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Teach (impf. and partic. taught) to make to learn, to instruct, to inform, to communicate knowledge or skill; absol.: “to follow mine own --ing,” Merch. I, 2, 19. “the manner of his --ing,” Shr. IV, 2, 5. “a mistress to most that t.” Wint. IV, 4, 594. H4A I, 1, 96. H8 V, 3, 16. H8 V, 3, 16 Trans.; as object the thing which one is made to learn: “thou didst t. the way,” Lucr. 630. “not learning more than the fond eye doth t.” Merch. II, 9, 27. “t. lavoltas high,” H5 III, 5, 33. “maintain the thing you t.” H6A III, 1, 129. “that we but t. bloody instructions, which, being taught, return,” Mcb. I, 7, 8; cf. Shr. III, 1, 69. Oth. II, 3, 2 (ourselves nom. or accus.?). Per. IV, 6, 199 etc. The person instructed as object: “his proceedings t. thee,” Ven. 406. “I have taught him, even as one would say precisely, thus I would t. a dog,” Gent. IV, 4, 5. Gent. IV, 4, 5 “my love is thine to t.” Ado I, 1, 293. “to t. a teacher ill beseemeth me,” LLL II, 108. “highly fed and lowly taught,” All's II, 2, 4. Shr. I, 1, 197. Caes. IV, 1, 35. Oth. IV, 2, 111. V, 1, 33 etc. Double accus.: “hath taught them scornful tricks,” Ven. 501. “your love taught it this alchemy,” Sonn. 114, 4. “if I might t. thee wit,” 140, 5. “taught thee one thing or other,” Tp. I, 2, 354. “you taught me language,” Tp. I, 2, 354 “the catch you taught me,” III, 2, 127. Wiv. IV, 1, 67. IV, 5, 61. Meas. II, 4, 19. Err. III, 2, 14. LLL V, 1, 49. V, 2, 99. V, 2, 99 Mids. I, 1, 152. Mids. I, 1, 152 Merch. III, 1, 74. R2 I, 4, 13. H6C V, 6, 19. Hml. II, 2, 293 etc. The passive with the thing as subject and the person as object: “it hath been taught us from the primal state,” Ant. I, 4, 41. With the person as subject and the thing as object: “they are taught their manage,” As I, 1, 13. “you would be taught your duty,” R3 I, 3, 250. “where I was taught of your chaste daughter the wide difference twixt amorous and villanous,” Cymb. V, 5, 193. The person placed after the thing: he was a fool that taught them (these manners) “me,” H4B II, 1, 205. Preceded by to in this case: “creatures that by a rule in nature t. the act of order to a peopled kingdom,” H5 I, 2, 188.
Followed by a subordinate clause: “I'll t. you how you shall arraign your conscience,” Meas. II, 3, 21. “t. me how you look, and with what art you sway the motion of Demetrius' heart,” Mids. I, 1, 192. “t. twenty what were good to be done,” Merch. I, 2, 17. IV, 1, 440. As I, 3, 99. Rom. I, 1, 232. Mcb. I, 6, 12. Lr. II, 4, 69. By an infinitive: those eyes that taught all other “eyes to see,” Ven. 952. “t. the fool to speak,” Ven. 952 “--ing decrepit age to tread the measures,” Ven. 952 Lucr. 996. Sonn. 50, 3. 64, 11. 78, 5. 86, 5. 145, 8. Pilgr. 320. Gent. II, 1, 143. Gent. II, 1, 143 II, 6, 8. Wiv. I, 4, 115. II, 2, 214. III, 3, 44. Err. IV, 1, 101. LLL IV, 3, 13. Merch. IV, 1, 439. As I, 1, 32. III, 2, 362. Shr. IV, 5, 79. H6C I, 4, 124. Hml. I, 2, 175 etc. The inf. preceded by how: “thou --est how to make one twain,” Sonn. 39, 13. “I t. thee how to make him seem . . .,” 101, 13. Tp. I, 2, 334. II, 1, 222. Merch. III, 2, 10. As III, 2, 388. John V, 2, 88 etc. The inf. without to: “whose own hard dealings --es them suspect the thoughts of others,” Merch. I, 3, 162. To it in the place of a preceding infinitive: “I believe you: your honour and your goodness t. me to't,” Per. III, 3, 26 (i. e. to believe you; which in modern English would be: t. me so, or t. me to).
Sometimes not so much == to make to learn, as to make to know, to tell, to show: “--ing the sheets a whiter hue than white,” Ven. 398. “where is any author in the world --es such beauty as a woman's eye?” LLL IV, 3, 313. “she doth t. the torches to burn bright,” Rom. I, 5, 46 (i. e. she shows the torches, by her own radiance, what it is to burn bright). “he learned to sin, and thou didst t. the way,” Lucr. 630. cf. Meas. II, 4, 19. R2 IV, 301. All's II, 4, 35. John III, 1, 120. “who is the suitor? Shall I t. you to know?” LLL IV, 1, 110 (== shall I tell you?). “to what end, my lord? That you must t. me,” Hml. II, 2, 293.
Sometimes == to induce, to prevail on, to set on to: “him that thou taughtest this ill,” Lucr. 996. “how angerly I taught my brow to frown,” Gent. I, 2, 62. “I could have taught my love to take thy father for mine,” As I, 2, 12. “his false cunning taught him to face me out of his acquaintance,” Tw. V, 91. “if thou . . . t. thy hasty spleen to do me shame,” John IV, 3, 97. “they whom youth and ease have taught to glose,” R2 II, 1, 10. “this is his uncle's --ing,” H4A I, 1, 96. “t. not thy lips such scorn,” R3 I, 2, 172. “the bloody proclamation to escape, . . . taught me to shift into a madman's rags,” Lr. V, 3, 186. cf. Cor. II, 1, 271 (some M. Edd. touch).
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