in words,” Tim. II, 1, 26.
2) intr. a) to have a circular motion, to move round: “we in your motion t. and you may move us,” Err. III, 2, 24. “made me t. i'the wheel,” Err. III, 2, 24 “the fourth --ed on the toe,” LLL V, 2, 114. “the world --s round,” Shr. V, 2, 20. “go, wind, to wind, there t. and change together,” Troil. V, 3, 110. “t. giddy, and be holp by backward --ing,” Rom. I, 2, 48. Applied to the brain, == to grow giddy: “till his brains t. o'the toe,” Tw. I, 3, 44. “lest my brain t.” Lr. IV, 6, 23. “my wits begin to t.” III, 2, 67.
b) to move the face to another side: “gentle my lord, t. back,” Meas. II, 2, 143. Meas. II, 2, 143 Err. IV, 2, 56. Err. IV, 2, 56 “t., good lady; our Perdita is found,” Wint. V, 3, 120. “from the one side to the other --ing,” R2 V, 2, 18. “all the rest --ed on themselves,” H4B I, 1, 118. “so did he t.” H5 IV, 6, 24. “he --s away,” Cor. V, 3, 168. H6B III, 2, 74. R3 I, 3, 163. “did Romeo t. and fly,” Rom. III, 1, 179. “t. aside and weep for her,” Ant. I, 3, 76.
Hence == not to fly, but to face an enemy: “t., slave, and fight,” Troil. V, 7, 13. Rom. III, 1, 70. Mcb. V, 8, 3. “should I t. upon the true prince?” H4A II, 4, 297. “t. on the bloody hounds,” H6A IV, 2, 51. “the smallest worm will t. being trodden on,” H6C II, 2, 17 (== offer resistance). “he'll not swagger with a Barbary hen, if her feathers t. back in any show of resistance,” H4B II, 4, 108. cf. “your own reasons t. into your bosoms, as dogs upon their masters,” H5 II, 2, 82.
Applied to a throw at dice: “the greater throw may t. by fortune from the weaker hand,” Merch. II, 1, 34.
c) to return: “t. back to me,” Sonn. 143, 11. Rom. II, 1, 2. Caes. III, 1, 21. “his voice, --ing again toward childish treble,” As II, 7, 162. “or t. thou no more to seek a living in our territory,” III, 1, 7. “ere from this war thou t. a conqueror,” R3 IV, 4, 184. “tarry with him till I t. again,” Tit. V, 2, 141. “you did wish that I would make her t.” Oth. IV, 1, 263.
d) to change direction: “my tide --s not, but swells the higher by this let,” Lucr. 646. “now doth it t. and ebb back,” H4B V, 2, 131. “at the --ing of the tide,” H5 II, 3, 13. “if the scale do t. but in the estimation of a hair,” Merch. IV, 1, 330.
e) to be changed, to alter; applied to milk, == to become sour: “has friendship such a faint and milky heart, it --s in less than two nights,” Tim. III, 1, 58. In a moral sense, == to be fickle and inconstant: “she bade love last, and yet she fell a --ing,” Pilgr. 100. “her fancy fell a --ing,” Pilgr. 100 “if you t. not, you will return the sooner,” Gent. II, 2, 4. “some true love --ed,” Mids. III, 2, 91. “she is --ing and inconstant,” H5 III, 6, 35. “done like a Frenchman; t. and t. again,” H6A III, 3, 85. “she can t. and t., and yet go on, and t. again,” Oth. IV, 1, 264. Oth. IV, 1, 264 “triple --ed whore,” Ant. IV, 12, 13. cf. Troil. V, 3, 110. to t. from == to fall off from; to t. to == to go over to: “when he saw the fortune of the day quite --ed from him,” H4A V, 5, 18. “the stout Parisians do revolt and t. again unto the warlike French,” H6A V, 2, 3. H6A V, 2, 3 “all will revolt from me and t. to him,” H6C I, 1, 151. “his friends will t. to us,” R3 V, 2, 19 (Qq fly). “ere my true heart t. to another,” Rom. IV, 1, 59.
Followed by a predicate, quite == to become: “sweetest things t. sourest by their deeds,” Sonn. 94, 13. “whether that my angel be --ed fiend,” 144, 9. “to t. white,” Compl. 308. “--ing mortal for thy love,” Pilgr. 244 and LLL IV, 3, 120. “you will t. good husband now,” Meas. III, 2, 74. Err. IV, 4, 160. Ado I, 1, 196. II, 3, 21. III, 4, 57. LLL I, 2, 190. V, 2, 70. Mids. III, 2, 91. Merch. I, 3, 179. III, 1, 82. As I, 2, 23. II, 5, 53. IV, 1, 101. All's V, 3, 59. Tw. III, 2, 74. H4A II, 2, 24. II, 4, 393. III, 1, 264. III, 3, 114. H4B I, 2, 192. H5 V, 1, 90. V, 2, 168. Troil. V, 2, 114. V, 3, 81. Rom. I, 2, 48. II, 3, 21. Tim. IV, 1, 3. IV, 3, 217. Caes. V, 3, 2. Mcb. II, 4, 16. Hml. III, 2, 287. Lr. II, 4, 85. III, 7, 102. Oth. II, 3, 170. Ant. I, 3, 39. Cymb. V, 3, 35. Per. II, 1, 92. IV, 3, 4.
With the prepos. to, in the same sense: “the sweets . . . t. to loathed sours,” Lucr. 867. “thy honey --s to gall,” Lucr. 867 Lucr. 867 “all things t. to fair,” Sonn. 95, 12. “every scope by the immoderate use --s to restraint,” Meas. I, 2, 132. “their counsel --s to passion,” Ado V, 1, 23. “day would t. to night,” LLL IV, 3, 233. “falsehood --s to grace,” V, 2, 786. “that pure white . . . --s to a crow,” Mids. III, 2, 142. Merch. III, 2, 184. III, 4, 78 (quibbling; see below). V, 78. As IV, 3, 40. Wint. I, 2, 417. Wint. I, 2, 417 John III, 1, 344. R2 III, 2, 136. H6A II, 2, 45. II, 3, 44. H8 I, 2, 117. Tit. II, 3, 144. Rom. I, 2, 94. I, 5, 106. IV, 5, 85. Tim. III, 1, 61. Tim. III, 1, 61 Caes. V, 1, 49. Hml. III, 2, 228. Ant. II, 5, 79. II, 6, 108. Cymb. III, 4, 84. III, 6, 54. Per. II, 1, 125. With into: “the best grace of wit will shortly t. into silence,” Merch. III, 5, 49.
f) to take a way or direction; to be bent or directed: (eyes) “quick in --ing,” Ven. 140. “which way shall she t.?” Ven. 140 “then shalt thou see the dew-bedabbled wretch t. and return,” Ven. 140 “t. up on your right hand at the next turning,” Merch. II, 2, 42. “t. of no hand,” Merch. II, 2, 42 “t. down,” Merch. II, 2, 42 “now, Thomas Mowbray, do I t. to thee,” R2 I, 1, 35. “t. this way,” H6C I, 1, 189. “speculation --s not to itself,” Troil. III, 3, 109. “I know not where to t.” Cor. II, 1, 197. With to, 1) applied to females, == to suffer to be covered: “the ewes --ed to the rams,” Merch. I, 3, 82. “shall we t. to men?” III, 4, 78 (quibbling). 2) to fall into: “she --ed to folly,” Oth. V, 2, 132. “to rage the city t.” Per. V, 3, 97. cf. Gent. I, 1, 48. 3) to have a consequence, to result or terminate in: “is all our travail --ed to this effect?” H6A V, 4, 102. “who knows how that may t. back to my advancement,” Wint. IV, 4, 867.
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